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Full text of "S. F. News Letter (1876)"

500? 1500162 M 

California Slale Lfcrary 



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The Special and Authorized Organ of the AErial Steam Navigation Co. --Fred. Marriott. Patentee. 

Prico per Co j 13 Co».. ESTABLISHED JULY JO. 1-66. 1 Annnol SjibaertpUon. 810. 









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(Caltfot'ttta 





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DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 20 



SAN fUANOISUO, SATURDAY, JAN. 29, id76. 



No. 1. 



Ollire-. off II"' *"■■ l'ruiioUrn !fewl Litter. California ",'llliin 

Mull. California Mull liux. Boulb aide Harchant street. No. 807 

("OLD BARS— J~9O'~)900— SlLvan Bar- llec. Treasury Notts arc 

' - - . Meilcun Dollars, mi. din. Trade Dollar, 





'"Exchange on New York. '■ -r*~ per cmc, for <;.il.l ; Corr incy, IS per cent 
prem. Ool i . Paris, 6 francs 

perdoUmron New York. Telegrams, 1 percent. 

, 11.3. Latest price of 



t3f~ ijir,~t price ofOold at Ne« York, Jim. is, at 8 r. 



f-y Ptli hero, ir?,iy per cent, per month- Bank rate. In the open 

maik iiiaml active. 

Latest from the Merchants' Exchange. — New Yobk, Janu: 

13 ; 11 a. m.. at 1131 : 3p. ni.. 113. United 

Bonds - Five-twenties of 1867, 122: 1881, 118§. Sterling 

■it. Pacific Mail, 38J. Wheat, si 40@ I 50. 

Cotton,—. Hides, dry, 20@20j; green, —. oil -Sperm, 

162; Winter Bleached, SI 80@1 SO. Whale, 64@70 j Winter 

Spring, fine, 25@35; Burry, 15@20; Pulled, 

Fall Clips, 20 try, 18@22 London, Jan. 28. — Liver] 1 

"""h.-at Market, 1"-.'-' 10a. 3d. j Club, UK 6d. @ lis. United States 
5j. Cm-..!,. 94 :; Hi. 



>t;»i>'s Bonds, er-coupon, 105 



CMifcrnians Registered at the Office of Charles Le Gay, Ameri- 
can Commission Merchant,! Rue Scribe, Paris, Dec. 31.1875: L). K. 
rook and wife, Thos. B. Howardand wife. Frank Livingston and 
(ivingston, Chas. Warren Stoddard, *W. Melvin Smith, Titus 
nise, C. 1'*. Fargo, A. IS. McCreery, Joseph Gordon, Frank G. 
Merchant and family, Mrs. Henry Marshall and son, Mrs. J. W. Wilde 
and family, Mrs. F. A. Hassey, Frankie Hassey, Miss Bella Thomas, 
Mrs. Ely and family, H. A. Hedger and wife, Col. Jules Berton ami 
family, Mr., Hall kloAllister, Misses McAllister, Mr-. P. J.Hickey, J. 
Htickey, ■'. Fisher Smith, Mrs. .1. Preston Moore, H. R. Bloomer, 
man, D. E. Hungerford and wife, Miss Ada Hungerford, JohnB. 
! G ■ . Mr-, s. M tzes mill family, !•'. E. Durand, Mrs. Jeremiah Clarke 
ami family, H. de Laurence!. Gen. S. .1. Bridges, David Bixler sjid 
wife. __ 

San Franciscoites Abroad. — Paris : Mr. and Mrs. Bixler, F. T. 

Mrs. F. A. Hassey. F. K. Hassey, Mrs. E, ('. Hick.y, John P.. 

■ , Mr. and F. Livingstone, Miss Flora Livingstone, W. H. Locke, 
Mrs. and Mis, Massey, Mrs. Hall McAllister, -Mrs. Kate Moore, Mrs. 
an. I Miss i M' .Him . Mis Ulrich, Emile Ulrich. London : S. F. Bridge, 
A. M. Hough, W. H. Lncke. Naples : Mrs. r.. H. Brown, -Miss F. C. 
Gray, Mr. and Mrs. David Hewes. — American liegigter, January lit. 



So prosperous is France, that M. Leon Say, the Minister of Fi- 
nance, believes the revenue* this year will exceed £1(10,000,00(1 sterling, 
and be nearly £4,000,000 in excess of the estimates. Unfortunately the 
expenditure has risen in a similar manner, the military outlay having in- 
creased by £2,560,000, ami the Treasury, but for a balance of £1.200.000, 
would have a deficit to meet. The Departments are still, under the pres- 
ent system, too strong for the Treasury, and but for the exceptional har- 
vests France would be in difficulty. The figures, however, conclusively 
prove not only the wealth of France, but her patience under an increase of 
taxation, which we must not forget is necessary chiefly to protect her 
credit. 

A Red-Letter Day for the Tea Trade. — An important provision in 
connection with the importation of tea comes into force to-day, and it is 
nut improbable that the ultimate effect on the trade will prove of a note- 
worthy character. From this time forth all tea coming into Britisli ports, 
will have to run the gauntlet of examination by ( 'ustoms officers, and such 
parcels as are found to be mixed with other substances, that is to say. 

faced," will be prevented from going into consumption, and if adjudged 
unfit for human food may be forfeited. — Br tish Trade Report 

The Union Pacific Railroad does not exist under any State charter, 
lint is incorporated by the United States ('.ingress. Its Western exten- 
sion, however, the Central Pacific, is the Central Pacific " of California." 
The Union Pacific holds under the United States, passes through the 
public domain, and cannot, therefore, be molested by the State Legisla- 
ture of either Iowa, Nebraska or California. 



"tie. I". Alf-Ttr. Xl>. H i'lCIUCIlt* I.nue. I.OII-IOI1. In nil I llori /.»'<! to 

libscrlptions, advert!* ents, oonununloatioas, etc., Fox this paper, 



Published nith this week's issue an liiyht- 
l'age 1'ostscript. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS WITH NOTES. 



Mr. Disraeli has been giving away a batch of coronets for Christiiiis 
presents. The Bar] of Abergavenny [called "Abergenny " by the musical 
English, who contract Cholmondelev into " t Jhumley," and Marjorrbanks 
into " Marchbanks,") has been made a Marquis. This new Marquisn 

one of the oldest Barons in England, ami is the head of of the ancient uR 

historic house of the Nevills, so illustrious in the time of Warwicl 
king maker. The Marquis lias also receive 1 a second Earldom, with tpe 

ancient title of Lewes, which w ill lie borne a, a matter of courtesy by bis 
olde i BOD, hitherto known as Viscount NcviU. Mr. Disraeli's horse- 
1 nee. ling host of Critchtly, Mr. Gerald Stuart, whose stables are said to be 

a, splendid as his house, has been made apeerby the title of Lord Alling- 
ton, and Lord Wharncliffe (Mr. Stuart-Wortelyl has been made an Bart 
The Irish Earl of Erne (Crichton I has been made happy with an EugMsh 
title ami a seat in the House of Lords. 



Finance. — Our remarks of last week bold good. Money is offered in 
sums to suit, without takers. Banks as well as capitalists have balances 
to inpplj their customers with. With one word, money is easy, ami 
seems inclined to remain that way. Silver in London lias declined s.tnie- 
wbat. and the effect will lie the momentary lessening in value of our silver 
production. Trade dollars are 5 per cent., American silver 3 to 4, and 
bars from 10 to 12\ per eeut. dis tount. 

New Departure. — The San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board has 
created a new office, that of " Official Reporter," and have elected our 
old friend Franklin Lawton to that very necessary and responsible posa 
tinn. Mr. Lawton has held the Secretaryship of the Board from its in- 
stitution up to the present time, from which position he retires with the 
universal regard of his associates. We congratulate the Board on its 
new office and the gentleman who fills it. 

The London. Asiatic and American Company notify that they 
will pay on and after to-day (January II the coupons then due on the] 
Pennsylvania Railroad six per cent sterling consolidated mortgage sink- 
ing fund bonds, and also the coupons due same time on the Pennsylva- 
nia Railroad six per cent general mortgage sterling bonds, which have, 
been negotiated through them. 

Mexican Sugar. — The production of sugars in the terra) eaKentes of 

Mexico is said to have been stimulated of late by the protracted troubles 
in Cuba, anil a short time ago the first consignment of Mexican sugar 
reached the United States. It is thought that atno distant period Mexico 
will be successfully competing with the West Indies for the markets of | 
the Union. 

Coal in America. — The total production of coals in the Pennsylvania 
and adjacent regions of the Atlantic seaboard for 1875 (mining and ship- 
ment bavin- closed for the season) has been 22,071,000 tons, an increase of 
300,000 tons over last year. Of this, 10,208,977 tons were anthracite, and 
3,702,713 tons bitumi nous. 

At a recent meeting of the English and American Bank a final div- 
idend of Gs. per share was declared. The bank went into liquidation m 
1867 and the shares were then £10 fully paid. The return now made 
will make a total payment of £9 16s. to the shareholders after paying all 
expenses of liquidation. 

The Australian mails are not expected to leave by the City of Mel- 
bmrne until the latter part of next week, the British mails having reached 
New York only yesterday. . 

There is a rumor afloat that the Gas Company intend putting two 
pipes to each house— one for hot air and the other for gas— the present 
mode of supplying both through one tube causing complaint. 

Residents at the north end of the city desiring to catch the afternoon 
train to San Jose will have ten minutes at the depot to procure ticket ■ by 
taking the A. M. North Beach car. 



Printed aad Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to^lo Merchant Street, San Francisco, California, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Jan. 29, 1876. 



O, aweet and fair ! 0, rich and rare 

That day so long ago. 
The autumn' sunshine everywhere, 

The heather all aglow, 

The ferns were clad in cloth of gold 
The waves sang on the shore. 



AGAIN. 

One day again, no cloud of pain 
A sha low o'er ua cast) _ 

And yet we strove in vain, in vain, 
To conjure up the past : 

Like, but unlike, the sun that shone, 
The waves that heat the shore. 



Such suns will shine, such waves will The words we said, the son-awe sung ; 



sing 

Forever more. 



Like, — unlike, — evermore. 



0, lit and few ! 0, tried and true 

The friends who met that day. 
Each one the other's spirit knew, 

And so in earnest play 
The hours flew past, until at last 

The twilight kissed the shore. 
Wesaid "Such days shall come again Tho' like the same, are not the same 

Forever evermore." O, never, never more ! 



For ghosts unseen crept in between, 
And, when our songs flowed free, 
Sang discords in an undertone, 
And marred our harmony. 
" The past is ours, not yours," they 
said : • 
The waves that beat the shore, 



NOTES IN PANAMA. 
Panama is the communistic leper of America. It is the nest of cor- 
morants, in which the bird of passage must rest on the way to happier 
climes, but certain it is, the nest is more befouled by the domestic bird 
than by the stranger. Poverty is the only crime in this moral Golgotha 
—extortion, theft, arson, highway robbery, and murder are its cardinal 
virtues. Society there— if the term may be so degraded— revolves around 
the Pacific Mail agent, who enjoys the unenvied honor of being patroon 
amongst as nice a set of offscourings as old father Satan ever produced. 
But then it's not his fault, but his misfortune. Since the time of the 
American massacre, many years ago, the ex-criminals who serve the 
sovereign State of Panama as burlesque on soldiers march down 
t ) the .Mail wharf on the arrivals of trains from Aspinwall, and guard the 
embarkation of passengers on board the Pacific steamers. On such occa- 
sions they managed to dress in full, but at all other times saunter about the 
streets like veritable sans culottes, who regard shoe leather with the same 
aversion the devil is presumed to nave towards holy water; The police, if 
anything, are still more dilapidated and occupy their time in arresting ex- 
iuajnhers of the force, who alternate the role of thief with that of guardian 
of the law, their coat of arms being a pair of manacles with the legend — 
TempoVu m ma nt ur et nos vmtamur in Ulu. Panama's possibilities are 
based on the rose colored expectation of when the ship canal shall be 
built. A pleasant delusion perhaps, but nature has declared against it, 
for when the canal is built it will be by the Nicaraugue route, and then 
vale Panama's hope of expansion. The proprietor of the Star and Herald 
is the Jupiter Tonans of the place, and fully appreciates 'the dignity. His 
chief occupation is to feed the canal fever, and do some tall bragging for 
the Isthmians— no small responsibility in a community of braggarts, but 
in this obnoxious duty, a competitor recently entered— a San Francisco 
Irishman, who started a paper called the Sun. The name was given as a 
matter of policy, the sun being a more powerful luminary than a common 
star. The younger journal is the more enterprising in local news, but a 
long experience has made the Star the better purveyor of literary flap- 
doodle. The cathedral fronting on the plaza has been undergoing restora- 
tion at all times within the memory of man, but it appears to be a 
Sysyphian task. Collections are made from the faithful every year, but 
where the money goes is one of the wonders of Panama. During our stay 
there, a few plasterers were pretending to work on the interior, and we 
amused ourselves reading the monumental tablets of the departed. There 
be sermons in stones, indeed, but they are principally sermons on lying. 
Here is one telling at length of the most illustrious Seniior Don Alejandro 
Cesar Fulano, who went to abetter world in the odor of sanctity, 7i* years 
old. Venerable holiness, indeed ; and here another one about the equally 
illustrious Seiiora Dona Serafiua Maria In inguna, who ascended straight to 
heaven, but forgot taking the earthly casket with her. There are more 
ruined churches in Panama than would satisfy a communist, and they in- 
dicate the former morality of this village where so many laborers in the 
vineyard were required to snatch away a few brands from the burning. In 
the outskirts of the town are the cemeteries. They adjoin one another, 
the first being a plat of ground for the plebians — all overgrown with weeds 
— in the center a wooden cross, and at its foot skulls and like emblems of 
mortality. A more dreary spot cannot be imagined. Next is the place for 
people who pay. It is a square, walled in with brick, and around the 
Bides are the mortuary ovens which receive and keep the tenants as long 
as the rent is forthcoming. When it ceases, they are unceremoniously 
passed over the wall into the potters' field. This patrician resting place is 
called the Panteon ; one often finds grandiose Spanish designations in an 
inverse ratio to beauty. Last comes the foreign cemetery — a cheerful con- 
trast to the other with its neat monuments and flowers. The fatal word 
cholera is visible on many of the tombstones. On the way back we passed 
through the market-place, where the hucksters temptingly display their 
truck on cabbage leaves or on terra firma. The showing is not varied ; a 
few fish, iguanas, a species of lizard which serves as chicken; plantains, 
bananas and other tropica] fruits, dry looking steaks off the tough native 
cattle, strings of jerked beef, and cabbages from California. Almost every 
house in the place has liquor for sale, the merits of which will not bear dis- 
cussion. At every door you will see a game cock spanchelled, for cock- 
fighting is a passion with the uati^s. On Sundays the grand main comes 
off, but they do not use gaffs, and so, though much gallic blood is spilled, 
there is little loss of life. Your Panamanese cannot afford to lose his pet, 
and then who knows there may be success at the next venture ? He who 
fights and runs away is not altogether despised amongst chickens. Next 
to himself and his gamecock, the Panama husband loves brandy and 
somebody else's wife. To live for a time in Panama merits the plenary 
indulgence of Providence, as we thought on leaving it after a fortnight's 
expiation. Once on board the homeward bound steamer one feels a light- 
headedness such as the imprisoned bird must feel when liberated. Bound- 
ing over the blue Pacific for a few days restores the normal feeling, and 
we come to think of Panama as a hideous nightmare. 



Dr. Landis, of Philadelphia, advertises that he has $5,000 to put up 

against any one who will play Hamlet with him. This is an opportunity 
that may not occur again in ninety-five years, and we call the attention of 
Happy Jack to this and other inducements that Centenniadelphia offers 
to him to spend the balance of his days there. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporated! in ftencva. Switzerland, January 24th. 1873. 
HeadOJije, in Geasvo. Capital, $3,000,000. subscribed, ?l,O0i),OQ0 paid 
u». President, tfETTRTi H^Xl'SUII. San Franc;-."" Branch, successors to Messrs. 
Hiatich&jferfcun, 527 Clay street. Directors: FRANCIS BEKToN and ROBERT 
WATT. 

This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to transact every 
kind of Banking, Mercantile and Exchange Business, and bo negotiate American Se- 
curities in Europa. DjpDsits received. 

Bills of .Exchange on New York, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool, Paris, 
Lyons, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Oloron, Brussels, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort, Geneva, 
Lausanne, Chaux-de-Fonds, Neuchatel, Frihourg, Bern, Aarn, Soleure, Baden, Basic, 
Zurich, Wintorthur, Shaffhausen, St. Gallen, Lucent, Chur, Bcllinzona, Locarno, Lu- 
gano, Mendrisio, Genoa, Turin, Milan, Florence, Rome. 

An Assay Office is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores 
and sulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any 
part of the country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 
^___ " [September 18.1 ^ ^_^ 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 
». O. MILLS President. | THUS. BROWN Cnsliler. 

Agents : 

In New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfomia, No. 12 Pine street ; in Boston, 
Tremont National Bank"; in Chicago, Union National Bank : in St. Louis, Boatman's 
Saving Bank ; in London, China, Japan and India, toe Oriental Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia city and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of ttie Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the 
United States, Europe, India. China, Japan and Australia Draw direct on London, 
Dublin, Paris, St. Petersburg!!, Amsterdam. Antwerp, Hamburg, Bremen, Berlin, 
Leipsic, Vienna, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Got- 
eborg, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, New Zealand, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
ypkohama. _ Sept. 26. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.--- Southeast corner of Cal- 
ifornia and Sansome streets. Head Office — London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon ; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

Agents :— New York, Bank of Montreal; Chicago, Bank of Montreal; Canada, 
Bunk of Montreal ; Mexico and South America. London Bank of Mexico and South 
America; Ireland, Bank of Ireland; Scotland, British Linen Company; England, 
National Provincial Bank of England ; England, North and South Wales Banks ; En- 
gland, Bank of Liverpool. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Deposits received on current ac- 
count subject to check, or on deposit. Exchange sold on London and all the princi- 
pal cities and towns of Ireland and Scotland from .tl upward ; also on New York and 
all principal places in Canada. Commercial Credits granted available in Europe, 
China, Japan, South America. Australia and New Zealand. Approved Bills discounted 
and advances made on good collateral security. 

Nov. 13. WM. II. TILL1NGHAST, Manager. 

THE NEVADA BANK, OF SIN FRANCISCO. 
Paid Up Cap.tal $5,000,000, in Gold. 

Louis McLane President. | .T. C. Flood. .Vice-President. 

X. Ii. Mas ten Cashier. 

Tristees : — J. C. Flood, J. W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, Louis McLane. 

Correspondents: — London— Smith, I'ayne & Smiths. Hamburg— Hessy, Newman 
& Co. New York— Eugene Kelly & Co. Chicago -Merchants' National Bank. Bos- 
ton — Second National Bank. New Orleans — State National Bank. 

This Bank i> prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. * tot, 9. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK 0? SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Goltt. President, George F. 
Hooper ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier. K. C. Woolworth. CORRE- 
SPONDENTS— London : Baring Brothers & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman &Co. Paris: Hottingner&Co. NewYork: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and (_ urrency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rate of Exchange. Dec. 13. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINC-S UNION, 
X*J*^ California street, corner Webb. Capital ami He- 

(lPO-C- atrve, S-^31,000. Deposits, sii,!H!>,000. DIRECTORS: James de Frcincry, 
President; Albert Miller, Vice-President; C. Adolphe Low, D. J. Oliver, Charles 
Baum, Charles Pace, "Washington Bartlett, A. Campbell, Sen., George C. Potter ; 
Cashier, Lovell White. Dividends for two years past have been 7A and 9 per cent, re- 
spectivel} - , on ordinary and term deposits. Dividends are payable semi-annually, in 
January and July. Money loaned on real estate and on United States Bonds, or 
equivalent securities. October 30. 

WESTERN SAVINGS AND TRUST COMPANY, 

NTT7! Comer Post and Kearny streets— Dividend Xotiee. 
« S-Jm The Board of Directors oi the Western Savings and Trust Company of San 
Francisco have declared a dividend of ten (10) per cent, per annum on term deposits, 
and eight (S) per cent, per annum on ordinary deposits, for the half year ending De- 
cember 31, 1375, and payable on and after the 15th of January, 1870. 
Jan. 8. By order J. H. GRIFFITH, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND OF THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND I0AN 50 IETY. 

For the half year en sling- this date, the Itoaril of Directors 
of the Gentian Savings and Loan Society has declared the dividend on Term 
Deposits at the rate of nine per cent, per annum (0 per cent. ), and on < irdinary De- 
posits at the rate of seven and one-half per cent, per annum (7\ per cent.), frecfrom 
Federal Taxes, and payable on and after the fifteenth day of January, 1S7G". 
By order. GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 

San Francisco, December 81, 1875. Jan. 8. 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital $200,000. — Office 538 California street, 
North side, between Montgomery and Kearny streets. Office hours, from _\.ji 
to 3 p.m. Extra hour on Saturdays from 7 to S p.m, for receiving of Deposits only. 
Loans made on Heal Estate and other collateral securities, at current rates of interest. 

President L. GOTTIG. | Secretary GEO. LETTE. 

DIRECTORS. 
F. Roedinp, H. Schmieden, Ohas. Kohler, Ed. Erase, Dan. Meyer, (.'has. Meinecke 
Gtorge H. Eggcrs, P. Sprecklcs. Feb. 1. 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LO^N SOCIETY. 
Bush street, above Kearny, G. Ma he, Director. I. onus 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



411 



Jan. 29, i 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



ff 



LOOII OUT FOR "THE KEN WE KNOW. 

WITH THE NEXT NUMBER OF THE 

''''l^V^.-^i.''-^ 

•Jf. HP 

Will appear aa a SUPPLEMENT thereto, the Bret installment of our Gallery of Portraits and Biographies of 




44 



THE MEM 



Bl 



pictoma trill form when completed, > full end comprehensive collect! f the MOST DISTINGUISHED AND PROMINENT CITIZENS 

OF THE Pull' [i ' COAST, and particularly of oui immediate community. Tiny will be unique ,.f their kind, ami gotten up at very great expense, 
in the HIGHEST STYLE I IF THE ENGRAVER'S ART. The large and influential circulation of the 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

■broad has suggested the idea of affording our readers an opportunity of becoming acquainted in this way with the 

" COUNTERFEIT PRESENTMENT " 

( ,f those of our noted citizens, whose histories, in connection with the wenderful development of our country, are already as familiar as household 
words in every part .if the world. Brief but comprehensive accounts of the lives and careers of each subject will accompany the engravings. The 
initial installment oi this 

SSRISS OF* PORTRAITS 

w ;ll appear next week, and will be faithful ami accurate likenesses .if two of THE BONANZA PRINCES, 

MESSRS. FLOOD AND O'BRIEN. 

A number of other Calif oruian celebrities are already in the hands of the engraver. Nearly all of these pictures are, and will be, taken expressly for 
the NEWS LETTER, and many of them will be the only portraits of the originals in existence. 



THE FABLES OF SAM BREE, THE YANKEE. 

L Enriwaud and Teardor. — Enriwaud was a shepherd who owned a 
ick of sheep, but, as he oared too much for the ewes and nothing at 
all for the rams [barring their fieece), his Bock deteriorated, and was no 
better than it ought to be. Enriwaud had a bosom friend named Teardor, 
who had a dough-faced angel called Liza, who officiated as his wife when 
n't hankering after other Teardors. Now Enriwaud concluded to 
branch off into the chicken business, and persuaded Liza to become a 
Bleeping partner, and take care of their sequestered nest. This was against 
the words of Lor, a ruler among the people, and Teardor, .hearing of it, 
dragged Enriwaud before one Rank Mutton, a muchalfrend, and com- 
plained. '" I didn't mean to," said Enriwaud. "Don't do it again," Baid 
Teardor. " Pur.se, gravey and meat,*' pronounced Rank Mutton, and En- 
riwaud responded, Meat, gravey and purse." Then Teardor took the 
purse, and Enriwaud the meat and gravey, and they all kissed and slob- 
bered, and everything was serene as long as the purse lasted. But when 
the purse gave out, Teardor asked Enriwaud for another one, which, being 
refused, lie threatened to kick up a bobbery and ruin Enriwaud's sheep 
business. Enriwaud scoffingly replied. "Goto! when the skies fall we 
shall catch larks. Behold, am I not an angel, and who will believe th& .'" 
But Teardor tried it on and kicked up a bobbery, which caused Enriwaud 
to lose all his white sheep, and Lizas chicken business was ruined. 

MORAL.— There's a plentiful lack of it, but if any other shepherd wants 
to start a chicken ranch, he had better select a dough-faced angel who 
doesn't belong to any Teardor. 

TT The Foolish Cricket. — An adolescent cricket was picking his teeth 
one day after dinner, and meditating upon the Malthusian theory, and 
how nice it was to enjoy single blessedness, instead of having to skirmish 
around after a wife's grub— when just then an acquisitive pullet came 
along and gobbled him up. 

Moral.- -Matrimony should not be despised, for if that cricket had had 
a wife, the pullet might have gobbled her instead. It's easy enough to get 
another wife, but very difficult to get out of a pullet's craw. 



The inauguration of the library of the " Ligue Nationale Francaise " 
took place last Monday in the rooms of the Association, on Sutter street. 
The library was filled, notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, 
with the elite oi our French citizens, including many ladies. Eloquent ad- 
dresses were made by M. de Kirwan, the President, and by Mr. Levy. 
The library already numbers some three thousand volumes, many of them 
of considerable value, among which we may mention a complete file of the 
Moniteur from its commencement, forming almost of itself a history of 
France during the last century. 



THE AVERY OBSEQUIES. 

The observances that attended the committal to the tomb of our late 
friend and distinguished citizen, the Hon. Benjamin P. Avery, were 
attended by a vast concourse of very sincere mourners. The deceased 
was endeared to hundreds in our midst by the warmest ties of affection and 
friendship, and to all of us by his fair fame as a man and his eminent ser- 
vices in public life. The imposing pagent of the military and the services 
at the church were remarkably impressive. Among those who gathered 
to do honor to the memory of our former Minister to China were num- 
bered every citizen of note in the State. A most touching and exquisite 
poem by Mr. Daniel O'Connel was read by Mr. Harry Edwards, and 
which only lack of space prevents our laying before our readers in full. 
The eulogy, by Dr. Stebbins, was a beautiful and well-merited tribute to 
a noble and single-hearted man. Of the dense assemblage of distin- 
guished people present we have only room for the pall bearers, which 
were as follows : 

Major-General George R. Vernon. 

Major-General James Coey. 

TJ. S. Collector of Customs, Thos. B. Shannon. 

U. S. Naval Officer Edwin G. Waite. 

1". S. Circuit Judge Lorenzo Sawyer. 

U. >S. Circuit Judge Ogden Hamilton. 

Ex-Governor Frederick E. Low. 

Ex-Governor H. H. Haight. 

Major A. J. Bryant. 

Ex-Mayor William Alvord. 

TJ. S. Pay Director John S. Cunningham. 

Isaac Friedlander, President Chamber of Commerce. 

PAVILION SKAT]NG. 

General Assemblies will be heltl in ibe Mechanics* Pavilion, 
corner Mission and Eighth streets, every Morning' from 10 to 12, every Aiier- 
from 2 to 4A, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Evenings from g to 10. (No Assem- 
blies Sundays.) 

ADMISSION PRICES. 

To Morning Assemblies Free j To Evening Assemblies 50 cts 

To Afternoon Assemblies 2a cts ( Tickets in packages of twelve $4 00 

Use of Skates on all occasions .25 cts. Dee. 11. 

NOTiCa OF REMOVAL. 

Fry, Neal «V Co.. Commission .Stock Brokers, bavc removed 
to Nil 330 Montgomery street. Safe Deposit Building. 
Chab. S. Neal, Member S. F. Stock & Exch. Bo ard, [Jan. 29.] E. M. Fry. 

COtfCENTRPPTEJ) GREEN TURTLE. 

Put un in cans of 2 1-2 Pounds ami warranted to keep. For 
sale by RODGERS, MEYER £ CO. November 27. 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Jan. 29, 187G. 



THE CALIFORNIA HOP VINE. 

[ BY HARRY EDWARDS. J 

The following is the intrmhiction of Mr. Harry Edward's Long ex- 
pected paper on tiie "California Hop Vine/' read last evening at the meet- 
ing of the Academy of Science : 

The Hup Vine 01 which 1 speak is, as its name indicates, a native of 
California, and flourishes in almost every portion of our State. There are 
a great many varieties of it ; for instance, even here in San Francisco v. r e 
have the Ivy Hup. the Olympic Hop, the Myrtle Hop, and several others 
so 'familiar to yon that it is needless to mention them. Thin vine is gen- 
erally an annual, but in some towns in California they have a weekly 
Hop. The scientific nomenclature and so forth of the vine may be briefly 
summed up as follows; Humulus SupiUtn, Al at Lloyds, O.K., S.T. 
1360 3L, I. O.L'., I.X.L., Annual and Bivalve. It is called Hop Vine 
from a peculiarity it had of hopping from one place*to another. Thus, if 
the soil it is set in be barren and inhospitable, it frequently vacates it for 
asoil more generous. We all remember the case of JDinschwindle verms 
Mahoney. Both of these gentlemen were neighbors, and resided on Pine 
street, above Stockton. Each had a garden in front of his house. Din- 
sshwinoUe's garden was of such a barren and sterile nature that every.one 
thought nothing but Chinese Hyacinths could flourish in it. Dinschwin- 
dle thought otherwise, and 80 covered it all over with California Hop 
Vines, When .Mahoney saw this he said nothing, but kept the soil in his 
garden in very good condition. This went on quietly for about a month, 
when one night there was a slight frost, ami ad the vines hopped from 
Dinschiviudle's into Mahoney'e garden. Dinschwindle thinking there was 
some shinanigan about the matter, took an action at law against Maho- 
ney. It was clearly proved in court, from the testimony of Jimmy Mc- 
Ginn, a distinguished amateur botanist, who devotes himself, however, 
mostly to the planting department, that it was the nature of the vine, and 
so the case was dismissed. The Judge, however, remarked that if Din- 
schwindle, by improving the soil of his garden could attract the vines back 
again, then Mahoney would have no grounds for legal action against him. 

The Hop Vine grows with great rapidity. An inch an hour is its usual 
s andard. In some parts of California they employ the vine as a time- 
piece by setting a cutting of the plant against the wall, on which the hours 
are marked by inches. At the end of twenty-four hours, or whatever 
time they have graduated the wall, the plant is cut down, and the stump 
continues keeping time. 

Tin- California Hop Vine must not be confounded with the Eumulus 
Caledoniw or Hop Scotch, corrupted very frequently of late from Hop 
Scotch into Hot Scotch. Although, gentlemen, you are all perfectly fa- 
miliar with the hist mentioned article, yet I will direct specimens to be 
h mded around. 

[ At this stage of the paper Hot Scotch was passed round to all the 
members, which seemed to interest them very much.] 

The Hop Vine makes a most excellent cushion or pillow to take to 
Church. By its aid one is able to sit down while a sermon is being 
preached, and become so en rapport with the speaker that he knows not 
only what is said but much more than the clergyman himself. 

Mr. Edwards now directed pillows of Hop Vine to be handed round. 
E ich member laid a pillow at the back of his chair to test its efficacy. 
When Mr. Edwards attempted to resume, the snoring of the members 
completely drowned his voice. After several ineffectual efforts, he was at 
last obliged to desist. Our readers and all lovers of botanic knowledge 
need not feel disappointed, us Mr. Edwards assures us in the next number 
of the " Transactions of the Academy of Science " will be published the 
conclusion of his paper on the "California Hop Vine." 



LORD DERBY'S DEFENSE OF THE SUEZ PURCHASE 
In an address to workingmen at Edinburgh Lord Derby frankly avowed 
the motives which had actuated him in his dealings with the ivhedive. 
The policy he disclosed was not one of the dazzling mystic kind which Mr, 
Disraeli might have made of it. He would acknowledge no arriere pen see, 
but affirmed bluntly that his first thought was to prevent the shares chang- 
ing hands at all. Should the Khedive have to part with them he feared 
they would find an owner less friendly to this country. Having failed in 
a scheme for mortgaging the shares the purchase becamed unavoidable, 
and it was made. His lordship disclaimed any monopolist policy which 
might cause uneasiness to other powers, most of all to France. His object 
had not been to enable England to interfere in the administration of the 
canal, but to secure its neutrality and freedom " We wanted," he said, 
" and we have obtained, additional security for that which is to us a neces- 
sity free and uninterrupted passage through Egypt to India. We felt it 
to be essential that that great highway, over which we have even now 
more than three-fourths of the traffic, should not be exclusively in the 
hands of the foreign shareholders of a foreign company. An opportunity 
was afforded us of acquiring a right in it, and that opportunity we used. 
There was no deep-laid scheme in the matter. We had not a week to con- 
sider it from the first moment when we heard that the sale was intended, 
and our first idea was not so much to buy the property for ourselves as to 
prevent it from changing hands at all. I am happy* to believe that in 
foreign countries there has been little, if any, of that jealousy and sus- 
picion excited which was predicted by some persons as a possible conse- 
quence." During the past week the concoctors of deep-laid schemes have 
been exercising there ingenuity on a second transaction with the Khedive, 
in which Lord Derby and a French Syndicate were represented to be try- 
ing to cut each other out. The Khedive possesses a number of founders' 
shares, which are entitled to a fixed proportion of the net profits after the 
five per cent, interest payable on the ordinary stock of the company. M. 
de Lesseps, it was alleged, had obtained for him an offer of £1,800,000, but 
the English (Jovernment had capped it with one of two millions. It is 
alleged that M. de Lesseps has arranged with a Paris syndicate for an ad- 
vance of two millions on these founders' shares. Thus states a well estab- 
lished authority, the British Trade Report. 



The town of Abancay, Peru, which contains important sugar re- 
fineries and a population of 5,000, was entirely destroyed by an earth- 
quake on the night of the 4th and morning of the 5th of December, no 
less than thirty seven shocks, some of them very severe, being felt. No 
details of loss of life have been received, but the loss of property was 
large. 

Disraeli is seventy ; and 'tis really shSmeful the way the old fellow 
does flirt with the ladies. 



INSURANCE AGFNCY OF 
HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

KO 314 CALIFORNIA STRI1ET, SAN FKAXCISCO. 

AOK?,'TS FOR THE 

Franklin Ins, Co Indianapolis Tnd \ c n- Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 



ire Ins. Co Philadelphia. 

.st. Paul F. .v :,i. his. Co... St Paul, Minn. 

Atlas Ins. Co Hartford Omii. 

St. Nicholas Ins. Co New York 



People's I ns, CqA Memphis, '"mih 

Borne [na Co .Columbus, Ohio 

People's Ins. Co Newark, X. J. 

National L. I. Co., U. s. A..Wash'n, D. C 

Capital Represented, Twelve Millions. 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRAFLE PROPERTY AT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON, MANN A SMITH, fieueral Agents, 

Dec. 5. 314 California street, San Fr&nclsco. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CAI1F0EN7A. 
""VT©. -iOti California street, nest tlo^r to Bank of California. 

X* Fire Insurance Company. Capital, 8300,000. Ofpicbus :— J. F. Houghton, 
President : Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President; Charles K. story. Secretary, H H 
BIGiXOW, General Manager. 

Dibeotobb. — San Francisco — Geo. II Howard, F. D. Atherton.H. F. Teschemacher, 
A. B. Grogun, John H. Redington, A. W. Bowman, C. S. Hobbs, B. M. Bartshorne, 
D. Conrad, Wm. H. Moor, George S. Johnson, II. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood, B. L. 
'■ml-. George 9. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr.. Joseph Galloway, W T. 
Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A, P. Hotaling. Oregon Branch — P. Wasserman, is. Cold- 
smith, L. F trover, D. Maeleay, C. H. Lewi*, Lloyd Brooke. J. A. Crawford, 1 >. M. 
French, J. Lowenberg, Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
ville — 1). E. Knight. San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento branch - Charles 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Earl, 
Isaac Loh man, Julius Wetzlar ; Julius Wetzlar, Manager ; I. Lohman, Secretiirv. 
Stockt hi Branch— U. H. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. "rr. W. F. 
McKee, A. \Y. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, if. M. Fanning-. H. H. Hewlett, .Manager; X. 
M. <_>rr. Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Belden, A. Pfieter, .1. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphy , J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley— William Watt, Robert Watt. Xa- 
vada — T. W. Sigoumey. Feb. 17. 



COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CAIIFOENrA. 

Fire and Marine. —C. W. Kellogg, President; Charles A. 
LaUm, Secretary. Cash Assets, January 1st, 1'-.;", s-l ;'-:■>, ,y» ;ti, Dihectors : 
W. W. Dodge, of W. W. Dodge .^ Co., Merchants; Claus Spreckels, President Cal- 
ifornia Sugar Refinery ; Selden S. Wright, Judge County Court : W. B. Ctunmings, of 
W. B. Cunr.nings & Co., Merchants ; Bartlett Doe, of B. & J, S. Doe. Manufacturers ; 
Frank Eastman, Printer; C. W. Kellogg, of Wilmcrding A Kellogg, Merchants ; A. 
W. Jee, Merchant ; Peter Dean, Capitalist ; John H. W ise, of Or i i-ty & Wise, Mer- 
chants ; C. J. Deering, of peering & Co., Merchants ; Levi Stevens, of Stevens, La- 
ker & Co., Merchants; A. J. Pope, of Pope & Talbot, Ship Owners, etc; Charles 
.Main, of Main & Winchester, Merchants ; B. G. Crane, of Hayes, Hastings & Co., 
Merchants; W. L. Elliott, U. S. A. ; George L Bradley, Capitalist Sacramento: 
H. S. Crocker, of H. S. Crocker & Co., Merchants ; X. D. Thayer. Capitalist ; F. S. 
Freeman, of Woodland, Capitalist ; D. H. Haskell. C. P. R. R." Office in San Fran- 
cisco : No. 228 California street, Tallant's New Bank Building, N. E. corner Califor- 
nia and Battery streets. May -12. 

FIRE -SND MARINE INSURANCE— UNICN IhS. CO. OF S. F. 

The California Uoyds.— Established in 1S61. — 5os. 410 and 
118 California street. Cash capital ->7ri0,00u in Cold. Assets exceed si ,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! D] RECTI IRS. 
— San Fkancisco— J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer. Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, Charles 
Kohlcr. Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool. A. Weill, X. G. Kittle, Jabcz 
Howes, Nicholas tuning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham. J. Baum, M. 1>. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustave Toucliard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox, T. Lorn 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindcnber^er. SACRAMENTO*— Edw. Cadwaladcr, J. F. 
Houghton, L. A. Booth. Makysvillk— L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portland, O. — 
Henrv Failing. New York— J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GCSTAX E TOUCHABD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary-. Geo. T. Eohen, Surveyor. Oct. 2ft 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 

FIKE AXD MARINE. 

/lush Assets, sr>i».t>iM). — Principal Office. 409 California 

\j street, San Francisco. OFFICERS :— PETER Donaire, President ; A J. Bryant, 
Vice-President ; CHARLES H. Cushikq, Secretary. Board o>- Directors :— Peter Dona- 
hue, James Irvine. C. D. O'Sullivan, J. D. Cougldin, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, 
R. Bailey. E. W. Corbert, George O. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, 
H. I-L Watson, Alexander Austin, P. J. White, \Y. A Piper, M. Mayhlmn. Richard 
Ivers, John RosenfeUL P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, F. P. F. Tem- 
ple, Los Angeles. Win. Bihler, Sonoma County.' H. W. Seale Slayfield. C. T. Ry- 
aud, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY. FIEE AND MARINE. 

Established 1839. Cnnit.il $5,0O0.000 : Paid lp Capital, 
P.,200,000; Surplus Assets. s;i74,4o'i>. Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 
Underwrite, through the medium of their Agents, against loss by fire of every de- 
scription, and for voyage or time on Hullo, Merchandise, Freights, etc., to and from 
all parts of the world, at the current rates of premium. Claims adjusted and paid 
in San Francisco, London, Glasgow, or any of the Company's Australian or New Zea- 
land offices, at the option of the insured. HUGH CRAIG, 
Slav 1. Agent for California, No. 307 California street. 

NEW ENGLAND MQTTJAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business of liife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. Tins company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE LYERSOX, general Agent. 
April 23. ] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $5.000,000.— Agents: Balfour. Onthrie A Co., No. 
230 California street, San Francisco. Xo. IS. 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, 815, OOO, 000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
wards of S8 ( t50,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, $1,3450,000. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 



W. Morris. 



J. F. Kennedy 



Jos. Schwab. 
MORRIS, SCHWAB & CO.. 

Importers and Dealers in ^foldings. Frames. Engravings, 
Chromos, Lithographs, becalcomanie, Wax and Artists' Matt-rials, 
Oct. 20. 21 Post street, nearly opposite Masonic Temple, S. F. 



Jan. *J », i 



OALIFORNI \ ADVERTISER. 






ArTEH THE BAT.I. 

I 

there, 

i" wulu .in. I quadrillt, 
irla, 
Who ovir tit- tir., when .ill i* itul, 
Comb out their brmida mi. I curli. 

I 
Knoti of Bow«n ud t [1 

For the revel is thi 
And Maud mid Madge in robes "f white, 

The ■■■ i -.-"« at under the ran, 

SfeoolringlMS, slipuerlen, »it in the ni^'lit, 

i i* done, 
Sit .i'il comb their beautiful hair, 

wonderful waves of brown and gold ( 
Till tlir tiiv u out in the dumber there, 

\rl ti..- little bare feel ore cold. 
.1 of tin' gathering winter i-hill, 

the bifrti r St, Agnea weather, 
While the fire i^ out and the house i.> still, 

Maud and Madge togethi r, 
hfaud and Madge in robe* of white, 

Tli- ; ii- under tin.' sun, 

Curtained away from the chilly night, 

After the revel i.- done, 
Float along in ■■<■ splendid dream, 

To :» gnUlerj gittorae tinkling tune, 
Wlii!.' :i t lousand ruatrea Bhinunering stream 

In a ualace a grand >.il- mn. 
Flashing "i" Jewels and flutter of laces, 

Tropical oders Bweeter than musk, 
Men anil women with beautiful faces, 

And eyes of tropical dusk, - 
And "ii" i'a » shining out like a star, 

i hi.- hue hunting tl'e dreams of each, 

And "lie VOiofl sweeter than others are, 

ing into silvery Bpeech, 

Telling', through lips of lte;mfe*l bloom, 

Aii "hi. "i.I story over again, 
A> down the royal banner room. 

To the golden gittern's strain, 
Two arid two, they dreamily walk, 

While an unseen spirit walks bsside, 
Ami all unheard in the lovers' talk, 

He claimeth one for a bride. 
0, Maud ami Madge, dream on together, 

With never a pang of jealous fear ! 
For, ere the bitter St. Agnes weather 

Shall whiten another year, 
Robed for the bridal, .ami robed for the tomb, 

Braided brown hair and yoldeu tress, 
There 11 be only one of you left for the bloom 

Uf the bearded lips to press, — 
Only one for the bridal pearls, 

The robe of satin and Brussels lace, — 
Only one to blush through her curls 

At the sight of a lover's face. 
beautiful Madge, in your bridal white, 

For you the revel has just begnn ; 
But for her who sleeps in your arms to-night 

The revel of Life is done. 
But robed and crowned with your saintly bliss, 

Queen of heaven ami bride of the sun, 
beautiful Maud, you '11 never miss 

The kisses another hath won ! 



RUSSIA. 
The Czar is an acute observer of the times, and he knows as well as 
Gortschakoff or Bismarck when it is his cue to speak. Russia having been 
credited with dtsigns upon the peace of Europe, the Czar took an oppor- 
tunity, on the occasion of the Festival of the Knights of the Order of St. 
(.xeorire, to say something reassuring upon this point. He was therefore 
happy to be aide to state that the intimate alliance between the three em- 
pires and their three armies, founded by their august predecessors for the 
defense of their common cause, still remained intact, and that it had no 
other aim than the maintenance of the tranquility and peace of Europe. 
These words have produced a very favorable impression at Berlin. All the 
G-erman papers comment upon them at length, warmly acknowledging the 
reference contained in them to the triple alliance of the three Powers, and 
accepting them as a sure promise of peace. On this side the Channel the 
feeling is still one of suspicion " that there is something brewing'." We 
learn from St. Petersburgh that an exchange of opinions has taken place 
between the Russian Ambassador, Prince Orloff, and M. Thiers on the 
subject of the purchase of the Suez Canal shares by England. Both states- 
men appear, according to the local Gazette, much annoyed at the action 
taken by the British Government, and M. Thiers is reported to have en- 
treated Piince Orloff to spare no pains in order to induce his Government 
to enter a formal protest. Austria would never, M. Thiers is said to have 
assured the prince, venture to do anything in the Eastern question without 
Russia ; and if Russia, Austria, and France stood together, England, 
possibly supported by Germany, would be powerless. This is another view 
of a possible alliance which has not been generally contemplated, and 
which is very uncomplimentary, to say the least of it, to that " firm 
frienship" which is said to exist between the three emperors. The writer 
in the Gazette would appear to have drawn largely upon his imagination, 
and we shall no doubt have M. Thiers repudiating the suggestions which 
are attributed to him. — English Paper. 



CUTTER WHIfrKY. 

A P. lloiMltn- A «».. No. Ill JiicUhoii strrol. i,r<- the N»l« 

i ■ | ■ ; 

id • utter Old Uourl 
■ 
ipurious gradei Ulan ■ ^tau*. Hard 



i' i ii 



l 



l» M D 
PHCEVIX OIL WORK - 

Irutobllahed 1 850.— II a lo hi Ufa *v Co., Oil ami CouemlMloo 
lu Sixmo, Whali . r\ and 

liimini. i rant Mreet, & n .r iU i 3, 



A- S. ROSEVBAUM & CO. 

Have removed to the Boathesurl corner of California and 
and otlicra 
urtmenl uf Hi, II || r Brands of c ih.u I m, and SMOKING 

IX'O, HAVANA UJ 

uuer, [Oct. L8] as UOSENliAl H ft 00 



WARNER'S SALOON, 

North Bench, on Nelffffa' Wharf.--- For Fancy Dog* of purr 
bread and Kare Ufrda from ■■ 
.ill other porta oJ the world, go aad aw Mm, Taken drink. 'Hie urn. will drop rou al 

'■■ .i i 

K. r Show.] SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. [W. it. Mat 

SNOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND UANTJFACTDRERS OF 
ri'lurcs, l'r;i:iK".. Moldings, oini Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St, near Market, S. F. I •■ I t, 



RRITISH RENEVOLINT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, dally, from 10 a.m. to l p.m., by the nnder- 
■ receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating: to the Society J. P, Mod kkik, Secretary. 

Oct 23L 7.iO Mniityomerv street. 

REMOVAL. 

L. H. Xkwtox 1 NEWTON BFOTHERS & CO., fMoaara Nbwtok. 

Imi>orters anil wholesale dealers in Tens, Foreign Goods and 
Uroceries, have removed to 204 and ZOO California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifo rnia. June 7. 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL, SAN RAFAEL. 

The above named hotel will be opener) to the public on or 
about the first of May. Parties desiring ro s for the bcosou can make aiijili- 

cation ior llio same either by letter or to the undersigned at the hotel 

April 24. SAMUEL HUBBAHD, Proprietor. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE A CO., 

113 Clay and lit Commercial Streets, 

Sax Fbaxcisco. [May 24. 



ART ASSOCIATION. 

The Ninth Exhibition of the San Francisco Art Association, 
comprising L2Q Beautiful Works of Art, by Local and Foreign Artists, is now 
open to the public frum 10 a.m. to 10 P.M. Admission, 25 cents. Jan. 8. 

WIILTAM HARNEY, 
Totar.v Public and Commissioner of Deeds, northwest cor- 



N 



ner uf Montgomery and Sacramento streets, office of Madison & Burke, Si n 
Francisco. Jan. 8. 

J. B. Chapman.] [Established in 1859.] [Jons Bauer. 

CHAPMAN & 00., 
/Contractors for Xight Work.— Vaults, Cesspools, Sewers, 

\y Yards, etc : , cleaned. Sewers repaired and properly laid. Office: 313 Dupotit 



street, between Bush and Sutter, San Francisco. 



Nov. 20. 



ENGLISH BRANCHES, 

Together with French Iauguag:e and literature, tanghtby 
Prof. Dietz, Ph. D. (University of Fiance). Holder of a First-Grade Teacher's 
Certificate issued by the City and County Board of Examination, Department of Pub- 
lic Schools, San Francisco. 94(i Folsom street, near Fifth, Jan. 1. 



K. H. Lloyd.] LLOYD & NEWLANDS, [F. G. Newlands 

Attorueys-at-Law. Offices: Rooms 9 to 13, Nevada Block, 
first floor. Dec. 11. 



Fit ed' k A. Elliott. 



Johx S. Bugbee. 



Crab. Willmot. 
SWAN BREWERY COMPANY, 

Brewers anil Bottlers of the Swan Ales mid Porter. 
Brewery, Bottling- Establishment and Main Office, Southeast corner Fifteenth 
and Dolores streets, San Francisco. May 29. 

SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. 

Now on exhibition, the " Capture of the Serapis," by Mr. 
James Hamilton, together with a choice collection of European Pictures. Ad- 
mission, 2S cents. Jan. I. 

\ &%■ PRINTS IcJ 

JSJRTJCE, -537 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

J BELUW MONTGOMER Y. 

Wm. H. Stewart.] STEWART & GREATHOTFSE, [C. R. Greatdoi-se. 

Attoriicys-at-I^aw, Rooms 42, -13. 45 and 46, Nevada 
Block, San Francisco. Will practice in all the Courts of California, Nevada 
and the Territories. Dec. 11. 

C. L. Crackbon ] C A. MURDOCK & CO- C. A. Murdoch. 

Job Printers, Successors to 91. I>. Carr *1- Co., No. 532 Clay 
street, San Francisco. Cal. Feb. 3. 

STEINWAY PIANOS, 

The Rest Eeyond All Di&pute, 

At Gray's New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street. 

[July 31.] 



FURNITURE 
nd odd pieces suitable for the Holidays. All strictly new 

and custom-made. Must sell on account of removal. 
Ijec. is. GOODWIN & CO. , No. 312 Pine street. 



A 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Jan. 29, 1876. 



DR. STOUT AS A WATER " SHARP. " 
Tile Spring Valley Water Company made an effort last week to 
putt' the quality of their water, unquestionably with the view of enhanc- 
ing its value in the eyes of the Legislature and of putting up the shares. 
To this end they commissioned ano titt^dout tine Stout, physician or some 
such thing, and sent him dovn with hook and line to examine the reser- 
voirs, basins, and "plant" of the company; But it appears that Stout, 
though writing himself '"Doctor," kuows little of modern chemistry, and 
h-ss of what was expected of him by the learned President of the Spring 
Valley Company— C. Webb Howard. The Doctor began his researches, 
as usual, by fishing for trout in the company's reservoir at Pillarcitos. He 
snun hooked up the hind leg- of a dead calf, and undertaking to determine 
the character of Ids catch by the sense of smell alone, decided it to be the 
putrescent body of a rotten skunk. Believing that he had made a dis- 
covery tliat would be most pleasing to the officers and stockholders of the 
company, he hurried back to the city, ami without consulting Professor 
C. Webb Howard, announced to thewnrldtheresultof hisresearches, fully 
impressed with the belief that the stock would advance forthwith to par 
at the very least. But he was mistaken, and the company, headed by its 
shifty President, who it is admitted lias only to join Trinity Church and 
be elected vestrymanto equal the Great Babcock, have been aweek in try- 
ing to put matters right again. The discovery of the skunk in the reser- 
vnir was after all no special advantage to the stock; and, as a bulling 
measure, was a failure. For while it is well known the decomposing car- 
cass "f useful and cleanly domestic beasts like the ox, the horse, the sheep 
and the swine, have been found by the first scientists of the age to be of 
great benefit to water, by giving it tone and body, on the other hand, 
the decay of reptiles — especially rattlesnakes and vipers — and the inferior 
mammals, such as skunks, pollcats, rabits and coyotes, so far from being 
beneficial may, when too numerous and in small confined bodies of 
water subjected to the direct rays of the sun, be absolutely deleterious. 
The learned successor of Babcock saw the danger immediately, and rush- 
ing into town, hunted up the maladroit '•medico," and procured from 
him a recantation, in which he took back everything he had said, and 
said everything which he had taken back. The skunk was no skunck, 
but only an innocent and wandering opossum which was not dead at all, 
but only amusing himsef by shamming death in the interest of the Water 
Company. The Doctor had never said that dead cows were good for 
water, and besides there wasnot an animal vertebrate orinvertebratemam- 
mal,ormarsupialcow,cat, skunk, snake or guinea pig, living or dead, within 
the distance of one hundred marine leagues of auy of the Spring Valley 
Water Company's pipes, aqueducts, reservoirs, creeks or catchment sheds ; 
and never had been, and never would be, so long as grass grows <>r water 
runs. When President Howard got this recantation in type, he felt finer 
than Babcock the day hereceived the famous presentation plate. Stout is 
to be sent to the University of Gottingen, at the Water Company's ex- 
pense, in order to finish his education in chemistry and zoology. Spring 
valley stock is still held at something less than par. Pres. Howard is su de- 
lighted with his late card, that he intends to adopt literature as a pursuit. 

RICHARD W. HEATH & CO. 

It is with a reluctance, for which the public does not probably give 
us credit, that the News Litter finds itself impelled to fix geueral atten- 
tion upon any member of the community, however wilful ami deliberate 
his departure from the plain paths of business probity and fair dealing. 
There is one objection to turning the broadside of the press fairly upon 
a man. It is sure to leave a scar of more or less proportion wherever the 
attack has the smallest grain of truth to inspire it. A paper, therefore* 
that carelessly or without grave reason, focusses the scrutiny of the world 
upon an individual, criminally abuses the power stored in its hands for 
great ends. In order, therefore, that we may be impartial in our course 
towards the above firm, we would ask them preliminarily to turn to page 
104 of their individual stock ledger account of Mrs. K. Engelhardt, and 
to inform us, among other things, how they managed to sell for that cus- 
tomer fifty shares of Ophir at $56, on January 4th, when the stock re- 
ports of that day vary between S<;U(<H>4A. Also, will they explain how 
they contrived to dispose of fifty shares of Savage, on January 3rd, at 818, 
when the same authority states it to have been $22@23? Will they, in 
addition to this, acquaint us with the process by which they sold twenty 
shares of Belcher, on January 21st, at $31 50, when the lowest sales of 
that day were $33f ? When these gentlemen have completed these little 
problems in* substruction, we should like to be finally informed by what 
Bxpansion of an elastic conscience they are enabled to charge interest on 
"buyer 30" stock; and particularly by what morbid development of 
the Shylock element of their natures they have the hardihood to charge 
their customers two pt-r rent, intvre.st under any circumstances whatever? 

This firm, we are informed, has borne a fair reputation for business in- 
tegrity, and we are not anxious to believe the gentlemen who compose it 
to be the lineal descendants of the impenitent thief, so we honestly hope 
for some satisfactory explanation of the above figures, which we take from 
one of their own statements of account. If such explanation be forth- 
coming, it will save the News Letter the verbatim reproduction, in extenso, 
of what we are at present forced to consider some very remarkable speci- 
mens of bookkeeping, and a ventilation of the same in a manner that we 
are afraid will result rather disadvantageous^ to their present business. 

THE STOCK MARKET. 
The market at this writing seems to be very generally in the hands of 
a few of the larger holders, who have been operating for the past few days 
with a marked absence of any concert of action. The result has been, to 
emphasize the oft-proven maxim, that this diversity of movement on the 
part of the more considerable operators is almost sure to depress rather 
than to freshen the market. The result has lessened the speculative 
feeling in a very noticeable degree. The increased production now as- 
sured by the controllers of the two great mines will give the market a 
steady but positive upward tendency, California having already reached 
85, with, as yet, no ore extracted from it. No cross-cutting has so far 
taken place in Chollar. Hale & Nbrcross, Best & Belcher, Savage'or 
Gould & * lurry, so that the sanguine expectations in regard to these mines, 
and especially the encouraging prospects indicated in the case of the lat- 
ter, are as strong as ever. The indications are general that the market 
will remain steady for the next few weeks, so that the influx of Eastern 
capital anticipated will be invested here in time for the expected rise, 
about the middle of February. Consolidated Virginia made a sudden 
spurt of 820 yesterday. To conclude, the outlook would indicate a gradu- 
ally rising and exceptionably firm market. 



LAINE'S MUZZLE. 

There was a young party named Laine, 
Who a Senator's r< be did obtain; 

"Now," quoth he, "I .guess 
I will muzzle the Press !" 
AYfcieh proves this young party insane. 

For another young party named Roach 
Did the former young party reproach, 

Saying: "Sir, you'll be puzzled 

To get the Press muzzled, 
So on its preserves don't you poach. 

"You're the Laine, sir, that leadeth to Hell, 
Though not that of winch holy books tell, 
For I'm sure you're not nice 
Enough to entice, 
And you're narrow, not broad, sir, as well. 

"Return to Pike county with speed; 
Your Missouri your muzzle may need, 
For, sir, what the deuce 
In God's name is the use 
Of a Press where the people can't read ! 

"But here, sir, I'd have you to know 
(Here the little man's accents were low) 
The people c '" read. 
And your muzzle don't need, 
So such humbugging dodges wont go." 

THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE. 

The reign of the Abdul Aziz is a modern repetition of that of the 
last Palaeologus of the Eastern Empire, who feasted and wantoned like 
another Belshazzar whilst the invincible Saracenic hosts were advancing on 
the city of Constantine, winch was snnn to lie their own — when the hated 
symbol of the cross was to be overthrown from Saint Sophia's and the 
crescent— apt sign of the growing splendor of the Prophet's religion — sub- 
stituted in its stead, and which the valor and ambition of future leaders 
were to bear victoriously up to the walls of Vienna and unchecked over the 
Iberian plains to where the stern chivalry of Charles Martel had made their 
immovable stand and proclaimed to the Mahomedan conquest— "Thou 
shalt no farther go." The present uneasy and feverish condition of Europe 
indicates that complete preparation only is wanting for the time when the 
great powers shall advance to the Golden Horn and forever drive back the 
Mussulman horde to its ancient stronghold. Then will ensue a rectification 
of the map of Europe. Russian intrigue and Muscovite policy have long 
anticipated the time when they should adminster on the Sick Man's es- 
tate, but it is possible other claimants may grasp the coveted prize. The 
Western nations can never afford to allow such a consummation, and 
Russia will have to content herself with the incorporation of Eoumania 
and outlying provinces. The crowning of the Austrian heir apparent as 
King of Hungary is a confession that Austria is no longer a German State, 
and is a prelude to the future when all the German speaking people shall 
be~united and the house of Brandenburg' rule from the Baltic to the 
Adriatic. The various provinces of Turkey will then naturally come 
under the suzerainty of the Hapsburghs and compensate them for the \>^* 
of their ancient empire. When thisttime comes, and it may not be very 
distant, the peace and safety of Europe will requn-e the rehabilitation of 
Poland as an independent State. It is now a source of weakness to the 
governments amongst which it has been parceled out. Independent, it 
would be a barrier to Russian designs ami a source of strength in time of 
war against their encroachments. In this division of the Ottoman Empire 
there remains Egypt. If German statecraft is wise it will seek to compen- 
sate France for the Rhenish provinces by the gift of this ancient kingdom. 
France, already possessing Algeria, its future policy would lie to consolidate 
and Colonize the North African States. In effecting this, the capability of 
French colonists in assimilating with the Moorish races would be no small 
factor in the way of success. Nor would England be dissatisfied with a 
French protectorate of Egypt. The Suez passage to India would be well 
guaranteed in the hands of France, and Russian advances in Asia be sub- 
ject to the limit of the great powers of Europe. England seeks no unde- 
sirable provinces. The wealth and grandeur of India amply compensate 
her for any loss of prestige on the continent. 



LICENSING CORPORATIONS. 

We believe the banking, insurance and commercial corporations 
operating in this State, and incorporated under its laws, do now pay a 
license corresponding to that of the rest of the mercantile community, but 
mining corporations, which receive the protection of the law, as well as 
the benefit of the stock market, contribute but an insignificant mite to the 
State revenue. We suggested, some time since, the levy of a State 
license on all corporations at the annual rate of two cents per each share of 
capital stock. It is but just that those who receive the benefit of the law 
should contribute to its support. We have no desire to unjustly dis- 
criminate in this proposition, because mining companies, as a rule, indulge 
in the luxury of innumerable shares— with what purpose we all know — 
only they should pay for the luxury. The classes of eoi porations first 
mentioned, not only pay a license, but taxes on their real and personal 
property. By transferring license revenues to the State, quite a nice sum 
could be collected and applied to the redemption of the debt or to the 
school fund. If wildcat or unproductive mining companies should feel ag- 
grieved at the size of a license tax, they have the option of reducing capi- 
tal stock to a reasonable figure. In the name of common sense we protest 
against this flood of watery and swindling shares, and ask that they be 
taxed as well as other property. If it has no other effect than to bring 
them down to bedrock, a proper revenue law would be a blessing. On 
vous attend, Messimws LegisUiteurs I 

A New York exchange very considerately remarks as follows : " The 
Moody and Sankey i Committee have expended S10,000 at the Hippodrome, 
and will expend $30,000 more. Humbug ! The streets are filled with 
hungry, cold, half-dyiug wretches, for whose freezing bodies there is no aid 
or comfort. This Moody business, which pays a fat parson to pray and 
yell for a fellow's soul, ami won't give a cent toward a flannel shirt for his 
body, isn't the kind of Christianity that washes, here or hereafter.'^ 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

■ 
.1 will [lift) I. 



C\ul — 

n ifi •"it of d 

mother's 
ully Hoi 
i lone, I did ruvwlf. V itlier did 

^understanding, and 
had i! . niii have been notL' 

id by my busb L. T." 

i lip from the S ,u 
lata t! ion she must experience at 

Ihtu publicly informing mankind at large and the immediate reli I 
.1//-. .1. T. in particular, thai U a the better hoi 01 

uew all Uw while thai if waa the, and nol Ac, that did "the 
kicking, *' but it was our naturoj 

■ 
unmentionable* in this case, Perhap urate in designating 

•. of Mr. .1. T.'s mother. Mr. J. 'I'.'.- J 
-' an extensive juvenile acquaintance with that 
maternal authority, but still it a possible we were 
Perhapa the cowhide belonged to his gr&ndmothi r, or it w 
an heirloom in the family, or yet the gift sed friend. We will 

waive tlii- little point/hov ■.. | that Mrs. J. T. herself is 

not more definite in the premises. For instance, why leave the public in 
harrowing uncertainty as * kieto d her husband, la tic- reli- 

-■ d, Mr. J. T. diminutive as well i rdid his ener- 

to climb a chair to wc Bsaf ully apply the accessary 

Stf jo, how al the i \nd, finally, was Mr. 

I. T.'s ultimate design in "joining the church" to ask the praj era of the 
cation for " a person m affliction." We make this inquiry inasmuch 
.1. T.'s resolution of standing by her husband Beems involved with a 
aiding on him. 

The Town Crier is in oontinua] receipt of melancholy commmunica- 
tions, plaintively inquiring 1 wherefore he does not point tin- slow un- 
irn at various stated abuses and public nuisances. 
why he does not wet what an indignant flatterer denomi- 
nates his "vitriolic" pen in denunciation of, for instance, the venerable 
" long bit " swindle of the saloons. < >r the badly disguised sneak tbievea 
laundrymen, who exact a Bort of white-mail from their customers' 
apparel undei the Russ House, for example. He is informed, 

with almost monotonous regularity, that the circling orb of day does Dot 
look down upon n more outrageous imposition upon the forbearance of an 
: ununity than the miserable apology for a common carrier en- 
titled the North Beach Street Railway, He is implored to comment upon 
: that the cars on this line are slow : that they are traveling muse- 
ums of local insectiverous specimens that would put Harry Edwards' col- 
lection to shame ; that they are as foul as a hoodlum's mouth, and as 
■ 'ortable afl insolence and rowdyism can make them : that the stench 
of the delectable localities through which they pass are as nothing com- 
pared to their own indescribable native odor. To these unhappy cor- 
: he Tow ii < Jrier pauses to Bay that his stentorian v. .ice has 
been cracked, lo I these many years in bellowing; the changes which his 
bell has rung upon these, ami other drawbacks to a mundane existence, to 
which such trinles as these areas the molehill to the mountain. It is 
enough to discourage that first great power of civilization, the printing, 
press itself, to behold the prodcQngs and buffets that inconceivably dull 
■ public, will endure before its somnolent brain is invaded with the 

tardy impulse of kiekinir. Why doesn't some one, for example, open the 

ball by inditin »of one of these lines of movable pest-houses? 

< lr, better still, let us have the speedy, effective and beneficent ministra- 
tion of a Vigilance Committee again amongst us. Welcome, the em- 
phatic hemp and the p'-rsiiasivc lamp-post ! 

The astrologers are having the proverbially hard times of the prophet 
in his own country. These mysterious beings whom an inscrutable Prov- 
dence has end »wed with the constitutional aversion to soap, and a power 
of making everybody's fortune in stock except their own, are aggrieved 
that the Board of Supervisors has refused their petition to be relieved of 
the yresent $50 tax. It would naturally occur to the uninitiated in the 
solution of the complex difficulties that surround the " dark-haired gentle- 
man and the light-haired lady" that this municipal hardtieartedness 
might have been foretold. It is only fair, however, to assume that the 
planets in their courses refuse to risk their mundane reputations upon the 
movements of that vagarious body known as "the Board." In the debate 
concerning this material request from these branch offices of the devil, the 
report says : "Mr. Gibbs hoped the tax would be trebled, for the so-called 
fortune-teller and clairvoyants were trafficking in the ignorance of poor 
deluded creatures. He said, 'As far as a big petition is concerned. I can 
go out myself and in two hours procure twice that number of names to a 
petition asking for the hanging ox every member of this Board. They aw 
worse than the hoodlums, and I believe a large part of the prostitution in 
San Francisco and other cities is brought about by these very seers.*" 
That the Supervisors are worse " than the hoodlums may be generally 
admitted, but the rest of Mr. Gibb's assertions has as yet been only sus- 
pected. As far as the hanging sentiment of the city is concerned, how- 
ever, he is painfully correct., 

Mr. Press-Gag Laiue can now claim to have experienced all the 
satisfactory fulness of sensation attendant upon the act of butting one's 
head against a stone wall. The Town Crier had marked the approach of 
this unsophisticated lamb to the slaughter with the same species of secret 
exultation that illumines the contemplative spider noting the advance of 
the unwary blue-bottle. That there should be found, among all the tire- 
BOme ranks of devoted idiots at Sacramento, even one willing to take his 
political life in his hand, and gratuitously lay himself forever open to the 
Blmgs and arrows of the press, was of itself a piece of good fortune too 
great for description. Such a chance to put on the metaphorical thumb 
screws and apply the molten lead peculiar to the Town C'riir's gentle craft 
does not often occur. But as the school-boy saves the red side of the 
apple for the last, so the Town <>/>■>• foregoes the dissection of Mr. Laine's 
I '■ < ri'ul idiocy for a time, in order that he may figuratively tile anew his 
duriug -ii-'. ia ,t awhile over so unusually appetizing a meal. 



Mr. Undertaker McGinns frJ to our 

Ii, from Mr, Wei i 
for di-p.it i..I -pin!-, and which contains the united profanity and 
it Dyntax of ■■ Manny « itusuns," The i 
■ 
for whose domolii i 

i ■ | ! , I , 

informt d, ■■-. ii h cru hii un will omil 

i when h<- obli i 
1 1 we could hai e M r. Jimn 
■ band ■ ; " ■ to tin I effi ■ t, we ihould Fe< l ■ 

world ii wu 
ol that horrible " om< thin ■Mi," the postmortem 

attention J Mel rinn. Finally, it ma} av< hi pi 

performer upon the last trump Borne unnecessary business Boficitude to 
state that the Mr. Murray above mentioned was a gentleman Formerly 

■■I with a stupid book entitled the "English ( framm 
died a very long time ago indeed io long that his present resurr 
h oul i result in veiy small dividends Indeed. 

M. Ragoullit, of til-- French Academy, lias just read a paper before 
that bod) promidgating the scientific fact that early in the year 2086 V D, 
a tidal wave "ill submerge this entire coast, and extend a hundred and 
• ighty miles inland, [t is well to take time by the forelock in such little 
re, and we then-fore announce that the publication offioe of this 
paper will be removed to the top story of the shot tower, corner of First 
and Howard streets, in the early part, of the next century but one. A- it. 
i- desirable to save the lives of our most eminent citizens first the ball on 
the extreme top will be exclusively devoted to the writer of this column 
and his dog (this dog is very savage) during the wetness referred to. "No 
( Ihinese need apply." An experienced corps of sw immers have been en- 
gaged as carriers, and th llection department will be in charge of * 'apt. 

Boynton and Michael Reese. A submarine cable will connect this, office 
with the steamboat landing on the Palace Hotel roof. No fish taken for 
subscriptions. Reporters arc expected to furnish their own skiffs add 
diving armor. Correspondents are requested to see that bottles contain- 
in; contributions are tightly corked. For the largest number of subscrip- 
tions to any address a. superb ehroiuo of the oebige will be presented, or an 
■I ^ant rosewood raft, if preferred. Now is the time to get up clubs ! 

The Spring Valley Water Company must expect the immediate 
dei laration of a vendetta between that corporation and every professional 
quill driver in the city. It is not so much the fact of its' dispensing a 
liquid that is more than suspected of containing certain disturbing and 
unsavory constituents. The fraternity (we regret to say) has a profound 

disregard for the bibular recommendations of the aqi is fluid; but the 

course of this company has certainly corrupted to like impositions that 
other combination of thieves controlling the Gas Company. Water we 
can do without while fortified by the cheering contiguity of the consoling 
grog-shop, but to deprive the newspaper scribe of the privilege of wasting 
the midnight gas is a more serious matter. The miserable mockery that 
is supplied by this last company at extortionate rates, the flow of which 
droops mysteriously off with clockwork regularity at certain hours of the 
night— suggests the gloomy but endurable thought of the outer darkness 
prepared tor the wretches that sell the same. 

The Sheriff of Alameda county is obviously emulative of our own 
immortaljimmy McGinn's insidious attempt to bring about the millen- 
nium in thirty days without grace, play or pay. He sends us what we are 
bound to admit is a must admirable bill looking to the institution of a 
Special State Detective Force, but which has probably about the same 
chance of passing the Legislature as that remarkable body has of passing 
through the Golden Gates of the Celestial San Francisco. Let no one 
imagine, however, that the Town Crier is about to crack the ring-master's 
whip or assume the cap and bells on this subject. There is not a single 
scintilla of fun in the dismal reflection that murder, rape, robbing, vio- 
lence and every species of outrage and infamy flourish like the green bay 
tree in our midst, while our State government (God save the mark !) and 
our municipal powers that be look on with apparent listless apathy. Un- 
mistakably there is honor among thieves. 

It would have been a little decent at the funeral of Benjamin P. 
Avery had our Christian brother Stebbins refrained from insulting the 
Chinese merchants who were temporarily his divine Master's guests. To 
speak of them as an uninspired, lifeless mass was scarcely polite, and refer* 
ence to their overflowing the Pacific coast as a deluge — like punishment 
permitted b,y the Almighty — was really hardly delicate. These fat ser- 
vants of God, who get by stipends for whining out dictates to the Su- 
preme Being which they call prayers, evince occasionally as much sensi- 
tiveness and fineness of organization as may be looked for in the wart of a 
rhinoceros, or the legendary porcine silk purse; and when brother Stone 
followed with a prayer, as like the humility of his Lord as a bad oyster is 
to a twelve carat diamond, the effect on every sensible heart was to 
make it cry feebly, " Thank God, I'm infernally wicked !" 

The Royal Chinese Temple of Thespia, in the delectable locality 
that smells to heaven under the designation of Chinatown, is becoming a 
den of thieves to an extent that feebly but measurably reminds the hap- 
less visitor of the City Hall. We do not believe this to be directly the 
fault of the Chinese proprietors of this place, but it seems that these 
guileless children of the Occident have fallen into the hands of about the 
most hang-dog and disreputable looking lot of vampires, and that run the 
place entirely for their own peculiar benefit and profit. The minor fea- 
ture of insulting such members of the press as happen to visit this theater 
in company with newly arrived friends is a small matter comparatively, 
but to patiently endure the rudeness and profanity of the gang of cut- 
throats that hang around its doors for the privilege of seeing them coolly 
pocket "the property of their benighted employers, is rather too much for 
the endurance of the average ( 'aucasian. 

"Some Mussulmans in Cauada having prevented Christians from 
entering a church, a contest arose, in the course of which about twenty 
persons are said to have fallen on both sides." This remarkable piece of 
information we clip from the Bulletin of last Monday. It is rather a re- 
lief to a student of the fearfully and wonderfully constructed grammar 
of the Bulletin to behold its aspiring pens at length essay the alluring 
field of geography. We hazard the inference that the chief danger to 
these Canadian Mussulmen lies, as of old, in the jaw bone of an ass. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Jan. 29, 1«76 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten Thousand at Home 
and Abroad. 



C. P. R. R. 



The Prince's Interview with the Native 
Princes. — The Maharajah of Dodhpoor refuses 
precedence to any chief, and he looks a Rajpoot 
all over. The Maharajah <>f Jeypoor, who suc- 
ceeded, was a very different -style of man. He 
is very liberal and enlightened, losing somewhat 
in impressiveness of aspect by a large pair of 
spectacles which he wears ; but he ranks high in 
the estimation of the Government and the na- 
tives, the Rajpoot family having given a daugh- 
ter in marriage to the Emperor of India, claiming 
descent from Kama, some indefinite period before 
Christ. The Maharajah has nine wives, but no 
children. He rules over two millions of people 
and 15,000 square miles of territory. He is char- 
itable, mild, proud, and dignified. The Maha- 
raja of Cashmere next arrived, preceded by cui- 
rassiers, accoutred in the fashion of the French 
Empire, forming a magnificent cortege. His in- 
terview with the Prince was very agreeable. He 
and his Firdars wore the Sikh head-dress and 
were ablaze with jewels. He had been with diffi- 
culty persuaded to cut down his gifts from £50,- 
000 to £5,000 in value. He is making thirty 
miles of new road for the Prince, and declares 
that he has no further wish in life now. His ap- 
pearance and bearing secured good will. He 
produced a most favorable impression ; but with- 
out drawing any odious comparison, it may be 
said that Scindia, the Maharajah of Grwalior, 
who succeeded in order, excited more interest on 
account of his well-known character. His cortegt 
was very tine. He can handle a division of the 
three arms better than most generals, and is al- 
together a man of marked ability and courage. 
To all the chiefs the Prince gave gold medals of 
commemoration. But now pi-ace mix damee. From 
a closed brougham alighted a figure closely veil- 
ed. Beneath a robe and close-fitting trowsers 
pretty feet stole in anil out. Another figure fol- 
lowed. The screen before the eyes was too thick 
to be pierced, but the Begum of Popal saw every 
thing. She is not yet forty years of age. She 
seemed bowed down, but her daughter, not yet 
eighteen, walked just as feebly. It is often such 
women as these who rule native States from the 
seclusion of Zenana. The Prince received the 
veiled ladies most graciously. They did not un- 
veil, but it is said they are fair to see. After the 
Begum retired — quite delighted it is said— came 
the Maharajah of Rewah, whose fine turn-out 
reflected credit on Mr. Baunermann, the political 
agent. He is a Rajpoot, and a Sanscrit scholar, 
but speaks English. He is also a tiger hunter. 
He has power of life and death, except over Brit- 
ish subjects, and rules over 13,000 square miles, 
with a population of two millions. Out of £250,- 
000 of revenue more than one half is alienated to 
jaghires, religious and charitable grants. His 
Sirdars were, perhaps, more picturesque than 
any. 

His Royal Highness the Duke of Con- 
naught and the party of officers who accompanied 
him on a boar-spearing expedition to Morocco, in 
the neighborhood of Tangier, returned to Gibral- 
tar in his j'acht Vega on the 9th. The expedition 
was most successful, twelve wild pigs being killed 
in two days. His Royal Highness went to Tan- 
gier on the invitation of Sir John Drnmmoud 
Hay, British Minister to the Court of Morocco, 
to whose excellent arrangements and organization 
the success of the excursion is due, and his Royal 
Highness was most fortunate in taking part in 
this description of sport under the auspices of 
such an experienced sportsmen The Duke and 
party thoroughly enjoyed the excursion, which 
was attended by no casualties except among the 
horses, three of whom where wounded by the 
tusks of the boars at bay, the horse ridden by Sir 
John Hay being one of the number. 

The Turkish papers announce that the third 
wife (Kadine) of the Sultan died on the 13th ult. 
at the Old Seraglio at Top-Capou, after an illness 
of a month's duration. Her highness was buried 
towards evening in the mausoleum of Sultan 
Mahmoud, near the ''Burnt Column" in Stam- 
boul. 

The Emperor of Russia will shortly visit 
France to conduct the Empress to Mentone, and 
not to San Remo, as had been reported. The 
Emperor will remain three days in Paris in the 
strictest incognito before proceeding to Mentone. 

The rumor that Count Corti would be ap- 
pointed Italian minister in London is now said 
to be premature. 

Queen Isabella is suffering from an attack of 
measles, caught from her daughters, who are now 
convalescent. 



Commencing Sunday, Jan. 23d, 1876, and until 

further notice, Trains and Boats will 

Leave Sau Francisco : 



7f\(\ A.M. (Sundays excepted), Vallejo Steamer (fro: 
. W Broadway Wharf)— (Join lecting at VlRlejo wit 



[rum 
r "harf)— Connecting at VSllejo with 
trains fur Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento, 
"making close connection at Napa with stuyes for So- 
noma." (Arrive S:55 p.m.) 



U i\i\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic, Cx press Train (via Oak- 
'-'• 1 -'V/ land) for Sacramento,' Marysvillc. Redding and 
Portland (U.), Colfax, Reno, Ugdcn and Omaha. Con- 
nects at Niles with trains arriving at San Jose 12::;.". P.M. 
(Arrive 5:35 P.M.) 

H dlO A ' M * ( Su "days only), Vallejo Steamer (from 
u *"" Broadway Wharf), connecting at Vallcju witn 
trains for Calistojja and Sacramento, and at Napa with 
stages for "Sonoma." (Arrive 6:55 P.M.) 



SOUTHERN PA0IPI0 EAILK0AD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION. 
WIXTEB ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Sunday, Docember 26th, 
lS7o, Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco, 
from Passenger Depot on Townsend street, between 
Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 

7(\f\ A.M. (daily), for Bcrnal, San Miguel, Colma, 
■W Baden and San Bnmo._ 

Q QA A.M. (daily), for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, 
^ .»JV/ xrc^ Pinoa, Pojaro, iSaliiKis, Soiedad and all 
Way Stations, Stage connections made with this train, 

n^A A.M. (daily), for San Mateo and Way Sta- 
•*J*J tions. 



O ()() P.M. (daily) C. P. R. R. San Jose Passenger 
*J*\J\J Train (via Oakland Ferry), stopping at all Way 
(Arrive 0:35 A.M.) 



Stations. 



_|_ HA P.M. (daily) Passenger Train (via Oakland 
^•W Ferry), toStocktou only, connecting at Lathrop 
with Express Train for Merced, Visalia, Sumner, Caliente 
and Los Angeles ; also at Niles with train arriving at 
San Jose 6:55 p.m. (Arrive 12:40 i' m.) 

J A A P.M. (Sundays excepted), Vallejo Steamer (from 
^•Vv Broadway Wharf), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Arrive 11:10a.M.) 



-4- 00 **'**' (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
^£«"v/ (from Broadway Wharf), touching at Benicia 
and Landings on the Sacramento Ri\er. Taking the 
overland third class passengers to connect with train 
leading Sacramento at 9:00 a.m., daily. 
'(Arrive S:00 r. m. ) 



OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA FERRY. 

From Sax Francisco to Oakland.— " Daily"— 7:00, 
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 11:00 A. si. ; 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 3:30. 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30. (J:00, 0:30, 7:00,8:10. 
9:20 and 10:30 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "— U:10 a.m. 
and 11:45 p.m. "Sundays only "—10:30 and 11:30 a.m. ; 
12:30 and 1:30 P.M. 

From Sax Fraxcusco to Alameda.—" Daily "—7:00, 
8:00, 9:00 and 10:00 a.m. ; 12:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 0:00 and 
10:30 p.m. " Sundays only"— 11:00 A.M., and 1:30 p.m. 

From Sax Francisco to Fernside. — "Daily, except 
Sundays "—7:00, 9:00 and 10:00 A.M. ; 5:00 and 10:30 P.M. 

From Sax Fraxcisco to Brooklyn.—" Daily "—7:30, 
8:30 and 9:30 A.M. ; 1:00,3:30,4:30,5:30, 0:30, 7:00, 8:10 
and 9:20 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—0:10, 11:00 A.M., 
and 11:45 p.m. " Sundays only " — i0:30, 11:30 a.m., and 
12:30 p.m. 

From Brooklyn to San Francisco.— " Daily"— 6:40, 
7:40, S:40, 9:40 and 10:40 a.m. ; 12:40, 2:40, 4:40, 5:40, 6:40, 
7:50, 9:00 and 10:10 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays'"— xlO 
and 5:50a.m. "Sundays only" — 11:40 a.m., and 1:25 p.m. 

From Alameda to San Francisco.— "Daily "—7:00, 
8:03 and 9:00 a.m. ; 3:00, 3:58, 5:00, 6:03 and 7:00 p.m. 
" Daily, except Sundays "— 5:U0, 5:40, 11:30 A.M., and 1:30 
p.m. "Sundays only "--10:00, 11:00 a.m. ; 12:00 and 1:00 
P.M. 

From Fernside to San Francisco.— "Daily, except 
Sundays "--0:55, 8:00 and 11:05 a:m. ; 3:55 and 0:05 p.m. 

From Oakland to San Francisco.— " Daily "- 6:50, 
7:20, 7:50, 8:25, 8:50,9:20,9:50, 10:50 and 11:50 a.m. ; 12:50. 
2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 0:30, 0:50, 7:20, 8:00, 
9:10 and 10:20 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—5:20, (1:00 
a. U-, and 1:50 p.m. "Sundays only"— 10:20 and 11:20 
a.m. ; 12:20, 1:20 and 1:35 p.m. 

OVERLAND TICKET OFFICE, at New Ferry Land- 
ing, foot of Market street. 

T. H. GOl >DMAN, Gen. Pass and Ticket Agt. 

A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



O k ) "^ P.M. daily (Sundays excepted), for San Jose, 
*J.**tJ Gilroy and Way Stations. 



1 At l P.M. (daily), for San Jose and Way Stations. 
(") I ( ) P ' M ' ( dail - y )' for San Mateo V* d Wa .v Stations. 



&5T Extra Train on Sundays Discontinued- 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent, San Francisco._ 



LOS AXGXf.EK DIVISION. 

Until connection is made between the Northern Divi- 
sion and Los Angeles Divisio% passengers for point* on 
the Los Angeles Division of the road will take the cars 
of the Central Pacific Railroad, via Oakland, at 4 p.m. 
daily for Tulare, Tipton, Delano, Poso, Lerdo, Sumner 
and Caliente ; thence by Telegraph Stage Line via Teha- 
chapi Pass to San Fernando (98 miles only), and by 
Southern Pacific Railroad for Los Angeles, Compton and 
Wilmington; for Florence, Downey. N'orwalk, Costa and 
Anaheim— 100 miles from San Diego ; and for San Ga- 
briel, Monte, Puente, Spadra, Cucanumga, Colton. 
Mound City and San Gorgonia Summit and making 
stage connections for all principal points in Arizona and 
New Mexico. 

Note. -It is anticipated that by the 1st of February 
next the road will he in* operation to White Water and 
Dos Palms -within 85 miles of the Colorado River. 

L\ K. HE WITT, Superintendent, Los Angeles. 

J. L. WILLCUTT, GenT Passenger and Ticket Agent, 
San Francisco. Dec 25, 



S. F. & N. P. R. R. AND STEAMERS. 

(Ihan^e of Time.— On air.l after Mon- 
j day, November 15th, the steamer JAMES M Dl >N- 
AKUL", Captain W. Warner, will leave Green-street 
wharf, daily (Sundays excepted), at 2:30 o'clock p.m. ; 
connecting at Donahue Landing with cars for Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa, Fulton, Healdsburg, Litton's, Clovcrdale and 
intermediate places. The train will leave Clovcrdale 
daily (Sundays excepted), connecting with steamer at 
Donahue for San Francisco. No more Sunday trips un- 
til further notice. Close connections made with stages 
on the arrival and departure of trains for Sonoma City, 
thi." Geysers, Ska^gs, Mark West and Highland Springs. 
Also, point Arena. Seba>topul, Uodega, Duncan's Mills, 
Flsk's Mills, Gualala, Clear Lake, Lakeport, Ukiah, Lure- 
ka, Mendocino, Pine Flat, Petrified Forest and Quicksilver 
mines. Freight received from 7 a.m. till 4 p.m. For all 
information, apply at General Office, 420 Montgomery st. 
P. DONAHUE, President. 

F. H. GERDES, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

General Office : 42t> Montgomery st., S. F. Sept. 18. 



ALFRED PARAF. • 

Analytical ami Consulting Chemist. 
Assaying of all kinds of Ores, etc. Quantitative 
and Qualitative Analysis made at short notice. A 
Specialty made of Bleaching, Dyeing, and Printing of 
every description of Textile Fabrics and Yarns. Office— 
Room 1, over London and San Francisco Bank, corner 
LeidesdoriT and California streets. Laboratory— At 
Golden City Chemical Works, corner 7th and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco, California. Office Hours : Every- 
day from 12 to 2 o'clock, where MR. PAKAF is ready to 
negotiate for the sale of his numerous Patented Inven- 
tions. Balance of time at Laboratory. MR. ALFRED 
PARAF is a Pupil and Scientific Associate of Dr. Paul 
Schutzenberger, Professor of CJfcemistry and Chief of the 
Chemical Department of the College of France, Paris. 

REFERENCES (by permission) : Milton S. Latham, 
Manager London and San Francisco Bank (Limited); J. 
C. Duncan, Sec. Pioneer Land and Loan Association ; A. 
J. Bryant, Vice-President State Investment Insurance 
Company; H. P. Wakelee, Manager Golden City Chemi- 
cal Works; W. F. McNutt, M.D. ; Dr. Charles F. Chan- 
dler, Dean of Columbia College Mining School, New 
York City ; Dr. Paul Schutzenberger, College of France, 
Paris. Jan. 23. 



JOSEPH CUKLE, 
Accountant, 

No. 513 Moiilsomery »(rert, 
San Fruireiweo, <':tl. [Feb.", 



TAKE THE OLD LINE 

For Eureka, Humbolilt Bay, arriving: 
in twenty-four hours. Only one night at sea. The 
staunch iron steamship PELICAN, 800 tons, Jas. Carroll 
Commander, will leave for the above ports, from Folsom 
street wharf, on WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12. at 9 o'clock a.m. 
BEN HOLLADAY, JCN., Agent, 
May 8. 123 California street. 



THE NEW DAVIS' SEWING MACHINE. 

Among: the grandest achievements of 
modern science is the invention of the DAVIS' 
VERTICAL FEED SEWING MACHINE. It is con- 
structed on an entirely different principle from all others, 
and is not controlled by any combination. The Feed 
used in the manufacture of all other Sewing Machines, 
and known to be the property of a combination, in *t/c- 
ce8sfuUydix/>laced,a.t\d'&more simple, durable, and pow- 
erful Feed, that contains FOUR-FIFTHS less machinery 
than is required for the old feed, takes its place. It is 
the only machine having an Automatic Robin Wjnder. 
Energetic and responsible Agents wanted in all unoccu- 
pied territory. For further information, circular, and 
terms, address THE DAVIS - SEWING MACHINE COM- 
PANY, IIS Post street, San Francisco. Sept. 25. 



REDUCTION OF BATES OF FREIGHT TO 
PORTLAND. 

Freight on Merchandise to Portland on 
Oregon Steamship Company's steamers REDUCED 
TWO DOLLARS PER TON until further notice.. 
May 29. WM. NORRIS. Agent. 



TEETH SAVED ! 

Filling Teeth a Specially. — Great p:ttiei;ee 
extended to children. Chloroform administered, 
and teeth skillfully extracted. After ten years constant 
practice, I can guarantee satisfaction. Prices moder- 
ate. OlQce— iJJO Sutter street, above Montgomery. 
June >i. DR. MORFFEW, Dentist, 



C. MAIN. E. n. WINCHESTER. 

MAIN & WINCHESTER. 

»ii|if>('!unTn nixl Inifiorti-i'M ol~ II:: it os. 

Saddles, Bridles, Whips, Collars, Saddlery Ware, 
etc., Nos. - £14 and aid Battery street. San Francisco. 
N. B.— A good assortment of Concord Stage Harness 
constantly on hand. Sept. 12. 



M 



OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Regular Steamers to Portland, leaving: 
San Francisco weekly— Steamers J. L. STEPHENS, 

ORIFLAMME, and AJAX, connecting- with steamers to 
SITKA and PL'CET SOUND, and O. andC. R. R. Co. and 
Oregon C. R. R. Co. through .Willamette, Umpqua, and 
Rogue River Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points on 
the O. and C, R. R. sold at reduced rates. Sailing Days : 
Saturdays at 10 o'clock a. si. 
June 14. WM. NORRIS, Agent, 210 Battery <*~ 



Sob 
Nov 



Jan. ±K 1876.1 



CALIPORNTA ADVERTISER, 



11 



NUTAB1LIA. 



Here's a hint tot th« punish) 

b editor unit- iiuii.i. . iir.i in 

>l niiUotinca that it would bo a good joke to turn them 

follow them around ana jab them when they 

K|»oct it. 'I'll, man -iii|>i.i i .■: tli.- most tli 

and utexpenatv* lundi in the citj can I"- hnd at tin- "Criterion," No, 210 

■■1.1 be tr. ad >i i ■ r tin- lame wm . 



Philadelphia appears for tin- nonce t«> have thrown "tT her 
Quaker apparel, ana to have ushered in the Centennial with muofa 

nerable old Lady endeavoring to execute some difficult steps in the 
l*he fact that the Centenadelphia turniture makers are tel- 

M, P. i'.|,', No. Li' 1 ' r.ii^'n rtreet, for permission t.< copybia 
beautiful deafens, show plainly tin* effort! they are making t<- have i re- 
■pectable disjuay in tb;it tine at tin- Efixpt 



She ■was as pretty a Little bundle <>f calico as tin- Hill City can boast, 
and as modesl as a violet withal. So when her big cousin, throwing hi* 
foot over the back "t" the chair, said saucily, " You can't ■!" that." she 
bloahed with embarrassment. Hut after he went out she nearly ripped 

her pin-hack in trying to make her Little taover 

the back of that chair and she Bucoeeded, tun. Vitkabwrg a 



A young lidy Living in the Western Addition says that if n cart' 
« heel has nine felloes? attached to it. it's a pity that a girl like her cant 
have "in-. We'll see if the young lady taut be Bpuken to. Wheel we never. 
Nothing on wheels nowadays i> considered complete unless it is impelled 
u adorned by some "f Main $ Winchesters elegant harness. The 
forlornest old equine anatomy resembles an Arab bard in their 'rigs." 

Call at 214 Battery street and see for yourself. 



A Western debating society has been struggling with the question, 
" Do bors or girls moke the most noise?* 1 It was finally <leci<i^l that 
'* they do, " after an elaborate argument, showing that half of the noise 
boys pq ised by girls. Half the noise made by "the boys" 

in this vicinity is the result of their not, unfortunately, confining them- 
selves to the pure ami unheadaehing liquors sold by (ieor^e Hamlin, 412 
street. 

She wanted her better half to Btep inside the store ami " take just one 
littl e peep at that lovely sealskin Bacque." He hesitated and was, lost. 
When they came out she was radiant in the new garment, and his race 
was as Ion.,- as your arm. 

"How to Make Home Happy." — Sninemnn doit by staying at home 

and BOme by going away. A more effectual way than either is to heat it 
thoroughly this cold weather by one of the new fuel-saving furnaces, to 
il only at I)e La Montanya's, Jackson, helow Battery. He has 
tin- largest stock of kitchen hardware east of New York, and the cheap- 
est, which is another point, as the soldier said when he was bayoneted in 
tht- rear. 

A correspondent writes to inquire what means can be employed to 
prevent potatoes from being attacked by potato bugs. We van think of 
nothing more effectual than having them watched by a police officer during 
ij and locking them up in one of Hall's Safes over night. Nothing 
put into Hall's ever gets tampered with. No burglar grows fat in a com- 
munity that uses them universally. 

E. A. Sotheni is no exception to the rule that " no man is a hero to his 
valet." He has just caused the arrest of that individual for purloining his 
letters. There is said to be a woman in the case. 



My love is like the red, red rose 
That's newly blown in June ; 



My love is like the melody 
That's sweetly played in tune. 



If, in addition to this, the poet's love was like a melody played on one 
of Ballet & Davis Pianos, we can excuse bis infatuation. Wm. G-. Badger, 
No. 13 Sansome street, is the agent. 



Nothing of the kind is apprehended at present, but if Mrs. Twain 
should lie called away we hope that she will leave her Mark in the world. 
A distinguishing mark of the genuine connoisseur in liquors is the fact that 
his side-board contains only the brands sold by A. P. Hotaling, 431 Jack- 
son street. They are the veritable " Semper idem." 



Florida sportsmen are much annoyed in their hunting excursions 
now. They can't shoot at anything without danger uf bringing down an 
ex-politician on a health -restoring trip. 

A correspondent says that James Gordon Bennett has a fine form. 
Six hundred thousand dollars a year is a pretty figure. To have a pretty 
figure one should begin at the beginning and have his boots made by that 
artist in leather, Charles Dietles, 235 Bush street. " Bootee and beauty " 
is his motto. 

Cure for Cough or Cold. — As soon as there is the slightest uneasiness 
of the Chest, with difficulty of breathing, or indication of Cough, take 
during the day a few " Brown's Bronchial Trodies." 



" Do nothing in a hurry," exclaims a would-be philosopher; of what 
use would such a rule lie to a fellow catching fleas. One thing every one 
Should do in a hurry, istogo at once to Bradley & Rulofson's Gallery, 
and have one of their just invented medallion convex photographs taken. 
They are the most striking and stylish pictures yet produced. 

Joues, in a hurry, stumbled off an apothecary's step, and only saved 
himself from falling into the gutter by clutching at a street lamp. He said 
it seemed as if he were always going from pillar to post. If he had been 
going to post an order for rive tons more Wellington coal, his hurry 
would have been excusable. Berryman & Doyle are the agents. 

The value of punctuation can be seen from the following, which was 
hung out from a certain butcher shop in Oakland a few days ago, by the 
proprietor thereof : " Gone to slaughter some one wishing meat call at the 
Brewery." 



The Detroit Free Press man » an'* to knn 
gel undei the bed every night And the fellows wl 

si hi Tli. world i-* 
chock full of n, i , i n,, myaj 

opposite the P arly four times as much clothing as an) 

in San Francisco, Style, quality and cheapness will telL 

At an up-town funeral, the other day. a friend of the deceased ap- 
peared an- 1 deposited in ti.,' coffin a Rask of genuine old I 
whisky, from V. & l\ .1. Cassin, No, S23Fron1 Rtreet. Beapologi: 
[f st, Peter don't let bun through on his virtues, In- maj 
Per spirit medium he received yesterday the foil 
gram: " Arrived Bare ; tell Cassin I" 



Now Theodore Tilton propi to Chicago to live, Even 

m to have torn d dov d Theodore'f red li 
regard for ftp] ■ trances, 

A musical magazine notes the fact that plump women are likely to 
I lie best singi rs, This may be, but the fan remains 
in bony women the articulation u more distinct. The articulation we pre- 
fer is thai which embodies a request to "step round to< 'orville'a " and dis- 
cuss a Saddle Rook Roaefc < torviUe's Saloon, on Pine, above Mont . 
Btreet, is the gathering of our a runnels. 



Since Dr. Stout's hair bristling report anent Spring Valley, the sale 
of Napa s..da has in' reased nearly eighteen thousand bottles a week. 



A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE S. F. STOCK AND EX- 
CHANGE BOARD. 

colt, ih.am: President. 

C. H. no.XYXdi:- - tirr-frrs-t. 

r. i.a w rax - Secretary, 

Ji. BT. COXT Chairman. 

Austin, Alexander 

Budd, W. U 44U California st. 

Burling &Bro 8S8 California st. 

Boswell, S. B 307 California t-x. 

Cahil', E 4uii Montgomery st. 

Charles, H. A 408 Montgomery si. 

Cops, Uhler & Co Montgomery at. 

Coll Deane No. 16, Nevada Block. 

Eyre ( E E 311 Montgomery st. 

Glover, G. F. M 480 California et. 

Greenebaum, J 418 California st. 

Hassey, F. A 402 Montgomery et. 

Hart, Henry 412 Montgomery st. 

Hall, Ed. T 410 California st. 

Herr, J.J 411 California st. 

Hooker, B- C 426 Montgomery st. 

Jones, J. H 5U9 California et. 

Keene, J. R 486 California st. 

King, Jos. L 406!a California et. 

Lyneh, J HO Leidoedorff st. 

Latham, J as. H-. ...'..411 California *t. 
Marina, E. J. De S,, with I. Glazier 

& Co 426 Montgomery st. 

Noble, H. H 435 California st. 

Peckham, E. P 413 California st. 

Parker, W. C 112 Leidesdorff et. 

Perry, Jr., Jno lOli Leidesdorff st. 

Shawhan, J. E 432 Montg'y sf. 

Sherwood, B. F 406# California et. 

Schmieden, Hochstadter & Co 

401 California st. 

Smiley, G. W 444 CaHforn ia st. 

Shotwell, J. M 311 Montgomery st. 

Turnbull, W 4103* California st. 

Wakefield, S B 503 California et. 



A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE PACIFIC STCCK EX- 
CHANGE BOARD. 

E. J. HALJiU J.\ Preatfcfc ><r. 

GEO. s. ixmui: -- nce-Preef. 

a. < . HICKOX Treasurer. 

A. ./. moi iin;n Heeretary. 

JT08. tilukx Chairman. 

Baldridge, M 

Barton, Robert 

Berry, F. u 418 Montgomery et. 

Bourne, J. B 116 Halleck at. 

DeGreayer, S 308 Sansomest. 

Dodge, George S 

Finlayson, J. R Pacific Exchange 

Building, Halleck street. 

Hickox, A, A Halleck's Building. 

Hearst, George 

Hoight, Ira G 421 Montgomery st. 

Hunt, J.L 300 Sun some st. 

Lent, William M 

Marks, Joseph 

Mauldin, Hugh 

Moulder, A.J 

Martin, M. S 307 California st. 

McCoppin, F 32li Montgomery .at. 

Moroney, Paul 8 Halleck st. 

Nash, J 405,^ California st. 

Neal, t harles S 

Palmer, E. F 413 California st. 

Plummer, H. W 

Riolte, E.N 

Rich. Dave 422 Montgomery st. 

Sanborn, T. G 

Sutro, Gustave 

Swift, Frank 

Smiley, T. J. L 314 Montgomery st. 

Taylor, A. C... -411 H Car's st., room 2. 

Tyng, Geo 30!) Cal'a st., rooms 8-9. 

Van N ess, 1 nomas C 

Willard, G H 309 California st. 



A CARD. 

Ttie Pacific Jockey Club return thanks to their fellou-citi- 
zena and the public tor the very liberal support given to their efforts to bring 
to this State a large number of the best thoroughbred horses. In evidence of their 
success, it is only necessary to read the names of the stars now here. Such a splendid 
field of horses the world has never seen. The benefit to the State and city derived 
from these annual exhibitions is well understood by every intelligent person. The 
mammoth purses given by California has obtained a world-wide celebrity, and the in- 
terest in the approaching event was never equaled in the annals of the turf. The suc- 
cess of this enterprise is something of which every citizen may justly feel proud. 
The Club, on behalf of their fellow-citizens, extend a cordial welcome to those gentle- 
men who have brought their horses and retinue of attendants thousands of miles, at 
an expense of overtf20,000, to take part in the "Carnival," and speak for them a 
" fair field " and no favor, and may the best horse win. A. J. BttYANT, Pres. 
Jo ns Maktix, Secretary. XnM-inber 0. 

WANTED, 

By a young man, a situation as Book-keeper, or auy light 
work be is capable of doing. Good letters of recommendation from his last 
employers. [Jan. 8.] ALFRED QUKREY, Fostoffice, S. F. 



CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 1850.] 

[m porters of Teas and East India Goods, >'ns. 213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

JOSEPH GIILOTT'S SJEEL PENS. 
old by all Stationers throng-bout the World . Sole Agent 

for the United States : MR. HENRY OWEN, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 10. 



$ 



OFFICES OF AERIAL STEAM NAVIGATION CO., 

No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Jan. 29, 1«76. 



LIES OF THE DAT—Continued 
JYi ws Letti r to be read in the family circle. -—That Sweeny ever talked 

anybody to death. That he sleeps with that yellow hound. That Eten 

Gardner 1 works for hia board for the glory of the position. Thafche ever will 
be ;i partner.-— That .Jesse Cope sandpapers the bottoms of his feet 
whenever he imagines h ■ is growings-— Tfltit the postmaster's family is 

increasing. That he has discarded his eye-glasses tor goggles. That 

knows how to handle a corpse. That he ever washes his hands 
after doing so. That live corpses suit his taste best.— —That H. Krone s 

whiskers are faultless. That Frank Fields perfumes himself with hair 

oil.— -That Ed. Heacocks shoots in the Rifle Club every Sunday. That 
he wouldn't have his parents know it for anything. That he cannot 
marry until he is twenty-five years obi. —That Skirm is a landlord, 
altho* his hair is said to be inhabited.— That MaKinney ever spelt his 
name with a Me. That he goes to church to get religion. —That Conant 

is dead, or ever will be. That Frank P. paints his cheeks.— That 

Geo. Hoadlev smokes opium. That Brownstone is satisfied now that he 

has a n>w room mate. That Bradley looks well when he sings. —-That 

Henry Chace ever wore tight pants. That he is always humming that 

sacred air, " Kiss me, Erastns." That J. R. Bailey is a " grass wid- 

i( i. That he is growing corpulenton the sudden change.— —That Char- 
ley Bennett's laziness is attributed to his infernal inactivity.— That 
Royal Heath paved the sand road— no money in it.— That Dr. Carrey 
ever takes any of bis own medicine. That the town would suffer an irre- 
parable loss if he did.— That Myerstein is looking for Allby.— That 
there is a doubt which knows the most. " Bob " or his dog. That "Bob " 
gets the benefit of the doubt.—— That Frank Fields ever visited Los An- 
yeleg.— That Billy Copes wears paper collars, now that his washing 
goes bo the laundry.— That C. H. and R. T. Heath include everything 
but chimney sweeping in their business. 

Santa Clara Lies.— It is not true that James J. Hyde ever 'divulges 
a secret.— That -T. K. Goldbach will always accept legal tenders at par ; 
that his profit* justify the concession.— That S. H. Langford ever al- 
ludes to the beauties of the Alameda ; that lie regrets it leads to San 
J u3 e.«— That J. H. Dibble ever laughs except when ash-ep.— That H. 
Wanderer often rambles so far on Sunday afternoons that his friends give 
him up for lost ; that he has practical reasons for his poetical excursions. 
— That C. V7. Upton likes to hear the echo of his own praises.— That 
M. S. Wilson's motto is "Variety, my friends."— That E. X. Thorn 
pierces man}- a hand.— That L. Lion is the Jenkins of Santa ( 'lara.— 
That Sam Morrison is a persevering advocate of cheap gas.— That 
the i lameron House is a favorite gathering place for readers of the N't WS 
Letter.— That T. Schmittspan has accepted the advice of his friends, 
and will change bis name.— That J. C. Jenkins is a public benefactor. 
—That J. H. Dirregan always keeps on hand a surplus of " cutting 
irony.— That I). Squier is by nature an esquire ; that the parson 
made a mistake at his baptism.— That Santa Clara has fifty parsons and 
forty-four other tradesmen ; that this fact is a matter of general boasting. 

Gilroy Lies. — It is not true that H. Bowkhart ever advocates any 
other interest save tobacco ; that he has one potent reason for his limited 
sympathies.— That T. S. Oldham has designed an original Front Eleva- 
tion.— -That J. C. Gamble can ever be induced to play pedro.— =— That 
E. 1 J . Rogers is always polite to strangers ;, that he often entertains angels, 
and gets unawares.— ■ — That the Briggs family rule Gilroy with a high 
hand.— -That D. C. Riddett is ever puzzled to account for the source of 
his numerous presents. - ■ ■■ - That J. Paine is going to float a railroad to 
run to Hot Springs.— That C. P. Parson is slow of speech, but thinks 
quicker than lightning.-^— That J. B. Rhineharc is the most flowery man 
in Gilroy.— That Baxter wishes he had a more famrliar name ; that his 
partner is troubled with the opposite difficulty.— That Gray is reputed 
to drink like a fish.— That J. B. Johnson is preparing- photographs of 
Gilroy's lug cigar for the Centennial.— =-That H. B. Nance is an excellent 
low comedian.— That Mondragon is wasting his sweetness like other 
roses that bloom in a desert.^— That A. C. Webb lives in a hazy at- 
mosphere.— —That J. C. Jack will be the chief corner stone uf Gilroy's 
brilliant future. 

San Juan Lies.— It is not true that George Pullen was delighted to 
see our " Liar."— ^That Adolphe Vache will be San Juan's "Patron 
Saint" in the great hereafter. That S. Harris always speaks French 

to Spaniards and Mexicans, and Spanish to Frenchmen. That he atones 
for the accidental slight by asking the offended ones to "join him in a 
smile."— That John Anderson ever displays his vocal powers by singing 
" Auld Lang Syne."— That S. \Y. Smith is an artistic landscape gar- 
dener.— That Peter Carlos is most extravagant in the use of cosmetics. 
-^— Thsit G-erbet is always victor in wine competitions.— That Maurice 
Sullivan compares the San Juan valley with the green slopes of Con- 
naught.— -That John Nagle belongs to the "Dutch school.— That 
James Stanley grows eloquent in repeating the legends of '•Old San 
Juan." ■■■That J. R. Hodgson can quote an " old saw " in reply to every 
questi-m.—— That W. E. Lovett likes land suits.-— That Bartholomew 
Samit is a most radical railroad advocate.— That M. Floincheau heads 
his cash book with the word " Ichabod."— =— That the Plaza is still the 
rendezvous for the young, thoughtless and gay.— =— That prayers are 
offered up daily for Flint & Bixby. — —That A.-Westfall thinks the loca- 
tion of San Juan " altogether too healthy." 

Hoi, lister Lies.— It is not true tfiat Roundo always shows his teeth 
when he hwghs.^— That J. Goldfish is the most polite man in Hol- 
lister.^— That he will remember his gentlemanly treatment of our Liar 
the other day.— -That Wentworth is jolly enough to be a judge.— That 
Henry Vascoe can drive to San Juan with his eyes shut.— That Ra- 
mon Gonzales has a secret for distilling nectar.— —That Farrish and 
Chappell are the humorists of Hollister.— — That the " Hollister Hotel" 
has unequaled accommodation for travelers. —That James Hodges 
would keep a horse in his stablsij that could not do a mile in less than 
" two-forty."*— That Tom McMahonis the "Grand Duke of San Benito 
county."— —That J. J. Bowen would make an efficient Secretary of the 
Treasury.— That J. M. Brown is always robed in white.— "That 
Synder is a hard man in driving a bargain.— —That McConnell wears 
well.— That William Pajmtag has a weakness for advertising.— -That 
Houghton's voice is not as strong as it was three months ago. ■ —That 
McPheeters is always shackled by Murphy, but can afford to-carrythe 
burden.— That Luis Argues sighs for the luxuries of the Santa Clara 
valley.— That Robert Rankin's pills ever eases an uncomfortable pil- 



implacable 



low.— That Hollister can afford to laugh at San Ji 
enmity. 

Santa Barbara Lies.— It is not true that Winchester bought that sad- 
dle of Main & Winchester* on the strength of Ids relationship.— That 
Charlie Dearie ever " back-capped" anybody. ■ ■ " That Barkness runs that 
store on his sifter's brother's wife's coin ; that if she busts he will.— That 
Pied, Bray has received a position as yet ; that that is what he went to 
Santa Barbara for.— That Share sings in church for pay.— That Doc. 
W. will ever see forty-five again ; that he dyes his hair to appear young 
before innocent young ladies.— That Col. H. controls the minds of the 
people of that little " burgh.' —That Goodall Nelson ever made a cent 
exporting' from Santa Barbara.— That the Morris House is inhabited. 
— That the Occidental is overflowing with consumptive boarders.^— 
That the " ( Md Fellows' " balls are " tony" affairs.— =>That Fred. Pray 
is behaving himself to get a position on the one-horse railroad. 

STATEMENT 

OF THE CONDITION AND AFFAIRS OF THE 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of San Francisco, 

In the State of California, on the 31st day of December. A.D. 
1876, and for the year ending on that day, ;ls made to the Insurance Oommis-. 
Bionerof the State of California, pursuant to the provisions of Sections 610 and till 
of the Political Code, condensed as per blank furnished by the Commissioner. 
Capital, 0300,000. 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in Cash , S'200,000 CO 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in stockholders' approved stock notes, 

authorized by Section *1G, Political Code 100,000 00 

Assets. 

Real Estate owned by Company £ 17,000 

Loans on bond and Mortgage., 59,718 90 

(.'ash market value of ;il) stocks and Bonds owned bv Company 53,100 00 

Amount of Lnaite secured by pledge of Bonds, Stocks and other market- 
able securities as collaterals 21.040 00 

Cash in Company's offices at San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose 2,548 42 

Cash in fifteen Banks and Savings Banks in Cal'u, Oregon and Colorado. . . 121,093 92 

Interest due and accrued on all Stocfts and Loans 2,805 11 

Interest due and accrued on Bonds and Mortgages 4,203 !'l 

Premiums in due course of colleuticn 20,022 78 

Premiums in due course of collection in hands of Agents 22,031 23 

Assessment levied December 17. 1875, remaining unpaid 28,040 00 

Casks and wine in warehouse owned by the Company 13,031 26 

Office Furniture, Safes, Horses, Buggies, Harnesses, in San Francisco, San 

Jose, Stockton, Oakland, Virginia City, Nevada, and Portland, Oregon. 10,383 05 

Oregon State Stamps on hand 136 7" 

Short term and call loans, on indorsed notes and other gocd securities 30,893 46 

Stockholders' approved notes, authorized by Section 014" of Political Code. 100,000 00 



Total Assets .gSll,fift3 7-1 

Liabilities. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid, Fire, in California 91,825 00 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense, Fire, in Oregon and Utah. . 2,750 ll(l 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense, Marine, 1S73 " 2,800 00 

Total Fire and Marine unpaid 7,375 00 

Gross premiums on Fir* Risks running one year or less, $807,965 OS, re- 
insurance fifty per cent 158,982 84 

Gross premiums on Fire Risks running more than one year, 936,108 0s. re- 
insurance pro rata 22,231 10 

Dividends to .Stockholders not called for 1,106 00 



Total Liabilities 184,694 94 

Income. 

Net Cash actually received for Fire Premiums 9367,285 70 

Net Cash actually received for Marine Premiums 5,003 s2 

Discontinued Marine business, January 20, ls7?>. 
Received for interest on Bonds and Mortgages, Stocks, Loans and from all 

other sources 27,226 4 ■ 

Interest accrued on same 5,304 70 

Assessment on capital stock, levied December 17, 1S7"> 60,0( 

Increase in value of United States Bonds .*. 1,084 53 

Total Income 9465.905 29 



Expenditures. 

Net amount paid for Fire Losses (including $'9,324 11 losses of previous 

years) $203,480 36 

Net amount paid for Marine Losses (including $63,194 41 losses on previous 

years) 08,208 14 

Dividends to Stockholders S0.& I 

Paid <ir allowed f<»r Commissions or Brokerage 67,869 62 

Paid for Salaries, Fees, and all other charges for Officers, Clerks, etc 38,144 22 

Paid fur all other office expense 36,642 40 

Paid for State, National and Local Taxes 993 85 

Reinsurance and Cancellations of Marine Risks upon retiring from that 

branch of the insurance business 0,1 00 72 

Sundry small items to Profit and Loss 692 92 

.Total Expenditures .sf.2n.i22 2:i 



Losses. 

FIRE. MARINE. 

Incurred during the year $203,731 25 $5,103 73 



Risks anil Premiums. 

FIRE RISKS. 

Net amount of risks written during the year 925,721,855 

Net amount of risks expired during the year 20,511,114 

Net amount in force December 81, 1875 22,708,153 

Risks written in the State of California 23,023.344 



Net amount of risks written during the year. . 
Net amount "f risks expired during the year . 
Risks written in the State of California 



Ciias. R. Story, Secretary. 



PREMIUMS. 
3378,619 2:. 
324,076 12 
344,073 70 
370,384 U 



N All INK RISKS. PREMIUMS, 

§316,229 % 5,169 20 

301,825 28,076 55 

308,354 4,525 80 

J. F. HOUGHTON, President. 
Jan. 29. 



15,000 TON'S PER MONTH 

Of Black Diamond ami other Sft. Diablo Coals received and 
for sale by [May 28.] P. B. CORNWALL, Pres't 15. 1>. Coal Mining Co. 



Jim. 



CALIFORNIA ADVKKTISEK. 



18 



NEWS LLTTIiRS MEDICAL BILL --Coiw luded. 

d thirty 
i wiurtl a tnw 

! ioi » "mt. iimi 

Pi it. 



OUR CHINA CORRESPONDENT. 

! I 

Deal Nowa Letter —I'., taking u: 

in refereDi ■ to affairs in Hii-- court- 

• I tli.- death ..I \lnii-Vi 

nt Pnli . to be the mosl in ■ 

iry of Legation, Dr. Williams, i- ;tl-" the in 
■ tim.', with nobody t.> helii him, and bail 
Home nine times, was unxortuni ■ 
• lit from Pekin. 

tfa of 1 . S. MinisttT &very a curious - 
l place, 1 »i . Wil . iIm' Lit.- Minister Werj 

young limn, an American missionary, who knew nothing ab 

national affairs, who has now assumed tl I Charge 

i I has written t<- the Foreign Plenipotentiaries to that offect. 

officials at Pekin wonder if the UniU'd States i> really :i 

iti.in. many having their doubts. All the large powers have at- 

itaff, nearly all having a chaplain and 

■ I the State Depart 

I . s. t ionsul Gi ni i ■ ■' 

i '.-Lin aa < !hargv d'Affairea. 

irlj every one w ishing 
they were out "f t "at hay. What a change In*- come over China since my 
Canton nearly thirty years aso, when the Song Bystem was in it's 
glory, and the mercb to l west transa :ted their dig- 

nified bargains at the Canton factories. There \* something fascinating 
conning overt China trade was nearly in its infancy with the 

Anglo ~ c irtainly halcyon days^ those days of the 

old Hong merchants, when commerce had more prestige and prosperity 
it than in these more pettifogging times. But change is the uni- 
law, and when the ¥ s compelled its revolution I 

- palmy days in Btore for the good merchants of China as 
there were in the good old days of Canton. 

\ t port has been rife to the effect that the young Emperor of China, 

nig under the name of Cuangsu, is dead. The embassy to England 

murder of Mr. Margary will leave next Spring. 

Either Dr. McCartney, late of the 99th Regiment, and afterwards the 

founder of the Nankin Arsenal, or Mr. Brown, of the British Embassy at 

is expected to accompany them. 

Near Ningj t made a raid on two oxen, upon which they made 

:i bastv meal the other day. The villagers, who were utterly defensoless, 

turned out in great force armed with targe gongs, with which they made 

inding riot that the tigers were terrified out of their wits, and 

immediate tracks for home. For general news, I refer you to your 

Blea ' * * L. 

[COMSrUNICATED.] 

REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATIONS. 

Editor News Letter :— I am an honest mechanic, reader of your 

i i '. Many months Bince I purchased from the Real Es- 

iciatee a home for my little family, paying a certain small per- 

e of the purchase money down as a margin. (You know what a 

i is : it i- the blank around the printing on a certificate of mining 

And I gave seventy-two notes of equal amount for the balance, 

and so Far 1 have had no trouble in meeting my note each month. I pre- 

.ii knew how the notes are figured out? Well, they add to the 

unpaid balance '.' per cent, per year for six years, or seventy-two months, 

and then 9 per cent, for half or the time on the seventy-two months' in- 

which they call averaging the interest. As I read McCoppin's 

City Hall bill, I thought, " that beats the Real Estate Associate lay j" 

at. per annum for thirty years, annual payments after ten years is 

slightly ahead of 9 per cent, per annum fur six years, payable monthly 

from the start. If the Real Estate Associates could only borrow money 

nil bonds as the city of Sun Francisco can, they would put up all the 

private and public buildings in the place. But I've since read the News 

L> " r articles on the subject, which accorded with my own original views, 

and the newspaper arguments of those who own property on Telegraph 

Hill, North Beach, Russian Hill and Washerwoman's Bay (where the 

new City Hall should have been located) ,and of those who own whisky 

mills near the present City Hall, and I'm a convert to" the "pay as you 

go " plan. I now see how much better it would have been for me to have 

kept on paying rent, and if I had anything over pay it on account of my 

lot, and when that should be paid for build so much of my house each 

month as I could pay for, and then I would not have these notes hanging 

over me. In forty-seven years and three and a half months I'd been ready 

t.i commence my front fence. Mechanic. 



t The bi-rnonthly entertainment of the Social and Literary Society of 
St. John's Presbyterian Church, of which Mr. Newhall is the President, 
was held on Wednesday evening last, and, in despite of the rain,. a large 
and fashionable audience was in attendance. The programme embraced 
the names of some dozen or more ladies and gentlemen. Mrs. Thompson 
and Professor Wheeler sang a duet with most pleasing effect, and Miss A. 
Butterfield's recitation was particularly happy. The crowning piece of 
the evening was the singing by Miss Marian .Singer. Her voice is power- 
ful an 1 of unusual compass, and received the plaudits of all. The piano 
Bolo of Miss Davis was very artistically performed, and reflected much 
credit upon her calling- forth an encore, as did the comic songs ofjW. J. 
Callingham. The Voluntary upon the Grand Organ added much to the 
enjoyment of the evening. 



"Bose," a mongrel yellow dog, is the mail carrier between Minnesota 
and Dakota, sixty miles. He makes the trip for nothing and boards him- 
self, and never fails. There seems to be no competitors for the position. 



W\DE'S flPLRA } 0' 

Muwlou Mn-ri. ii<>ur«'ii Thirl mni Fourth.— F, W. 

■ 

i ■ . ■ . ■ , 

: i 

I 



It. rl. 

MI I. 






IRE'S OPERA H0U8E. 

Bomh street, bet. Sfoutffomerj and Koarnj .---t. Has aire, 
riii* i ■ ' ■ i i,, « 

I \l II <u:\l \ MINsTKI I ■> (li 
n, III] i \ coi 
FLfcWY FLKWY. La ] WIIM , Mlt 

f TH i I tSIAI PART 1 lllfel '■ 

. . ,. 
■,...! ii ■ |l i! i ■ .-■ : i ] ,, i m , 

H .I:mi '■' 

CALIFORNIA THEATEB. 

BumIi *ii-<m>i. above Kearoj .•••John HeCullonvh, Proprietor 
and Manager ; Barton ihii, Ictlng Manager, u 

■I i mm \ WALI ■ ii impenonatio AEG 

MKKR1LIES. On '■ la; owning next will be prod i v\ , i , t. < ' tragedy ol THE 

M CHESS OF MALF1 ' Duo notice will h ■ n ol ill H dli i ip n u 

i. \n\ M tCBETH. NOTICE Owln ■ In otl tli , 

mationa are nocoasarilj limited to thi numboi ol repri entatlon ■ 
character as announced. I lit ■_■ .... b< ordered foi 

WA.0EM OPE^v HITMF, 

Misxinai street, near Thtrd.—Freilerlck w, itcrt. Leasee nmi 
Manager. Second Wool, and Closing Nighta ol SNOWFLAKK ! In conso- 

quon her engagements' the mo niiflcenl spectacle of SNOWFLAKE will shortly 

be withdrawn. ThisSatunuu W1 irnoon, Jan. 20th, SNOWFLAKE Matinee! R un - 
day r.vcn'nur, January :UK\\. the l-'ah *ri opera Tnninj in the H[u-ra "f KUMANI ! 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washington and Jaeksou.— Samuel 
Tetlow, Proprietor; W. C. Crosbie, Stage Manager; E. Zimmer, Musical Dl- 
roetor. Monday, January 31st. LIMA EDWIN and BLAND HOLT, Specialti and 
Borlosque Artists. PAi i. MART1NETTI, ALFRED MARTINETTI, and JOSEPHINE 
MICHELY, the Ri aownod Pantomimists. MISS KITTY HENDERSON and 01 ORGE 
F MOORE, theGroat Dutch Comiques. COGILL and COOPER, Celebrated Song 
and Dance Artists. Jan. 29. 

SAMU'L McKEE & CO., 

Stock Brokers an<l dealers in sihk Prlvlleses v 334 Mont- 
gomery Btreet, San Franciuco, We transact a general Stock Brokerage BuBiness 
i;u> and Sell Stocks for cash or on a margin, making cash advances onactiveaccounts. 
We make a Bpecialtj "i Stock Privileges. Our buainesa bos assumed such proportions 
that we arc compelled t" remove From our late office t" tin.' largo office, No, 324 Mont- 

■- iry street (Safe Deposit Company's Building). Our Brokers are DR. C. W. P iX 

and ('MAS. X. NEAL, Membere ol the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board. 
Bankers : Tin 1 Nevada Bank of San Fraocisoo. Our Weekly Ciroular, containing the 

lii- ; i :■•! nmi l.iuv-t pru-i.s of a«'t.ivv St.u']<s fur each day for the past thirty days, with 

a Pamphlet explaining Stock Privileges, Bent free to any address No. 824 Moutgom- 

ery street, S. F. Olticu at V irifinia City, in Wells, Kur^u A: (.'n.'s hnililin- .Jan. -'■'. 

DELTNQTJENT POLL TAXE3. 

OHiee or the Tax Collector oi'lhr City and County of Snn 
Francisco, January 22, 187C. Public notice is hereby given to all persons 
who have failed or neglected to pay the POLL TAX due fur the fiscal year 1875 76, 
that the same has bee e DELINQUENT, and been placed in my hands lor collec- 
tion, and if not paid on or before the FIRST MONDAY OP MARCH, will become a 
lien upon their property, and be collected as provided in Section 8,860 of the Political 
Code. [Jan. 20, WM. FORD Tax Co lector. 

DIVIDEND N0TTCE. 

Masonie Savings ami B.onn Bank. Ko. (■ Post street, .Hasonie 
Temple, San Srancisco. —At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this Bank 
held January 18th, 1876, a dividend was declared at the rate of nine (9) per cent pi r 
annum on Term Deposits, and seven and one-half (7J) per cent, per annum on Ordi- 
nary Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending January 21, 1671), payable on and af- 
ter January 22, 1876j free of Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 2f». H. T. CRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND N07TCE 

The Ilibernia Savings anil Loan Society, San Francisco, 
January 25, 1876.— At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Hi- 
beriiia Savings and Loan Society, held this day, a dividend at the rate of eight per 
C&nt. per annum was declared for the half year ending January 21, iy"(i, free from 
Federal Tax, and payable from and after this date. 
Jan. 2S>. EDWARD MARTIN Secretary. 

REMOVAL. 

J anios *». Steele A* Co.. Chemists anil Apothecaries, will re- 
move from their old stand to their new and commodious Btore, No. 816 Kearny 

street, east side, between Fine and Bush, by the 1st of February next. Thankful for 
the patronage that bus been given them in the past, they respectfully ask a contin- 
uance Of the same, and, by their usual attention and carefulness, will endeavor to 
merit that i.ierease of business which their more favorable location invites. 
Jan. 2D. JAMES G. STEELE & CO. 

ENGLISH AND FRENCH TUITION. 

Mr. A. I*. IMetz. I>oetor of Philosophy, from theFiiiversity 
of Franco, and Licentiate Teacher from the Public Schools of this city, offers 
his services as an experienced and a successful instructor in the French language, to- 
gether with all the English branches. For particulars apply at 946 Eolsom street, 
San Francisco. Jan. 2i). 

B. F. Flint. Flint, Bixlv & Co.] [J. Lee. D. W. Foloer. 

A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Grartcrs, Packers anil Dealers in WOOl, corner Of Battery 
ami Greenwich streets, San Francisco. _ Jan. 2D. 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURV'CE r0' T PANY. 

Losses Pail.--- $2,820,000 — A sterling California CO., with 
a national reputation for promptness and fair dealing, gained during thirteen 
years of service. Assets— $753,467 57. 

D. J. STAPLES, President; ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President 
Geo. D. Dorin, Sec. ; W. J. DuTTOS, Ass't Sec. Jan. 29. 

NOTRE. 

Mrs. Robertson, or llnrsheail, will please communicate im- 
mediately with her daughter Jennie, or her guardian. [Santo Barbara aim 
Los Angeles papers please copy.] Jan. 2'X 

MR*. CORL'STT, 

Teacher Of English an:l fftalian Sf ng-iiig. the PianO FOrtc, 
and Elocution, 331 Kearny street. Room 1*. Jan. 29. 



H 



SAN' FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[.Tnn.^9, 1876. 



COLUMN FOR THE CURIOUS, 

In Nature, Science, and Art. 



Cruelty to Birds — Several cases of cruelty to trapped game and small 
birds having recently come under the notice of an English Farmers' Club, 
the secretary received the following letter from Baroness Burdett-Coutts : 
"Sir— Please convey to the members of your excellent society the sense of 
pleasure it gave me to learn that there was an unanimous desire on their 
part to put down the cruelty, which has been extensively practiced in this 
antl other districts, in wantonly killing- and (as I learn from the Christ- 
church papers of the 10th instant) actually torturing small birds. That 
three men should be charged with plucking the wings and feathers of these 
most harmless of God's creatures while still alive would seem incredible at 
the present day ; but as it appears the destination of these feathers is for 
the adornment of ladies' attire, it is nearly time the sense of English wo- 
men were quickened to the enormity of the crime. I have already com- 
municated with many of the leaders of fashion in this country on the sub- 
ject, and in a sympathetic letter which I had from Madame Louise, I re- 
gret bo learn that repugnant as is the present fashion, there is still a grow- 
ing demand for it. English ladies will therefore incur a serious responsi- 
bility- and an unenviable reputation for heartlessness unless they discard a 
practice which is attended with so much torture to its innocent victims as 
this is now shown to be.— E. BOBDEPT-ConTTS." 

A -writer in All the Year Round says of a well-known architect : 
One of the freaks of Sir John Sloane, considered by most men of artistic 
taste to be puerile, is a sort of imitative monastery en petit Wishing to 
produce, with a small space, the various contrasting effects of ecclesia-tical 
architecture, he imagined the life of a monk, and provided him with a 
monastic cell, oratory, and grave. He imagined the monk, " Padre Gio- 
vanni," to be refined rather than ascetic ; he built for him a parlor lighted 
with a window of stained glass, through which can be seen the rules of a 
monastery, together with the padre's cell, oratory, and grave. In the cell 
is a niche for holy water ; in the oratory is a highly wrought carved cruci- 
fix, and there are also missals, relics, stained glass pictures of sacred sub- 
jects and models of ecclesiastical buildings. The tomb of the supposed 
monk is made with the fragments of an old monument once placed over a 
family vault in an Essex churchyard. In short, to use Sir John's own de- 
scription, throughout the realization of this mediaeval conception, " atten- 
tion has been given to every minute circumstance." The oddity of the 
conception becomes all the more manfest when we associate it with the lo- 
cality, a back room or two in a dwelling-house in Lincoln'sinn-fields. 

Alcohol in Beer. — Most people have been under the notion, says Iron, 
that a very infinitesimal modicum of the teetotaller's belt aoir lurked in 
the liquor dispensed by publicans at 3d. a quart "in your own mugs," and 
they must have been proportionately astounded by the statement in the 
last number of the San itary Record, that two quarts of London particular, 
retailed at 4d. over the counter, contain, on the average, more alcohol than 
is contained in half a pint of brandy or whioky. But Mr. Dugald Camp- 
bell, chemist to the County Brewers' Society, probably a Highlandman to 
boot, and who must consequently be well posted up both in beer and 
whisky, declares that ales and porter sold to publicans seldom contain 
more than 7 per cent, of proof spirits. Mr. Campbell adds that " if " the 
publicans add treacle and water to the beer they receive from the brewer, 
the percentage would be still less. His estimate is evidently very much 
nearer the truth than the other ; it is difficult to understand how the Sa n- 
itarii Record's analyst could furnish such a report, unless he had tested the 
beer in his own alembic, and made a mistake in the measure. 

The poisonous snakes destroyed in the Punjab between the months 
of April and August last amount to the surprising number of 19,84S, for 
which at the rate of two annas a head have been paid by the Lncal Gov- 
ernment. Five hundred non-venomous snakes, for whose destruction no 
reward was paid, were also brought in to the police ; altogether 20,000 
snakes destroyed in four months is not so bad. Of these, over 19,000 were 
either Banganw, Carubus (Karait), or varieties of the same species, and 
only 30 specimens of the Echis corniata. Colored* clay models of these 
two species have been supplied to the police, as well as drawings of the 
jaws and teeth, by which specimens brought in can be more surely identi- 
fied. An instance has occurred of one man receiving a hundred rupees 
for the snakes brought in by him to an assistant district superintendent of 
police in one month. 

Good News for the Antiquarians. — A book has been discovered which 
will throw light on the birth of chemistry in Egypt, and perhaps throw 
the labors of Paracelsus far into the shade. It is called "Papyrus Ebers, 
the Hermetic Book of the Medicines of the Ancient Egyptian." It is 
said to throw great light on the manners and customs of Egypt, to be full 
of erudite learning, and to contain come facts which even modern chemists 
will be none the worse for knowing. 

The Original of a Famous Air. — A Paris correspondent says : "While 
writing on musical subjects I may mention that a Parisian bookworm has 
discovered — or affirms that he has discovered — the original copy of thean- 
them by Lully, which was song as a canticle by the schoolgirls of St. Cyr 
under Louis XIV., and which — the French say — a composer appropriated 
and turned into " God Save the King." 

Administration of Food by Hypodermic Injection.— One of the 
latest practical discoveries of science is -the administration of food by 
hypodermic injection. "We all know that it has been the custom for many 
years to administer morphia by making a small puncture in the skiu and 
injecting a solution of morphia with a syringe, and that sleep follows al- 
most immediately. 

The Academy says : Wells College, at Aurora, Illinois, has been pre- 
sented with two pieces of sculpture claiming to be the work of Canova. 
One is a marble bust of Napoleon I., and the other is a bust of Marie 
Louise. 

Earthquake shocks have recently been felt in India at Lahore and 
the Peshawar District, where several lives were lost. A shock was also 
felt at Bildah, Province of Algiers. 

Captain Burton, who recently visited the land of the Pans, says they 
roast and eat portions of their enemies slain in battle as a quasi-religious 
rite. 

Volcanic eruptions continue in Iceland, and Vesuvius is in an uneasy 
state. Mount Tougararo. New Zealand, is in a high state of activity. 



[ADVERTISEMENT.] 

A ROGUE'S RETROSPECT. 

[From the New Tori? Tribune, June 6, 1?19.] 
" Loring Pickering,* late editor oi'rhe St. Louis Union, absconded recently, 
"leaving, it \? paid, many of his friends in the lurch for large amounts. On the 
" 25tb iiM. a warrant was issued for his arrest on n charge of forgery, preferred by 
" Samuel Treat, Esq. Officers were imm< dtately Bent up the Missouri in pursuit of 
" him, as it was stfiposed he had started for California.— Philadelphia Bulllli^:.' , 

[From the New York Tribune. .Tnr*> IP 8-1' 
" Arrest of Pickering 1 , late Editor of the Sv. Louis Union. — Stiose- 
quent accounts do not entirely conl i 'ir tL» report* hitherto received. It is now 
"stated, by those who ought to know, tnnt Pickering was arreted in St Joseph 
'* by Messrs. Treat A Knimrun, and subsequently committed tu the custody of the 
" Sheriff, or one of his deputies, of Buchanan County. While in enstodv he found 
"means to escape, \nd made off to parts unknown. *The partv in pursuit of him, 
" it is said, only s ccccded in obtaining $700 from him, and no other properly or 
"Dotes. Those it pursuit, we are told, were not prepared with any authority to 
" follow him bey nd the limits of the State.— St. iswis Republican, 107A." 

[From the Xew Tork Tribune. June ^0, 1S10.1 
* * The Absquatulator. — Information was received from St. Joseph yester- 
" day that Messrs. Knimrun ifc Treat came up with Pickering at that place; that 
"they compounded \* ith him for his offenses by receiving some s7.~>u in money and 
"about $4,00U in notes of hand, etc., and then let him go. When the boat lift he 
"was fitting out for California, and they were returning by easy stages to St. 
" Louis.— St. Louis Republican, SWA." 

[ *The above named Luring Pickering is now one of the Proprietors of the San 
Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin and Morning Call, two papers published in 
this c'ty ] 

LE4. & PERRIN'S CELEBRATED WORSEiTESSHiRE SAUCE, 

Declared by Connoisseurs to be the Only Gooti Sauce. .--In 
consequence of spurious imitations of LEA «& PEKRINS' SAl'CL, which are 
calculated to deceive the public, Lea *fc Perrins have adopted A SBW larkl bearing 
their signature, LEA & PLKRINS, which will be placed on every buttle of W1 K> ES- 
TL'RSHlKh SAUCE, after this date, and without which none isgcimine. November, 
1*74. ' This does not apply to shipments made- prior to the date given. 

A*k fnr Lea & Perrins? Saute, and see name mi wrapper, label, bottle and stopper. 
Wholesale and for export by the proprietors. Worcester ; Crosse & Black well, Lon- 
don, etc., etc., and bv grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 

Augusts. MESSRS. (.'ROSS a (.'»>., San FniJici-...-. 

KEATING'S CODGH LOZENGES. 

Upwards of fifty years experience has f nlly confirmed the 
superior reputation of these Lozenges in the Cure of Asthma, Winter Cough, 

Hoarseness, Shortness of lireath, and other Pulmonary Maladies. Sold in bottles of 
parlous Sizes. KEATING'S li W-BONS, or CHILDREN'S WORM TABLETS, a purely 
vegetable sweetmeat, furnishing both in appearance and taste a most agreeable 
method of administering a well-known remedy for Intestinal or Thread Worms. It 
is a perfectly safe and mild preparation, and e sp ecially adapted for Children. Sold >** 
bottles of -various sizes. THOS. KEATING, London, 

Exiiort Chemist and Druggist. 

Indents for Pure Drugs and Chemicals carefully executed. 

Agents— Cn A kles Lasoley & Co., corner Battery and Clay sts., S. F. June 29. 

MARAVILLA COCOA. 

Taylor Rrollicrs (die largest BftMfcuuieiureii* of Co eon ft* Furore). 
having the Exclusive Supply of this unrivaled Cocoa. Invite comparison with 
any other Cocoa for puritv, fine aroma, sanative, nntrative and sustaining power, 
easiness of digestion, and especially High Delicious Flavor. One trial will estab- 
lish it as a favorite beverage tor breakfast, lunch eon, and a soothing refreshment 
after a late, evening. N. B. Caution— "MAKAVILLA" is a registered Trade Mark. 

MARAVILLA CCCOA. 

Tbe Globe sars. "Tailor Krolliei V JMtaraoi Mln Coeon hr* :•* 'Iiieved n 
thorough success, and supersedes every other Cocoa in the market. Entire 
soluhilily, :t delicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest elements ol nu- 
trition, distinguish the Maravilla Cocoa above all others. For invalids and dyspep- 
tics, we could not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage." For further 
favorable opinions vide Standard, Morning Post, British Medical Journal, etc., etc. 

HOMEOPATHIC COCOA. 

Thin original prepnrntim- Ii;s »ttat£i*rri ;i w«trld-ivi«?e reputation, 
and is manufactured bv TAYLOR BROTHERS, under the ablest Honumpathic 
advice, aided bv the skill and experience of Hie inventors, and will be found to com- 
bine in an eminent degree the purity, flue aroma, and nutritious property of the 
fresh nut. 

SOLUBLE CHCC01ATE. 

Made In one minute witliont !m;eIj< c. — 'lite :tbovc nr(fcles nre pre- 
pared exclusively by TAYLOR BROTHERS, the largeet manufacturers in 

Europe, and sold in tin-lined packets only, bv storekeepers and others all over the 
world. STEAM MILLS, BRICK LANE, LONDON. Export Chicory Mills. Bruges, 
Belgium. May 10. 

JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION.— ESTABLISHED 1820. 

Tiio attention of Sportsmen is inviteit to the following: Am- 
munition, of the best quality, now in general use throughout England, India 
and the Colonies: Joyce's Treble Waterproof Central Fire Percussion Caps; Chemically- 
prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wadding ; Joyce's Gas-light I lartridges, for Tin-fire and 
Central-fire Breech -loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for killing game at long distinct-. 
and every description of Sporting Ammunition. Sold bv all ganmakers and dealers in 
gunpowder. .FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., Patentees and Manufacturers, 

Aug. 29. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 

ROWLANDS' MACASSAR OIL 

Preserves, strei-c-du's * aid iM-itulitcc* (lie lti>m:m lmfr : molten it 
grow thickly on bald places, and eradicates BCQri and dandruff; has been In 
use all over tlie world for the lust seven tv-tlvc years. ROWLANDS' E BSENCR OF 

hro" 
i!er 
ild Imitations. 



BEST FO >D FOR INFANTS,. 

Supplying: the highest amount of nourishment in the most 
digestible and convenient form. SAVORY & MOORE, 143 New Bond street, 
London, and all Chemists and Storekeepers throughout the World. June 19. 

CAUTION— BETTS'S PATENT CAPSULES. 

The public are renpectftilly es ntioi e<I tic I B-l(.«."s iviei'l C::p»"u1e» 
are being infringed. BETTS'S name Is upon every Capsule he mnkesiOr tbe 

leading Merchants at home and abroad, and he is the Only Inventor and Sole Maker 
In the united Kingdom. Majtufaotokis: 1,Whabf Road, City Road. Lokdos , 
axp Bqrpkaux, Francs. June 15. 

J. H. CUTTER OLD BOURBON. 
/^ P. Moorman A' Co., Manufacturers, Louisville, My.— 

\jm The above well-known House is represented here by the undersigned, who 
have been appointed their Sole Agents (or the Pacific Coast. 
July :i. A. P. HOTALING & CO. , 420 and 431 Jackson street, S. F. 

QUICKSILVER. 
or sale — In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 Sausome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 16. 



F 



0A1 [KORNIA \i>\ l.i; I l- 



Lfi 



SPECIAL BREVITIES. 

Aii Anecdote of W.iahiiiKton — < indue familiarity, the 

uffioieul 
ii\ ->i hUtoi \ . w lilch i* In 
■ 

in Rrmii Mi- itafc ly 
■ ii imt 
riilicutetl thu l*i ■ utli ul ■ ' »w« ill 
i that he would Dot hesitate to clap the 

-a on ili ■ buck, an l. tm ler tii banter ol bis companions, carried 
The l""k J indignation which Wai 

upon liiin wai an everlaatlng leeeon t-> him on the subject of 
Mty. 
Dramatic Authors Profits iu France.- -Next (.• I. in 

rofitable pursuit <-i the tight business kind Lb t.> be the nuthor ol a 
i of the theater where it i-* played M. 
■ 

u the Porte St. Martin bill, has been played f"i Ufl 
..'.\i->. Sundays included, and has produced in round numbei 
i*h> 01 that amount the author has s right to £8,000. or 10 pel 
in addition to about L> •■ h night, say £3,200, which 

■ ' It La true that M. Jul* a \ erne 
that "Uiii with lii- collaborator, M. d'Ennery, but still liis 
profits .tr ■ r. spect hble. As the Paris poor are entitled to four per cent, of 
till theatrical receipts, they have received .i total of at least £3,200. 

The Postmaster General, in his last report, estimates that 129,000,- 
OOOposI ded during the nscal year ending, June 30th, 

of the growing popularity «■!" the cards and the demand there will 
!«■ for them for centennial advertising. But the demand thus far exceeds 
itimate, There is Borne talk or getting up a centennial postal card, 
to bear suitable mscription, t.i b. ..■ lelphia as tokens of the ex- 

hibition, a plan which it has been decided to carry out in regard to the 
government Btamped envelopes, A possible aubstitute for or improvement 
npon tl '.. the manufacture of which i.s under consideration in 

i irtment, is a stamped sheet about the size of a half- 
■' note-paper, with a gummed flap at one end, to .serve as both let- 
t and envelope, and to cost two cents. 

The monetary changes taking pla •■• in Germany are now about com- 
plete, and may be thusly summed np : The coinage uf over s.'!i.)0.0oit,u00 
bout 942,000,000] ulver, the withdrawal of S'm.lHiO,- 
000 of the Old coinage, the contraction of the paper currency by the with- 
drawal of the smaller notee to the net amount of $65,000,000, and the sub- 
stitution of 8250,000,000 of paper money expressed in marks for a similar 
amount expressed in thalers. t Considering the magnitude of these changes, 
ve not greatlv i mbarrassed business, most of the financial distress 
of tiie country rising from the over- expansion uf industry after the war. 

Remarkable Chess Playing. — A letter from Florence states that a 
Pole, named Macauski, has just accomplished the teat of playing simul- 
tanously five games of chess, at the Philological Club, without in any case 
seeing the board. He had offered to sustain six contests, Imt five com- 

Iietitors only presented themselves. These were an American lady, an 
talian, an Englishman, a Mexican, and a German. The play lasted from 
half-past one m the day until eight in the evening, and resulted in M. 
\l;i uski winning three games and losing two. The lady was one of the 
successful combatants. — Globe 

Washington society is absorbed by the high rank and scenic display 
of the Russian Minister's establishment. The Minister and his wife go 
about on visits of ceremony accompanied by a chasseur who wears a 
sword and cap with a long drooping white feather. This chasseur sits on the 
box of tiie carriage alongside the coachman, and dismounts when the car- 
riage stops, and with drawn sword uplifted assists her Royal Highness and 
lii- Royal Highness to alight, and conducts them to the house, and then 
stands military fashion until they appear. 

In spite of Lord Derby*s disclaimer of "any wish to establish a pro- 
tectorate of Egypt," the Pall Mall Gazette declares that the country has 
accurately measured the consequences of the important step just taken, 
and that it is idle to conceal that they are much farther reaching than he 
thought it advisable to admit. The political attitude of England toward 
the land of the Pharaohs will be wholly different in the future from what 
it has been in the past. 

One great failure of a speculator on the Stock Exchange, which was 
fully expected, has been averted. His losses were enormous — were, in 
fact, reported to amount to six figures— and the great crash seemed inevit- 
able. But an influential friend gave him a few hours' notice respecting 
the Suez Canal purchase, and, thus enlightened, he bought heavily in 
Egyptians, and pulled himself through. — English Paper. 

The proposed army reduction bill will place the salaries about as 
follows: General of the Army, §17,000; Lieutenant -General, §11,500; 
Major Generals, ©7,600 ; Brigadier Generals, 85,500. The pay of Colonel, 
Lieutenant-Colonel, Major, Captain, and First Lieutenant is left un- 
changed. The pay of Second Lieutenant is reduced to 81,300 for a mounted 
officer and 81,200 for one not mounted. 

Religious Newspapers. — The Bishop of Manchester is severe on the 
newspaper press supposed to represent "the cloth." His lordship, preach- 
ing at Holmfirth, said he regarded those newspapers calling themselves re- 
ligious as simply incendiaries, and if they had any influence he should al- 
most despair of a sober type of Christianity being maintained in the 
country. — English Paper. 

In the Milan cemetery a pavilion has been put up for the cremation 
of bodies, which, being placed on an altar, are subjected to the action of 200 
gas burners, giving a heat of 1,000'. Thus a body i^ consumed to ashes in 
one hour. On January 15th, Chevalier Albert Keller was burnt, the 
preparations having been made by directions of his will. 

The King of Sweden has been in the habit of commuting- the death 
sentences of murderers to imprisonment for life, but the number of mur- 
ders has increased so rapidly that he has given up the practice. 

Panthers destroyed sixteen out of a drove of one hundred and thirty- 
three sheep on the Cowichan trail one night recently. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 



iioitiitr Ki:>Min m ii nx, 

Con suit in if Surgeon and Physician. 

Oottbat I hour, 10A.M dally. 

DR. GE 'RUE C MATTHEWS, 

I lee n Mute Royal Colleare <»' Sam h. Ireland i k.k.c.i*. 
J Uld I M . i . i 
'-'- Utfc 

DOCTOR ANDREI 
ii* ri'inriKMi from Europe), and may be found at biaoflee. 

over iiu i i ,;. Street Saving! bank. 



II 



A CARD. 



J II. Ntallaril. Physician. 91. n., London i Rff.B.f.P., Lon- 
• don; 1LR.CS., England Kmnerlj Ph ti< Ureal Northern Boo- 
U iry, London. 8.E, corner ol Posl ud Koarnj, en- 
Post Office bourn tram IS to 8. lap] qj hour. 
___ [Novcmbei <-.\ 

PHYSICIAN, S1/BGEON AM) AC< Ol ClIEl'R, 

J. J. AUEBBACH. M.D., 
March 13. Stockton street, Ban Francisco. 

NOTICE. 

Dr. A. J. Howie bn» resumed the practice of his profession. 
Office, 622 <'U> street 'Office Hours from 10 a. m. to 3 p.a. Sept -7. 

N. MILLER, M.D.. 

Physician, Onklantt. <»fficc,100l Broadway; Resilience. 36-1 
Eighth street October 8 

DR. J. P. M03KLAE. 
23 Post street Office Hours, 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. Oct. 16. 



DR L. V. EVGL^HARD, 
*>»>•> Kearny street, Consulting Physician and Snrgreon. 

•_>.-**_> S|>ri ruin.- : Kye, Lur, Thront and Skin Diseases. Office Iluur- : LSI to 



L'i and 4j to 6j P.M. 



BROKERS. 



REMOVAL! 

JW. Brown A Co.. Stock and Money Brokers, have re- 
« moved to No. 817 Montgomery street, Nevada Block, 
J. \V. Brown, Mem. S. F. Stock and Exch. Board. [Jan. 3.) Gko. S. BKOWX 

Albert A. Hhkox. Thomas Stbel, h. G. Kuiil. 

Kl III,. STEEL, AHT» IIICKOX, 

Stock Brokers, 302 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. 



[10-2. 

D. G. SC0FIE1D & CO., 

(lominissiou Stock Brokers, buy ami sell nil stocks, and 
J carry same on margin. Kooms aud 7, No. 315 California street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. - Jan. 15. 

JAMES H. LATHAM & CO, 

Stock nnil Money Brokers, -111 California street. San Frai_- 
cisco. Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. Money loaned on Stocks. 
Stocks bought and carried on margins. Jan. 8. 

SiiEr.wnon Callaghan] NOTICE OF REMOVAL.. [Jeremiah Lvscn. 

C^allas'han, Lynch A- Co. have removed to No. 104! LciiiesiEorfT 
J street, near corner of Halleck. Jan. 8. 

JOHN G. AYEES, 

Late of Ayres, Cope«V Co., will negotiate loans, and buy and 
sell stocks of every description on commission. Olhce : No. 307 Montgomery 
street (Nevada Block.) Jan. 8. 

SAfoUEL McKEE & CO., 
rokcrs and Dealers in Stock Privileges, Pnts and Calls, 

124 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Jan. 1. 



B 



A. A. Hickox.] HICKOX, KOHL & C0-, [H. G. Kiiil. 

Stockbrokers, 302 Sansome street, corner California, are 
now prepared to buy and sell Stocks on Commission, and loan money on 
Stocks. All orders intrusted to our care will receive our most careful attention. 10 2. 



Edwin F. Child, S. F. Stock Exchange. George E. Mao l* ire. 

CHILD & MAGUIBE, 

Commission Stock Brokers, 133 California street.— Stocks 
Bought, Sold and Carried on Margins. Liberal Advance on active accounts. 
Sight and Time Drafts on National Bank of Republic, New York, in sums to 
suit. June n. 

E. P. PECKHAM, 

(Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock Ex- 
j change, 413 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive prompt execution and return. 
[Jjine. 19. j 



E. CAHILL & CX, STOCKBROKERS, 
406 flTontgomery Street. 



Dec. 11. 



HUBBARD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers. 322 and 321 California street, 
San Francisco, will transact business through the San Fraucisco Stock and Ex- 
change Board. July 17- 

D. M. Hosmer.] HOSMER & BOURNE, [J. B. Boukne. 

Stock Brokers, lie Halleck Street. San Francisco. Fost- 
olhce Address, Lock Box ItiSf. August 7. 

F. G. BERRY, 

Late of Berry A- Capp, Commission Stock Broker. Office at 
former place of business, -418 Montgomery street. Sept. 18. 

J. C WXNANS, 
Stock Broker, 319 California street. Nov. 6. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 29, 1876. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 



d can fly far and^lde.— 
\r.\RBi'RTo\\ " With the ftdftptaWiity of a He, aln Hal many tools, lint a li~I« the 



A lie has no lees, atul cannot Btand ; bat it liaa wings, 



handle w'lYlcii" ills rln-ni iill— L^ord BrouGD \m. A lie begets "others j one lie must be 
thatcbed Willi another or It will sooti rain tlirouijh.— Lord Thcrlowe. 

" And the Parson made It Ills text that week, and lie said likewise, 
That a lie which Is half a Ik- Is ever (lie lilnrkest <■' lies ; 
That a lie that is* all a lie may be met ami nciL'lit Willi ■•utri^bt. 
But a lie which is part a truth is a harder matter io (tent."— Tennyson. 

City Lies.— That Frank Warren m:iv be expected down on his monthly 
visit to the- " Black Domino."-^— That Burns has negotiated with Kimball 
& Co. for a portable track to move the new ledger from the desk to the 
safe. That the small boy is not expected to live, Mr. Burns haviny: in- 
terviewed Jimmy McGinn as to his prospects of recovery.— —That Geo. 
Conklin is "frawley" wild on Market street— That Ed. ^Prentiss 
thinks the corner O'Farrell and Mason good for prospecting.— -That Ed. 
Foley*s lungs have given out, much to the gratification of his friends.— 
That Heath's printer went hack on him in regard to maps of the Pre- 
sidio.— —That the new Fire Surveyor at the California Insurance Com- 
pany gets along splendidly with the ladies.— That Patsy Hogan gets a 
commission for soliciting printing for 0. W. Lieb.— It is not true 
that Dr. Stout took a bath in Mission Creek, clothing himself after im- 
mersion with a '/ac" scum. This being carefully removed and placed in 
Howard's crucible, with numerous witnesses (embraced in a working 
body called public opinion), turned to a veritable auriferous m-ltoir.— It 
is not true that Lick has a bath of calf's blood every morning, with cut- 
lets and blood puddings for the boarders. 

S uraminto Lies, on the occasion of calico ball for the benefit of the 
H.-uard Benevolent Society.— 'Tis true that Mrs. P.'s hair was natural 
at tie- calico ball on Monday night. That she felt unhappy when dancing 
a quadrille.— That Miss Hattie G. sold pure Havana cigars. That her 
hair came down whilst dancing.— —That H. M. R. had any cosmetic on 
his mustache. That he did not think himself admired by the ladies. 

That green is a becoming color (in a dress coat). That Diury Melone 

had a button-hole bouquet.— —That Miss Jennie B. desired dancing more 
than to preside over the stereoscopic views.— That N— c— y made an 
efficient noor manager.— That J. M. E. was at the calico ball. —That 
W. A. S. thought himself the handsomest man on the floor. That he 
did not care to dance with Miss G. That he was particular about keep- 
ing time with the music. 

San Jose Lies. — It is not true that I. Abrahams warrants his cigars 
to smoke better than his best coal.— That Lemoine is proticent in 
"gammon."— —That John F. Faulkner can tell barouches of his own 

manufacture without looking at them, That he knows the noise of the 

wheels a block distant.— That W. W. Leland has a permanent suite of 
rooms at the " Palace."— That W. A. January is always behind the times 
after the first month in the year has passed.— That J. A. Yaell was 
ever charged with " uttering a yell of delight."— That C. E. Whittier 
r-i.iudsti.to much time in his orchard.— That A. St<-iger is San Jose's 
main man. That Colohan's partner is too nearly related to the grave- 
yard business.— That Tommy Byrne always spoils his photographs by 
laughing, to secure clients for Life Policies.— That Gennaro Setta's 
chairs are as soothing as the potions of the historical Borgia. —That 
Charley Silent has the " gift of the gab"' in an eminent degree. —That 
A. Lotey is a lover of harmony, especially " thorough Bass."— That F. 
Atler loves water as a seal loves fish.— That V. B. Reader has a natural 
enmity against loungers.— That Brassy & Co.'s clerks need but one 
qualification— "plenty of cheek. S U— That G. W. Helming is suffering 
from the " Granger Fever."— That the three Cory's are going to con- 
solidate to prevent unpleasant mistakes.— That Louis Hess is ''the 
ladies' mini." — —That C. W. Kennedy has ordered a "suit of black." in 
which he will make a debut as " Hamlet."— That Luther is a good judge 
of horseflesh— in a born ; that he always asks M. Brien's advice and 
gets sold : that he disturbed the sleepers in the next room by reheai singj 
until after midnight, "To be or not tube?"— That Albert Lake carries 
a strawberry box in his vest pocket.— That Joseph Enright consumes 
his own smoke.— That E. F. M. Hulburt displays his potions under a 

microscope. — -That Eugene Aram is an ardent student of Bulover. 

That Barker says he is the only man that can keep Towne awake after 
eleven v. u. — —That M. Bloom has only one reason for wearing a rose- 
colored necktie.— That Louis Krumb thinks beer is better than bread. 
■——That Gibson enjoys every allusion to his " snow-white partner; " that 
both of them are experts at " fleecing."— That J. A. Hatch ever in- 
dulges in quixotic attacks ; that the result is that he sometimes finds the 
wind taken out of his sails.— That Carmichael has a musical laugh ; 
that his friends enjoy his company more than a " minstrel show." ■- That 
M. O'Brien is all sweetness to the young ladies of San Jose.— —That 
Thomas Byrne likes to be called the candid young man;" that his 
juvenile friends always attack the pockets of his overcoat; that they 
always get more than their " trouble for their pains."—-™ That the ladies 
at the Auzerais House would like to wear mourning for the gallant freight 

clerk of the S. P. R. R. Co. That San Jose will soon have another 

"• Granger Epidemic." — —That Gillett is the most popular driver on the 
road.— That Dr. Turner is in want. 

Santa Qbuz Lies.— It is not true that Brownstone has any bad 
habits.^— That Jim Stevens is not a moralist.— -That Ed Heacock is 
one.— That J. H. Besse ever fails to come from Watson ville once a 
month to collect his rents. That he known when his nose is red. That it 
is blood that discolors it.— > That Ed. Terry milks cows for a living.— 
That Eil. Hewett's manner is seductive.— That Charlie Perry knows 

what to call his baby. That it depends on— stocks.— That Dave Wil- 
son's tailor lives in Illinois.— That McCormick will ever buy any more 
Ophir.— That Judge Craig is unassuming in appearance. That his ap- 
pearance does not belie his character.— That Coblentz has had his in- 
surance policy renewed. That Brack is a brick.— That Schwartz likes 
to be noticed. That it is his fault if he is not.— That Thompson don't 
Hke to sen his name in print. That the public wouldn't like to see it in the 
police news.™— That Will Cooper wants another masquerade, so as to ex- 
hibit his graceful form. That Be is proud of it. "—That Perry's brains 
are .stocked with stocks and something else. That that something else 
will soon obtain control of all other faculties.— That Hermann P. will 
survive his present mental condition. That his friend, Windsor Castle, 
is recovering from the same complaint. ■ ■ That West will not allow the 
[Continued on Tw ifth Page.] 



THE NEWS LETTER'S MEDICAL BILL. 
Dear News Letter: — Your Medical Bill, published on the 8th inst., 
is an honest and energetic measure ; but it is not practicable, and will 
never be passed by any lay assembly in the world, much less by the Cali- 
fornia Legislature. 

Your first section deprives the inhabitants rf this coast of one of their 
dearest and most prized privileges — that of being medically treated by 
perfect ignoramuses. Common mortals may prefer to die secundum ttrtt m 
in the true old^shioned slyle, but Californians are above such old-fash- 
ioned prejudices. They worship mystery, mesmerism, astrology, and 
such like wisdom, and they would oot die nappy if you succeeded in car- 
rying your bill. No, sir. the independence of the human intellect is not 
going to be confined within the miserable limits of orthodox medicine. 
The noble art of killing is not to'be the exclusive right of any privileged 
class in this free country; and greatly as I respect your efforts to put down 
humbugs and professors with forged diplomas, you will find yourself un- 
able to deprive this intelligent community of the right of selecting their 
own doctors, and if these same Docs, should be unable to spell, pray what 
is that to you ? 

The sections relating to the record of diplomas, and the conditions un- 
der which Calif ornian diplomas will be legally received, are most excel- 
lent, and if you would provide for the periodical publication of the records 
you will do much towards enabling the public to distinguish between 
those wdio have been educated for the practice of their profession in a sim- 
ple mundane fashion, from those who are inspired of heaven or the other 
power. You might add a section forbidding the employment of men 
whose names are not upon the register, and make it a misdemeanor for 
any one to pretend that he is other than the register declares. I also fear 
that the regular doctors with diplomas will scarcely thank you for your 
great interest in their dignity and honor. To think of any member being 
placed at the mercy of any twelve reputable citizens ; Why, sir. it would 
not be difficult to get up a petition against the purest and most upright 
physician in the city. And may 1 ask how you, sir. would like to be 
charged before three of your fellow journalists with divulging professional 
secrets, or with misconduct calculated to prove dangerous to the public, 
and upon your being proved guilty to the satisfaction of any two or them, 
that you should be deprived of the privilege of practicing journalism in 
this State? Why, sir, if you were as pure as Jeptha's daughter, these 
irresponsible parties would condemn you, and the more certain because 
you stand at the head of your profession, and are a power in the State. 

Your last, section is equally impracticable. The medical profession is 
not as yet in a position to dictate what the curriculum of study and exam- 
ination shall be. It is not trusted sufficiently by the public. Where are 
the men who could be appointed to determine whether a given examina- 
tion is or is not sufficient? Under the very best code of regulations some 
fools will inevitably creep in, and if every fool with a diploma is to be 
arraigned on the oath of any reputable citizen, how shall the wise be safe? 

But to descend to common sense, medical legislation is not an easy sub- 
ject to deal with. It must proceed by easy steps, ami destroy no vested 
rights. You will have to remember that quacks have rights, money, and 
friends. Let them alone, and pray do not make martyrs of them. 

Your Act would then stand amended as follows: 

Preamble — An Art for Securing the Registration of Medical Diploma*) 
and the periodical publication of the, Register, 

Sectiok 1. — It shall be the duty of the County Recorder to receive and 
examine the diploma or diplomas of medical practitioners residing and 
practicing within his jurisdiction, and upon receiving reasonable assurance 
of their being genuine and in accordance with the following regulations, 
shall record the same, and forward a copy of the record to the head record 
office of the State. (Form of record to be scheduled. 1 

First. — Provided that the diploma or diplomas shall have been granted 
by any duly constituted authority, legally authorized to issue the same. 
m any State of the United States, or in the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland, or its colonies, or in any state of Europe. 

Si cond. — In the case of students of medicine enrolled at any legally con- 
stituted medical school in this State, proof shall be required that they 
have kept their terms and pursued their studies for two years before ob- 
taining the diploma they propose to register. 

Thin/. — In the case of students wdio may be enrolled at any legally con- 
stituted school of medicine in this State, after the passing of this Act, 
proof shall be required that they have kept their terms and pursued their 
studies for three years before obtaining the diploma they propose to 
register. 

Fourth. — No diploma shall be registered which has been granted for a' 
money consideration only, and without previous medical study and per- 
sonal examination. 

Fifth.— No diploma shall be registered of any practitioner who has been 
convicted of malpraxis, abortion, or felony, or who shall have suffered im- 
prisonment for a period of 365 days; and the name of any person so con- 
victed shall be instantly erased from the register. 

Sec. 2. — Any person who shall fraudulently file, or attempt to file, with 
any Recorder any document which has been obtained by purchase only, 
or which is not his own, or any forged or false documents of any character 
whatever, in connection with medical qualifications, shall be -guilty of a 
felony, and upon conviction by any court of competent jurisdiction shall 
be subject to imprisonment in the State Prison for a period not exceeding 
ten years. 

Sec. 3.— The County Recorder shall be entitled to the usual fee for en- 
tering these records, and shall within. months transmit a copy of the 

same to the State record office. 

g EC> 4.— The State Recorder shall cause to be published twice a year, 
viz., on the 1st of January and the 1st of July, in each year, a copy of 
the register of medical diplomas, with the names, residences, and several 
qualifications, and the date when they were obtained ; and he shall from 
time to time take such steps as may be necessary to correct the register 
by removing therefrom the names of such persons who have died, or wdio 
have ceased to reside or practice in this State. 

Sec. 5. — It shall not be lawful to appoint to any public office or em- 
ployment of trust and emolument, to which medical or surgical duties are 
attached, any rlfedical or surgical practitioner who is not registered under 
this Act, and the Auditor shall disallow, if appointed, their salaries and 
fees. 

Seo. 6.— Any person who shall at any time falsely represent himself as 
registered under this Act shall be deemed guilty of misdemeanor, and 
[For conclusion see Thirteenth Page.] 



Postscript 



to tpp 







CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Office— <sor to ain Merchant !<li-<-«-t. 



VOLUME 26 



SAN FRANCISCO. JAN 29 1876. 



NUMBER 1 



BIZ. 



The current month of January has not been fruitful in any commer- 
cial trantta -tinna ■■!" s|mn ial importance : in fact, busi 

tcparbnent, with no - to note. Money 

■ more and more plentiful i 

igementto the affriculturiat miner, mi ■ 
ohant ami ship-owner. The arrival* from sea during the week include six 

: . . V ,-,, Bor- 

lera from China and 
ti re. 

We remark an advance in the price of Australian Coals, cargo s::]^ 

'. , ( ; .-iii 26 a 810 "iii. which i-- a material rise. 
There is some up ing existing in the Bag market, con 

able contracl arrive next 

Summer upon the baste of 10c, I ! tre held at lie, lOjc offered. 

Sacks are more in demand, witb Bales x<> some extent at 45 a 50c. 
• Coffee is yet without mbt ling arrivals of the new crop from 

I America. The present range of the market 20@22c for fair to 

rre< ii-. 
Ca3e Goods — We have to notice a purchase of 500 cs Oregon S ilmon, 
1 lb this, \ ir exp irt, at $1 60 [■ doz. The stock of this description i.s well 
i r sized tins a) ■ more plentiful. 
California Powder has been manufactured during 1873 at Santa 

■ ' 243 kegs, 1,223 hf kegs, 4,305 qr kegs, 2,3 .7 cs, and929 

hfes. The consumption of Blasting Powder upon the Pacific slope, and 

competition from Eastern factories, prices are kept down 

Metals. — The market is overstocked with Pig and other Irons, Tin 
: mtinue to rule low for all descriptions. 

Syrups. — We note a purchase of 3,000 bbls California Golden for the 
Lon Ion market, to be forwarded by the ship Prince Rupert. Price, 25(3 

■_•:' ■. 

Quicksilver. — The market is but feebly sustained. This being Chinese 

Nfv.- Y"ear Holiday weekj these people ignore business to a great extent. 

liiial price, but s-d L -s for cash have been made at 574c. The 

■ its to an increased pro luct in 1876 and a prospect of 

lower prices aay, 50<§ 55 •. 

Rice. — ' 'in' stocks of China are laru r e and the demand at the moment 
tight. Vv e quote mixed at 5§c; No. 1 China, o^iVj; No. 2 do, 5&(5 5§c; 
Hawaiian, . pr7ic. 

Spices — At auction, 5c; Nutmegs Bold at OO.'.e; 50 bags Pepper, 14V; 
market dull. 

Sugar. — 1, ate arrivals from Honolulu have replenished our stores of 
Hawaiian, and with a good demand from tin.' trade, No. 1 commands L0 1 
lb'; low rad «, 8 e9 : California Crushed, 12«12.';c; Bay Cube, 

r:. t!2 c; Yellow Coffees, lOallc. 

Tsa3. — A.n auction sale was held this week, but not a success. Paper 
[Fapans -Id at 40 « 41c. 

Borax. — There continues to be some export demand for Concentrated, 
30 tons sold private, say ti,* a 7c, 100 cases Refined, private, Bay 1' <i 9Je. 

Freights and Charters. — Quite a number of ships have been secured 
this week t" load Wheat for the United Kingdom. The ship St. John, to 
Liverpool direct at £2 (a large carrier), the British iron ship Weymouth (a 
3mall carrier), to Liverpool or London, gets £2 its., other vessels chartered 
to Liverpool at £2 2s. (3d., vessels to load for U. K. in Columbia liiver 
get £3 10s. 

■Wheat. — The export demand for United Kingdom is continued even 
in til- face of a declining market. Purchases during the week embrace 
several full cargoes on shipowners' account and upon orders. Good to 
jjjhoice parcels have sold at $1 85to$l 95$ cental, as extremes. Our 
receipts of Wheat from the interior for the past seven months (current 
harvest year) show a large falling off as compared witli a like period for 
the two preceding years— say, 1S74-5, 2,800,000 centals ; 1873-4, 1,300,000 
centals. The figures of receipts this season are 5,000,000 centals. Our 
gxports of Wheat for seven months past are 4,559,043 centals ; 1874-5-, 
5,329,883 centals. The present outlook for the growing crops is exceed 
jngly cheerful. Thus far we have had a full average rainfall— say, 16.25 
inches ; in fact, more than for a like period the two past seasons. 

Barley. — The advance early in the week does not seem to be fully sus- 
tained. The snow upon the mountains interrupting freight trains, no 
floubt has something to do with this. "We quote feed .?1 20 a SI 25 ; Brew- 
ing, SI 30 a SI 35 J? cental. 



Hops. — Sto ■'.■■■than an average, and the market weak, at 

Hides— Supply five. Dry, 13a 15c. ; West Salted, 6| a 

Tallow. — ! :■ tnandisgood. The Voyag r for Liverpool, car- 

ried 11,000 lbs. : the Fernoa, for same, is loadin . Pri :e, 6$ al\c. 

Wool. — The market is almost bare, pending the arrival of bhe Spring 

clip, which will be Large. A Few small invoices of 'tbern Fleece held at 

17c, and for which 15c is offered. Burry and inferior c M at 10c 

or l 33, 

Butter and Cheese. — The market is in a fair way to be 9urf- ited with 
fresh grass Butter, and the price has already dropped to 30 I 32 fori 
I b] I tie box, vi ' ili a rood article in quantities can be purchased at 

~-\u> 28c cheese is quite scarce at 1 1(2 L7c. Eggs are scarce at 42i@47c. 



THE CENTENNIAL BOOK! 
Some time since the idea occurred to the well-known publishers, 
Messrs. Vertue & Vorston, of London and New York, to mark the Ameri- 
can i lentennial by issuing a book, illustrating the progress of this country 
during the pasl ci itury. They engaged the interest and services of Mr. 
* '. Edwards Lester, author of the " Glory and Shame of England 
other works of similar character. With their facilities for executing tin- 
finest engravings, they are already able to show that it will be when c >m- 
pleted a literary and historical treasure worthy of being prized and kept as 
an heirloom in families for future generations. Mr. Lester is anxious 
that no part of the country should be unrepresented in the work, and it 
was by nisespecial desire that Mr. K. C. Berford, a pioneer of '40, con- 
sente I to make the journey here to collect the necessary stritistics of Cali- 
fornia, and effect arrangements for the subscription and - m of the work. 
'I'ii. work is entitled " American Advancement," is a beautiful quarto vol- 
ume of about a thousand pages, containing one hundred of the finest steel 
plate illustrations, being bound in Turkey morocco, with double clasps, 
making it a most elegant and appropriate volume for the center table of 
parlors, A ropy of the work, as far as completed, can be seen at the book 
store of H. H. Moore, 000 Montgomery street, near Clayi; 



A case of some importance to shippers has been before the Queen's 
Bench. A firm in New York shipped a cargo of wheat to England ; on 
the voyage the wheat got damp through heavy weather. The ship put 
into Queenstown, where the bulk of the wheat was taken out of the ves- 
sel by the owners and kiln dried. When the consignees (the plaintiffs) 
asked for delivery of the wdieat, the owners (the defendants) demanded 
£210, the cost incurred by kiln-drying. This was paid under protest, and 
the action referred to was brought to recover this amount. The question 
to be decided was. Were the defendants justified in incurring the expense 
of kiln-drying the wheat for the purpose of reshipment ? The jury 
answered in the affirmative. 



Washing Woolen3. — Prof. Arms, who has devoted himself to the 
dis iovery Of the reason why woolen clothing, when washed with soap and 
water, will insist upon shrinking and becoming' thick, and acquiring that 
peculiar odor and feeling which so annoys housekeepers, says these evil 
effects are due to the decomposition of soap by the acids present in the 
perspiration and other waste of the skin which the clothing absorbs. The 
fat of the soap is then precipitated upon the wool. These effects may be 
prevented by steeping the articles in a warm solution of washing soda for 
several hours, then adding some warm water and a few drops of ammonia. 
The woolens are then to be washed out and rinsed in lukewarm water. 



A Big Lump of Condensed Milk. — A sample of condensed milk 
weighing about 112 pounds, was lately exhibited at the rooms of the So- 
ciety of Arts in London, and an interesting experiment made thereon. 
This mammoth piece of solidified fluid was prepared by Hooker's process, 
It has been exposed to the action of the air for four years and three 
months, yet its quality was so excellent that in a few minutes it was re- 
solved, by churning into good fresh butter. This trial was only one of a 
series made at the International Exhibition, South Kensington, and else- 
where. In each case the same satisfactory result was obtained. 



The firm of Russell & Sturgis (Manila) resumed business on the 
evening of the 23th November, under the superintendence of Mr. Vincente 
A. Barretto. — Hongkong Daily Press. 

The best artists are engaged to make accurate portraits of the " Men 
We Know." 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 29. 



" MID-WATCH. " 
With throbbing breast and eager eye 

I watclj each dark, o'erhanging cloud, 
With waves that strike our trembling bark, 

My heart beats time aloud-; 
And as the fretful moon looks through 

The spray clouds in the air, 
I wonder if it looks on you 

To-night, my love ! my fair! 

Up from our way the sleeping gulls, 

Awakened by the mast-head light, 
Start from their wave-tossed rest, in fear, 

And, clamoring, fly off through the night ', 
I mark the white glint of their wings, 

Their wild screams of despair, 
And wish that I could follow them 

To you my love ! my fair ! 

I see the phosphorescent gleams 

That make the waves seem gemmed with light, 
And deem them like the eyes of her 

Who fills my heart to-night; 
And though the glittering waves hide death, 

I have no heed nor care, 
If they but light me back again 

To you, my love ! my fair ! J, K. s. 

THE MINING COMMISSION. 

The bill establishing a Banking Commission is now before the Leg- 
islature, ami its passage is an almost foregone conclusion. The N< W8 L< t- 
l< r is proud to have been the 6rst in pointing out the necessity of such an 
inquisition as a means of conserving the public welfare. It now remains 
for the legislators to supplement this good work by another of equal im- 
portance. We allude to a Mining Commission, the need of which has often 
been demonstrated in these columns. Who will be the Man to carry it 
through the Legislature, and earn the gratitude of every Califormaii and 
of every invester in stocks throughout the country? 

With such a guarantee, foreign capital will be no longer timid, but flow 
in a golden stream to our sources of investment. The rock-ribbed fast- 
nesses of the Sierras, from the frozen North to the tropical South, will be 
penetrated by its Argus eyes, and the pleasant hum of mining industry be 
heard where now silence reigns supreme. Every industry on the Coast 
will feel its benign influences) and our own beloved State will be made to 
blossom as a garden of roses. 

Again we ask who shall be this great benefactor? Shall it be you, Frank 
McOoppin, from whom we have a right to expect much, or you, Mr. Chair- 
man of Corporations, Farley ? Who shall wear the golden laurel? We 
give in full the News Letter's bill herewith : 

An Act to Establish a Mining Commission fob the State of 
California. 

Sec. 1. The People of the State of California do hereby ordain and es- 
tablish a State Mining Commission. 

SEC, '2. The said Commission shall consist of one Commissioner with an 
annual salary of $3,000, and one Secretary with an annual salary of 
■S2,400. Both of said officers to be appointed by, and hold office during 
the pleasure of, the Governor. And the said Commissioner and Secretary 
shall each file a bond with the Secretary of the State in the sum of $20^000, 
in l r . S. gold coin, with good and sufficient sureties, for the faithful per- 
formance of their duties. The Attorney-General of the State shall be ex 
officio Attorney of the Commission, and shall receive therefrom a salary of 
£1,000 per annum. 

SEC. 3. The duties of the Commissioner shall consist in requiring from 
every mining company, incorporated under the laws of the State, an an- 
nual report, to be rendered during the month of January in each year, of 
their condition and affairs, together with a report of their operations for 
each current year, beginning with the year 1876. He shall also require 
each of said companies to file in Ins office, for public inspection, a semi- 
monthly sworn statement of each certificate of capital stock outstanding, 
giving the number of certificates, number of shares and in whose name 
standing, commencing with the lowest numbered certificate and thence fol- 
lowing seriatim. He shall require the President or Vice-President, and 
Secretary of each mining company, to file with him, before an assessment 
- is levied, a sworn statement of the condition and affairs of said company, 
together with an account of receipts and expenditures since the date Of 
the last dividend or assessment, setting forth the necessity of the assess- 
ment about to be levied ; whereupon the Commissioner may issue a permit 
to the trustees of said company to assess its capital stock, but no such 
assessment shall be legal or valid without such permit of the Commissioner. 
He shall require every mining company to bank its funds in the name of 
the corporation, subject to checks sinned by the President or Vice-President 
and Secretary of the same. He shall require the funds of every mining 
company to be kept intact for its own proper corporate uses. The Com- 
missioner shall have power, upon any stockholder filing with him a sworn 
statement to the effect that the property or funds of his company are being 
mismanaged or appropriated, or that such is the case to the "best of his 
knowledge and belief, to employ sworn experts to examine into and report 
upon the company's books and papers ; to examine under oath and require 
the presence of necessary witnesses to have full access to all property- 
bopks, papers and title deeds. Said examination to be made.at the own 
proper cost of the company so examined, but nevertheless the Commas- 
sinin.T shall cause any stockholder requesting such examination to file a 
bond in the sum of $500, in U. S. gold coin, with good and sufficient sure- 
ties (or the deposit of a like sum in gold coin), which, if the charges are 
not sustained upon thorough examination, shall be declared forfeited, and 
the necessary costs of said examination shall be reimbursed to the com] (any 
out of the proceeds of said bund, and, if any balance shall remain, it shall 
In- returned to said stockholder or to his sureties. Whenever, upon thor- 
ough examination, it shall appeal' that the funds or property of any min- 
ing company are being, or have teen, appropriated or mismanaged by the 
officers or trustees, or by any of them, then the Commissioner shall have 



power to remove such officer, or officers, or trustee, or t- ustees, and, when 
necessary, to call a stockholders' meeting at twenty day's notice, for the 
purpose of electing a new Board of Trustees ; provided, however, that no 
officer or trustee shall be eligible to office after such removal. Pending 
such election, the Com&issioner may appoint officers ad vnterim. The 
Commissioner shall require every mining company to post in its office, on 
or before th#15th of each month, a monthly balance sheet written up to 
the 1st of said month, for the convenient inspection of stockholders, cred- 
itors imd others; and shall require every company to afford the stock- 
holders thereof full access to all books, papers, title deeds and property of 
the * lorporation. He shall also have the power to examine into the condi- 
tion and affairs of every mining company without previous notice, and, 
for that p^i-'ose, to require and inspect all books, papers, title deeds and 
property. 

Sec. 4. The duties of the Secretary shall consist in tabulating and other- 
wise arranging the annual reports of the various mining companies, and 
transmitting a copy of the same to the Secretary of State at Sacramento. 
The originals of all papers of the Commission must be retained in the 
office of the same. The Secretary shall have charge of the seal of tin.' ' !om- 
mission, with which all official documents must be stamped, and of all re- 
ports and other papers furnished by said mining companies which he shall 
conveniently keep for public inspection. He shall keep the records of all 
official examinations of mining companies, and tile them in the office of 
the Commission. He shall act as examiner of witnesses in conjunction with 
any counsel that may lie furnished by complaining stockholders. He shall 
sign all official documents jointly with the Commission. 

Seo. 5. The Attorney-General of the State shall Vie the legal adviser of 
the< lommission, and. upon requisition of the Commissioner, shall enter and 
conduct all suits in the name of the people. He shall also defend all suits 
which may be brought against the Commission. 

Sec. 6. The office of the Commission shall be located in the city and 
county of San Francisco, in such place as the Commissioner may select, pro- 
vided that it be separate from other offices, ami the rental of the same 
shall not exceed $200 pel- month. Tin * Commissioner shall appoint a janitor, 
who shall also serve as messenger, at a salary of $9G0 per annum. All 
salaries and expenses of the Commission shall lie liquidated by warrants 
on the State Treasurer, and charged to the general fund. 

Sec. 7. The violation of any provision of this Act, or the refusal to 
abide by the same, renders the person or persons, so violating or refusingj 
guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by a line not less than £200, nor more 
than $5,000, or by imprisonment of not less than 10 days nor more than 
SIX ii lout lis. or by both such tine and imprisonment ; and it is provided that 
for the convenience of the Commissioner and of stockholders, the Secretary 
of any mining company shall be the intermediary between the said ( !om- 
missioner and stockholders and the trustees and officers of said com puny, and 
the violation of, or refusal to abide by, the provisions of this Act, on the 
part of said Secretary, shall be construed as a misdemeanor in the persons 
of all the officers and trustees, and shall be punishable upon their several 
persona as hereinbefore provided. 

Sec. 8. All acts or portion of acts conflicting with the provisions herein 
contained are hereby repealed. 

Sec. 0. This Act shall take effect immediately. 

WIRE AND WIRE ROPE FOR SALE Iff STOSE OR IN BOND. 
B ,*£/\rf> miles, Nos. S ami 9, Oalvaiiizo;! Telegraph Wire. 

J_«»Jn.P 1 W 'AiO Toils (iiilvanized Wire Hope for Ship Kinging-, hi More— All kinds 
of Wire, Galvanized on Black Iron, Brass, Copper, Steel, Market, Stone, Spring, 
Tinned, etc., etc. In Stock and Made to Order - 

1!H,\SS AND IRON WIBB CLOTH, 
Battery Screens, Fly Cloth, Ore Screens. Sand Screens, Wire Netting, Galvanized or 
nol ; Ornamental Wire Work of all kinds, Staples, Biddies and Seivea of nil kinds, 
Flower Stands, Summer Houses, and everything that can be made from Wire. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 Fine street, S. F. 

w;re rope. 

lat ami rouml. of Iron or Steel, on hand or made to order, 

of uuecuialed excellence. Picture Cords, Sash Cords, etc., etc. 
Jan. 22. A S. HALL1DIK, 1.13 Pine street. 



F 



J. H. CUTTER'S OLD BOURBON AND RYE WKISBY, 
aiiul'nctured by Milton J. Hardy A Co.. Sons-in-Law and 

Successors of J. II. Cl'TTBB, Louisville. Ky. E. MARTIN & CO., 

August 14. No. 406 Front street, Sole Agents for the Pacific Oast. 



M 



J. C. MERRILL & CO., 

Wholesale Auction I&ouse, 204 mul 206 California street. 
Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 A.M. Cash advances on consign. 

me: it-. Dec. 14. 

SHARP & 1L0YD 

Have Removed their Ofliecs to Rooms Nos. ». 10. 11. 12 and 
B> on the Se< mal Floor, Nevada Block, Xunhwest Corner Pine and Montgi m- 
erv streets. Entrance on Montgomery street ; also, ou Tine. The Rooms are on 
Pine street side of the Building. Dec. IB. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October nth, 1S75.] 

Sure death to Squirrels. Bats, Gophers, etc. For sale by ;ill 
Druggists, Grocers and General Dealers. 



Q. STEELE & CO., San Francisco, Cal. 



Price. $1 per box. Made by JAMES 
Liberal discount to the Trade. Aug, 21. 



WANTED, 

By a respectable and industrious young; mini, a situation 
in a first-class house as Salesman or Assistant Bookkeeper, liest of references 
given. Address " K.," this ottice Jan. 22. 

ELLIS READ, 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

June 12.1 310 Clay Street San Francisco. 

G. H. MUMM & CJ.'S CHAMPAGNES. 

Dry Verzcnay, quarts and pints: Extra Dry, quarts and 
pints. Kl'llL BROS., Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 522 Montgomery street, San 
Frui ciseo. Dec. IS, 

CHARLES LE liAY, 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Kuc Scribe, Paris. 



Jan 29. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



TELEGRAPHIC DOTTINOa 

The Gcor^ invention « ii — 

| liy the 

: I 1 '. nn-vl 

. 

ill b "t March, 

i nmittev "t th 

■ 

■ I -^— Negotiati 

iiiislii|> t torn- 

. in favor ol : -u nnJ 

. -^— Tin- minority of tli<- House Judi- 

. the term of i anient 

irs.— —In the I'ni- 

pleaxfcd guilty 

u ■ : 11. 1'. Klli-. I». W I 
H \ \ ; I 

infield, Henrj l an 1 Willi. •» 

; WHliai t II kgar, bookkoeper. ' Since the uomrail 

iun1 "f money from B. T. B 
\ ■ work "ii Bal 

blj bring his embezsl 

.-■...■ 'ni West 

ij l >.»■-. ■ m, fotoph and Hxn 
iitiy. were taken dow and an 

vraa tint th 

— ■'■ 11 | ..■ book ol 

■ ; lualy •■ impli I boldera 

of it as collateral cann >r tell whether th ;ir certifi lul 

genutQ ■•.— — '!' :..... Stock- 

ton, whi ■ -. ; ma who 

p 
. . were fined $10 each. ^— Napa City shows a death 
mly 10.4 : Stoci i fcwith LI. 3 ; Oakland third. 12.6 ; 

fourth, 14 ; and 8 5f h, !1 '.'.— — \ jang of ' 

. lof the narrow- 

radins the line preparatory to Laying the ties, 

— - \ u i barber for the last six 

niniitlis dressed as a man. red by an event 

which i.- likely to happen in every well regulated family,— 'The schooner 

.:'.'<! ill, near Stev I ' linl i atly, and 

the crew m r saved. She collid 

. ' «Sonth Vallejo has sent up to 
hi with over 100 signatures of the leading men in the 
■ ■:■■ Vallejo, claiming that they now have to pay the 
return .—— \ man named Silas has 
[as an ace implies in the recent murder of Adam Schaffer in 
rtty. Silas is a relative of Sohaffer and lives within a mile 
an l a half of -~ ; :haffer'a plac ■. Some land difficulty is now alleged as being 
of the murder. " " A jumping match bas been arranged 
;it Los Angeles betw ten Wesley, the champion runner, and an English- 
\ i [cultural Park, between the 2d and the 8th <-f 
February. It is to be a running lump of four trials, for 51,000 gold cuin. 
^■■The bed "f the California and Oregon Railroad between Marysville 
and Lincoln is being materially strengthened. A gravel train nf twenty- 
■ i -Liily. -—A bold attempt was madeatChico, 
riday night, to capture Wells, Fargo .V Co. 'a express wagon and rub 
I ■■!_■■ a rope across the street near the railroad 
horse struck the rope he broke it, and the driver was 
tried out of liis perilous position. ' ' T he storm at Sacramento, 
Sundaj night, was one of the most severe ever experienced in that locali- 
ty. Several lanre trees were blown down, fences demolished, roofs 
i and lifted, and one «>f the pinnacles on the Methodist Church 
thrown upon the roof during the evening service. David A. Jerome, of 
Michi i " of the Board of Indian Commia- 

— Senator Slierman, of Ohio, has written s letter in which he 
tea the nomination of ' rovernor Hayes for the Presidency.— —The 
remains of ' General ' ford m ( rranger, win. died recently in Santa Fe, have 
been forwarded to Lexington, Kentucky^ for interment. ^^—The Virginia 
tican Association has declared in favor of ex-Speaker Blaine for the 
:andidate forth«next Presidency, t— The Senate Committee 
on Railroads on last Tuesday evening heard arguments by-Tom Scott and 
i '. 1'. Buntington for and against the Texas Pacific subsidy. Stokes 1 
counsel will apply to Judges Pratt and EXickman, of Brooklyn, for a re- 
consideration of their decision in the habeas corpus application for Stokes 1 
release. ■ —The Senate has passed the bill to appoint a Commissioner to 
mo.uire into the extent ami effects of the alcoholic liquor traffic. Senator 
Booth voted for it.— =— The House Committee on Appropriations have re- 
duced the salaries of members of Congress from 85,000 to $4,500 per an- 
num, and proposed to make a general reduction of ten per cent, on sala- 
ries of all civil Government employes.— The Colombian Government 
will soon appoint a * lommission to investigate the condition of the Pana- 
ma Railroad, which is alleged to he in so had a state that $50,000 will be 
required to put it in good running order. 

"The Hon. Her _Maje3ty's Champion" is dead. He died on 
^Tuesday, in South Kensington, and his name was Mr. Henry Lionel 
jPymoke, of Scrivelsly Manm-, Lincolnshire. From the time of Richard 
II., and probably long before that time, the possessor of the Manor of 
Bprivelsly has had a feudal service to perform. Upon the coronation of a 
King or Queen <it England, he had to ride, in full armor, into Westmin- 
ster Kail, proclaim the newly crowned sovereign, throw down his glove, 
and challenge all gainsayers to come forth and maintain their counter- 
claims in single combat. The Dymoke who has just died was the nine- 
teenth of his name who has borne the title of the Queen's Champion. The 
family is a very old one. 



OUR QUACKS. 



The biographies and the portraits will be perfect of the 
We Know." 



'Men 




The longer we on of medical Of. 

fairs, lbs i that It Is a mcei dangerous thine 

unit i you know n bo you are u ua> 

in rlow of the facte I bal have come <" our knowledge, wo feel 

assured thai \\ t- shall ho sqi 

when we pnbltcly ash ,l Have yon a diplomat" If 

, wo will give tliem an idvi itls, n they en il so- 

bvlotift, and Iho duty of tuelr patluntn 
plain. Wo append a llol of practlcln ■ medical men, to whom wenou pul thai 
^noBtlon, We shall add Lo it from time to time, 

Doctors, I lav* Y«« a Diplomat 
\ ei ',!i>'. J F, t rai ■■\\.\-- around. 

■ ii. 
■ i- .-... i ■■ i t Kearny. 
..... II. .; 13 Third 
,,.■-. i i . . vdoli'u, Pn ' Society 

i. Tin. lii (' )ivsii.'i,ins, :.• K-ii ii. . 
I , . Post. 

v \.-.i.-. Bush. 
liiiflv, 'i:'. M irkot. 
r. \ low [N.HS, iil2 i'la\ . 

ioft, ff u, traveling around. 
hmnk«>s, Wm.T ubbV Hotel, Oakl'a. 
i; am in, J J.tmveMnR ground. 

. I'ai'l M. .iriti iii ; iiroiind. 

Urown .i , i colored), 621 Union. 
Rourena, n C F.743 Market. 
Bbro. C.bi ' ■'!" ■■ lis. 
': irter, i B n O'Farrell. 
Bltowx, W Ldtubr, ill) Washington. 

■ . :i, ,i. -Ms sttickton. 
Breed, S fT,8 O'Fftri-o'. 
Barnch, — .'-KG Minna. 
Bri int, CO, ■"• 3 Taylor. 
Blanch ^bo, ii, B'dVay, n*r Stockton. 
iu:\\. Joun E.iffl Kearny. 

, , .Toas.ai i I'acltfc. 
B snnet, vVm, ■:-'. Sixth. 

; .]., A K C, '*Y1\ Mission. 
ii c u, Au/.tT.iis House, S Jom 
Bailey, ". i STchwma, 

V.wrkh, 11.",! .SultrT. 

Blther.Q w.iv.i Sacramento. 

Durr.O, 1 .'"Third. 

Brack, A, Santa Cruz. 

■ iok, AB. £H Post. 

Cook.C \. ;-': Po«t. 

Carr, a L, 1 1J Bnsh. 

Ciiiuil, — , \w> Stockton. 

Clark, Jons Kd, pone to Healdsonrg. 

Close, W N, Cex-Pollooman),82!JMlBa'n. 

Corhett, .2:12 Pacific. 

Czapkay, i^ J, traveling around. 
Cohen, Simon, c oidclo")*')us Kearny. 
Clapp, G il. (Parmer), Sonoma. 
Deane, CT, cor.Montif'yandSatter. 
Doherty, Wra K,6lD01ay. 
Dwyer, Joseph, a»'J Pucific. 
Davis, M, 1033 Mission. 
Dunlnp.A \v.i:-,Siih. 

IV l'.elzini, M, tr;tvi.-ltnK around. 

Dnnnlng.O, S.W. Jackson A; Sansome. 

|).h|.t, I'. !■:. hnef kn:ickcr, W- Kllis. 

•Draper.C P. alias Fox, Oakland. 

Demarest, -i I '. Qll ' lonimerclal. 

Etchers. J.3OT Union. 

K.-ki'l.-l N.:..'.Mi' ary. 

Karl, M R.3^1 Second. 

Elmore, A C,l0l8 Washington. 

Ewlrig, E,a3 Fell, 

Euphrat, Fred (Peddler). Los Angeles. 

I'Nti-.N. .], US Sn.i'l. ii. 

I- i r.i.i... A S.mat'i'Hs-.nak'r. S'UJHow'd. 

Qldiler, . cor (in!; &. U It av. Ala'tla 

Kim'iikk, (.ii:o..(lalioror), :il I Stockton. 
Kiscmcii, i.U:sTAV,ri(Ji Fell. 
Fcrdoniin(lerz.Maiuii-l,J1'> Kearny. 
Frankenberg -l (Shoemaker), t21 Post. 

Finle&n, H. '>!■"' Jackson. 
Fowhbca, I) L, tr ivcllng around. 
Flllmove. I"' (cord cook). 328 Third. 
Fauterbang, Sam. s; "> Pacific. 
French, K 6,461 Minna. 
Flolitner.GiiBtave.gOnelo N. York. 
Flchtner, Charles. ;.C4 Fell. 
Gabda^owskY, A E, IJD53 Broadway, 

Oakland. „ 

Gibbon, J F, cor. Commerc I ft Kearny. 
Gilbert, John F, Ti'.i Broadway. 
Grefrorio, A. Itravellnc round. 

Half-, Dan Vir-il. \m Sac'to. 

Grover, A J, I IS Push. 

G-oss, W, Ii Third. 

Flollnnd. GttStave, late Hospital Stew- 

ar.l.P.;: Bush. ■ 

llAivn. HENRY, alias II W (rng-gath- 

erer). drifting aronnd. 

ii vi. i. ( S ii iSTlNGs (alias Sam), Mil Cftl, 
IL.liz, Paul F, "French Cook," dritt- 
ine about. „ 

Hodgdon, C t„ ]QC8 Howard. 

Hastings, Alonzo Tom, Peddler. 

Malic, [iicliard IJ. l".l '.; Post. 

Handt, CO,B Kearny. 

Ilillcr. D A.33rfPoet. 

Hogle.G, N".W. Jackson & Stockton. 

H,. s -t, . Park- street, Alameda. 

Hartman, A, 1 123 Stockton. 
HolllBter, «i W, I. Montgy, and Oakland. 
Hoffman, Mbs a m. l-ia2 Folsom. 
Howard, W (colored barber), 115D Mis- 
sion street. 
Ilillcr, F, Senior, *J:M Post. 
Horn, Jerome, si 1 -! Post. 
,Ioi:i>an. Lotris J, 311 Geary. 
.Inssclvii. Bcni F. '■]■; Sacramento. 
Jones. \V.m. cor. New Montg & Natoino, 
J08BKLYK, J H,22 i Slitter. 



'■ ,163 Third. 
Janke, K, 91 ■ Po roll, 
Kelly, T R, m Q 

Ki - i if ■■:■.. i irroll. 

KimiK.-i R, Mai k 'i and Bth, 
Ketlej . — . ih Birci i Station, Oakl'd. 
■ i i, Ch is, Qu mh in ititute, 620 
' . ■ teet 
•Lyford, Ben F, itii Kearny. 

1 OOBcheld, Kei VY, g .■ l.-io-rniany. 

la DBLBKf, ! .515 Pino, 
I.i in I. ski, M I., iiii-'i Kiilsurn. 
Loh in, i. F, :ii" M irki E. 
i.c;i\ mi, \. ' iGcary. 
Martin, M P, n:i Folsom. 

M \ iiiiiw, I ILARENCE, Tl Fourth. 

Maxwell, .1 s, iocaroeratod 

Meyer, A \v. -ii Kparny. 

Minor, Il N. S.W. K arnvand Jackson. 

Moi!F.M\.i.,ii.-i: M, li * J T-'iama. 

Mori .o, Wm ll ' Fol«""" 

Meyer, 61 egfrfed graveling around. 

Mete llf, .'.'Mi Franklin, Oakland. 

McGoi crk.C C, II Post. 

M< 5barrno, Archibald, i"avel'p around. 

Mayon.'l H, Alhambra Tlintcr Bullil- 

lue.SiD Bub, 

Moll. N A < .illoTan-ell. 

Murphy, N s, 33] Kearny, 
MuNito, Geo F, hi Post. 
Masou.J li. if. Fifth. 
Mbrbioks. a, traveling round. 

Mar-hall.: M K (eo|or,, ( n, Shi JackBon, 

Morion. Albert, ii O'Farrell. 

Maynard, — .71 Fourth. 

Mathews. T M, 38 Russ. 

Mcrrll, A P. in O'Farrel. 

McConeahy, S W, H»5 California. 

New ton, J i;, traveling aronnd. 

Noble, W H. RuBsHouse. 

o'Vkii.i,, Howard d,. hi Front. 

O'Donnbll.C C,K5 Kearny street. 

Owens, Evan, traveling around. 

Parsons, Lorenzo, 5 1 -J *jrl . cor. Rrannan. 

Prosek, JOSEPH, Assistant Physician 
(ii-riiiati Ilo-,.ital. .M ; Third. 

Piio-.i-h.iLIi, C, IK! Third. 

Pliirliard. -I It i I'.ai'ti-nder), IT Third. 

Pulf.y, K R,SS3 Wa-hiiiL'ton. 

Porter. IJ C, -13' : Clementina. 

QriNLiN, A G.lRTliird. 

QaerlHecg, M, lllfl MCiBsion. 

liichard. h J, traveling around 

RuBsel, E F. ;, post. 

Kftppin, G. 1517 Stockton. 

Pai'imn.F G. travel's round In Idaho. 

Kamloi|ih, p P.. ill Minna. 

RoyerLC Charnes? maker), Idaho. 

Hi:iir..vsi;i-iUJF.R..lAf:nn. Assistant Phy- 
sician German Hospital, 1W Powell. 

Rciral.C OT. T7C. Howard. 

Roll, John, P3J Pacific. 

Roberts, Mrs. H. in Sixth. 

Rowell. Wm P. 28 Stone. 

SBELEY. C M.318 Fourth. 

S( :m:kro,G. 1315 Powell. 

Sherman, J A, 340 Montfromery. 

Stnttmcisl.-r 1£ (Tanner), 109 Dnpont 
and 1RI3 Powell. 

SiiEKnMKit. il.'.Hi Webster. Oakland. 

Selionv.al.l. Franz, S", Third. 

Sanders. D, lO-jfi'./ Dnjiont. 

Szu-vi-li. A S T. i:-V!:i Dnpont. 

Szetskl. Judas. fK4Picmc. 

Smith, El).5 J iSKearnv. 

St.o\v L -,fM. IIOKearny. 
Seizor, Ed\Vard, ,103 Davis. 
SPOSATI, N", Stnckti 
"Summers, II A M. TTli Howard 
Tnlt, J O. Hi Minna. 
Tilt fin, J. R.. 1246 Mission. 
*Tiiomas, Gno. F. traveling round 
Trask.J B, 5)2 Market. 
Tnzer, Charles II, Oakland. 
Thicse. A A, f08 Sntber. 
Treat, J ■ s w. 528 Keamv. 

■Thompson, Wm (alias " Old Dr. T.") U 

Geary. 
TTtter, Henry. ISJ!^ Post. 
Vijronrcaux. A W, cornered & Mission 
Vulcnlinc.r HfcolM coh'rj :;,'5>.i II h 
Vaslil, FS.f.09 Kearny. 
A'nn Kaismcr, C, bootblack, IH'.i Folsom 
Vandenberp, Jr, — , drifting round, 
Wright,.! ff", 5 Kearny, 
Wilson. Wm,G33 Howard. 
Wilson, II Roberrn.au Minna & Oakl'd 

Weber, John, it it Moaon 

Warrew, <> P, corner Broadway and 

Telegraph av, Oakland 
Williams, H, I] ;u Mission. 
Wiiherhv, I .'.':: Fell 
Watt. W A. 22: Second. 
Wii.kiss, T J.815 Bash, 
vniley,Jack.3-il StxBb 
WhIte.SS.22lS Larkin 
Whitmorc, D W.liO; Pine. 

JoSBolyn, W IT. :w Third. 
Those persons whose names appear in Bmftll capitals claimed to have dlplo 

mas from Institutions whose officers re pudiate those claims. 

*nas a diploma from the Quack Medical School ol Philadelphia, that E 
sol i them. 
i^BumEBO B. in mm ii.' bs 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 29. 



Savings Banks of San Francisco, California. 

The semi-annual returns of the San Francisco Savings and Loan Societies, for the six months ended December 31st, 1875, are hereby appended for 
the information of our readers. Few tilings more infallibly indicate the changes to which a community may be financially subject than statistics of 
this character. The monetary status of the working- class may be regarded as furnishing ttfe best evidence of the standing and condition of all others. 
The decrease in the aggregate deposits was $2,872,945, and that in the loans account was $4,229,095. In number of depositors there was a small gain, 
being 975 more, while the decreased average to the credit of each depositor was the large amount of $55 00, being SS15 gold against £870 in July, 1875, 
and S907 in January, 1875, leaving a large margin in favor of the San Francisco depositor over th&t of depositors in the most favored portions of the 
Union. We are only surprised that the series of calamitous events by which we were distressed for several months has not left deeper scars. As it is, 
we can well afford to regard them not only with equanimity, but with the feeling that a victory has been won. 



s 


SMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS TXSTITVTIONS. JANUARY 1, 1876. 






„. ! Date of 
Name. 

[Organizat'n. 


Open Dep't 

Accounts 
Jan. 1, 1876. 


Deposits. 


Loans. 


Gross 
Earnings. 


Reserve 
Fund. 


Expenses 
& Fed'] Tax. 


Aggregate 
Dividend 


Cash 
on hand. 


Dividend Rate. 


Term. 


1 Irdinary. 




10,940 


$11,644,097 


811,611,796 


- 


$400,090 


540.551 


$547,951 


$480,894 




9.00 


Hibernia Savings and Loan Soc. July 23, IN'. 


17,151 


12,900,369 




024.47D 




41, JOS 




498,065 




S.OO 


French Savings and Loan Soc. April 7, 1559 


7.000 


5,637,385 


6,943,758 


305,904 


211. ,32 


20,145 


267,891 


404,661 




9.00 


San Francisco Savings Union... Feb. I, 1860 


6,512 


6,905 224 


0,775,337 


356,059 


236.717 


52,520 


823 533 


107.747 


9.00 


,.50 


Odd Fellows Savings Bank hinel8,1802 


7,985 


7. 121. 900 


6,740,506 


355,404 


31(648 


34,959 


301.537 


514,211 


9.00 


7.30 


Farmers' ami Mech. Sav. Bank. Oct 13. 1866 


655 


507,466 


524,291 


27,070 


75,054 


7.384 


19,686 


77,015 


10.00 


8 and 6 


i lennan Savings and Loan Snc'y July 1, 1867. 


0,000 


6,069,560 


6,173,292 


294,118 


115.000 


27,238 


253,777 


220,004 


9.00 


7.50 


pion. ' r Hank of Sav. & 1 ■.-]■■ ~ i > Feb. 10. 1-05 


3,662 


1,045,976 


1,148,713 


64,114 


" 


7.000 


1 . o 3 


55,515 


12.00 


9.00 


Masonic Savings and Loan Bank Nov. 1, 1869. 


4,130 


1,499,676 


1,361,677 


B2,0S8 


181,829 


11.070 


70,1 IS 


145.005 


9.00 


7.50 


Humboldt Savlngsand Loan Soc Nov. 24, 1509 


1,904 


966.590 


923,648 


47,461 


101,113 


11.-50 


35,489 


72, 51 13 


9.00 


7* and 4 


Security Savings Bank March2,1871 


995 


1,517,798 


1,521,751 


86,976 


150,000 


9,822 




69,087 


O.oO 


7.50 


California Savand Loan SocietylJuly 1, 1573. 


nil 


304,241 


301,132 


8 :,3S7 


300,000 


4,103 


18,680 


14,072 


9.00 


8.00 


Western Savings and Trust Co . 


May 15, 1873 


461 


141,682 


336,175 




268,354 


8,017 


9,268 


15,-0, 


10.00 


8.00 




68,072 


s.-.ii,'>i:o.!k;j 


956,507,447 
56 112 999 






-25. .012 
239,699 

105.513 

134,520 


S2.-1-0.030 
2.457.074 


.-2,720.570 
1,501,193 

2.0. -.100 
1.005,501 














3,209,434 
2,632,932 

2. 17.':. 145 
2,091,055 














2, .ir,7,151 
2,369,926 
2,266,224 












50,843,159 
16,745,1 ' 


2,048,391 

1.010 OKI 










51,807 


46,857,230 














42,828,962 
40,258,918 




i, i26,967 
1,852,770 


187,476 


1, 011.004 
1,818,406 
1.712,000 
1,705,351 
1,592,022 


1,8 10,133 

1,17-1,50.1 
1,588,044 

2,728,825 










40,869,405 




179,671 
135,8X6 
124,559 










1.510.553 








38,670 


34,541,597 




1.7::7. l-lll 


:::::::::: ::::::.... 


Totals— January. 1*71 j 


36,862 

37,136 


31,289,550 
29,842,112 


30,608,376 
29,271,376 


1,772,872 
1,70 1,688 


1,058,030 
962,344 


183,318 

■ .: ; 


1,400,010 
1.440.523 


1.057.272 










Increase. Decrease. 
i ipen Dept Accounts. 30 

Deposits 

Loans 



Hibernia. 

Mylbs. D. Sweeny President. 

EDWARD MARTUI Cashier. 

Increase. Decrease 

Open Dept Accounts 779 

Deposits 8 B13.770 

1,051.201 

Gross Earning 0,019 

Reserve Fund $69,241 

Expenses & Fed. Tax 2,405 

Seini-Annual Div 10,358 

Cash on hand 279,579 

French. 

GU6TAVE IU'SSOL ...President. 

Gustave Maue Cashier. 

Increase. Been ase. 

OpenDeptAccounts 

Deposits $326,983 

I. ■ 104.05, 

Gross Earnings 810,554 

Reserve Fund 14,775 

Expenses S: Fed. Tax 



nines 

Reserve Fund 

Expenses & Fed. Tax 

Semi-annual Div 

Cash on hand 



$10,390 

! 

571 

10,020 

50,045 



513.;.i;0 
55.570 



The following condensed report of the various societies shows the in- 
crease and decrease from July 1, 1S75, to Jan 1, 15717 : 

Savings and Loan. 

F. W. BOER President. 

CYRUS W. Carmany Cashier. 

Increase. Decrease. 
OpenDeptAccounts. 50 

Deposits 51.221,57" 

Loan, 1,344,347 

Gross Earnings 34,486 

Resen . Fund 

Expenses & Fed Tax $2,718 

Semi-annual Div ... . 5,018 

Cash on hand 354,017 



Semi-annual Div 
Casb on hand 



12,-145 



1,359 



Savings TJnion. 

JAMBS De FRBMERY President 

luv; :i,l White Cashier 



Odd Fellows' 

A lot am Blocr President. 

Jambs BENSON Cashier. 

Increase. Decrease. 
OpenDeptAccounts. ........ 87 

8 725,278 

Loans 1,293,798 

Gross Earnings $2,980 

KeserveFund 110,339 

Expenses & Fed. Tax $3,126 

Semi-annual Div 2,549 

Cash on hand 355,440 

Farmers' and Mechanics'. 

Hiixitv DUTTOK President. 

G. 51. Condbb Cashier. 

Inerti 
OpenDeptAccounts. 49 

Deposits 

Loans 

i Iross Earnings 

Reserve Fund 15,054 

Expenses 4: Fed. Tax 229 

Semi-annual Div 

i hand 5,553 



-07,510 
91,544 
12,194 



4,431 



. German. 

L. Gottig President 

Qeorqe Lette Cashier 

Increase. Decrease. 

Open Dept Accounts. 257 

Deposits 5105,234 

Loans 04,21s 



151 



Gross Earnings 20,493 

Reserve Fund 4,500 

Expenses & Fed. Tax 4.155 

iiiual Div 15,089 

Cash on hand 154,783 

Pioneer. 
Thomas Gray 

II. Kc-FAHL 

Increast . 

Open Dept Accounts. 777 

Deposits 

Loans 40,109 

Gross Earnings 432 

15 - ■"', e filial 

Expenses tv. Fed. Tax 

Semi-annual Div 

Cash on hand 1: 

Masonic 

\Vm. H. Culver 

II. T. Graves 

Increase. 
Open Dept Accounts. 481 

Deposits 

Loans 

i Iross Earnings -- 2,429 

Reserve Fund 16,826 

Expenses A: Fed. Tax 1,738 
Semi-annual Div ... . 5,1 . 2 

Cash on hand 9 1,729 

HumDoldt. 
A. C. Weber 

A. HalU.MA.N 

Increase. 

Open Dept Accounts. 100 

Deposits §34,859 

Loans 

Gross larnine-s 5.420 

Reserve Fund 10.952 

Expenses & Fed. Tax 4,551 

S mi-annual Div — 2,574 

Cash on hand 00,219 

Security. 



President 

. -Cashier. 
Decrease. 



I Increase. Decrease. 

Open Dept Accounts 10 

Deposits 



Loans . 

Gross Earnings 

Reserve Fund 

Expenses St Fed. Tax 

Semi-annual Div 

Cash on hand 



15,009 
410 



51.4,1 

President, 
. .Cashier. 

290.741 



President. 
. . 1 ashier. 
Decrease. 



3,203 

10.S11 

California. 

David Farqbharbon President. 

1). K. Chisholm Cashier. 

Increase. Decrease. 

OpenDeptAccounts. 139 

Deposits $1,535 

Loans 1.007 

Gross Earnings 2,351 

1 . jerve Fund 

Expenses & Fed. Tax 237 

Semi-annual Div 1,900 

Cash on hand 04 

"Western. 

S. Sciireirer President. 

H. JUtthkws Cashier. 

Increase. Decrease. 

Open Dept Accounts 92 

Deposits 55.1.574 

Loans 

Gross Earnings . .-'. 

Rest rve Fund 

Expenses* led Tax 2.SS6 

Semi-annual Div 

Cash on hand 



$16,594 

4,186 
17,110 

6,888 

2,140 



JOHS PaBROTT . 

W. S. Jones .. . 



. President. 
. . . Cashier. 



Aggregated, wehave the following/state- 
ment : 

Increase. Decrease. 

OpenDeptAccounts. 075 

Deposits $2,872,945 

Loans 4,229,095 

Gross Earnings $31,539 

Reserve Fund 23,500 

Expenses & Fed. Tax 15.513 

Semi-annual Div 28,065 

Cash on hand 1,225,383 



The "Journal de Paris" tells a very droll story of an interrupted 
marriage ceremony in a village near Metz. It appears that the bride- 
groom had announced his age as 3G yeara, but on having to produce a cer- 
tificate of birth before the Maire of tlae place, he was found to be six years 
older. This so exasperated the young bride that when her turn came to 
pronounce her consent to the union, she said " No," very distinctly. The 
bridegroom, amid the excitement of the assembled guests, entreated her 
to pardon this subterfuge, which lie laid to his ardent passion for the 
bride. The guests, afraid of losing the opportunity of a genial feast at the 
cost of the bridegroom, also endeavored to persuade the bride to say Yes. 
but to no avail. Greatly offenddd at having her dignity lowered, and 
being slighted in this manner, the bride would not give way. and the 
to their great regret, had to depart from the scene disappointed. 
The same afternoon, however, the bride, having had time for reflection, 
let herself be persuaded to grant pardon to the bridegroom for slighting 
her by hi- fai s ... statement, ami, arm in arm, they went to the magistrate 
again, by whom they were then united in the bonds of matrimony. 



OP PLEASURE. 

Thus often, in the course 



THE PRICE 

Upon the valley's lap 

The liberal nooning throws Of Life's few fleeting years, 
A thousand drops of dew, A single pleasure costs 

To wake a single rose. The soul a thousand tears. 



Cameron, the Scotch explorer, has made for himself a bright name in 
the record of African history. It looks very much as if lie had located 
the head-waters of the great Congo in Lake 'Tanganyika, on whose hanks 
Livingstone lived so many years. He fount! a large river flowing south- 
westward out of the lake, and traced it towards the West l 'oast, through 
another great lake, but was compelled by hostile tribes to abandon it be- 
isolutely establishing* its identity as the tremendous equatorial river. 
The best of it is that lie propo-,.s to go back ami complete his geography. 
It is odd, by the way, that many of Livingstone's reports and refen aces 
are plan,- I erroneous by his younger and more thorough successors — Stan- 
ley, Gordon and Cameron. 



Jan 29. 



POSTS< RIPT TO THE SAN III VN< IS< SEWS LETTER- 



MONETARY AFFAIRS 
Our Savings and Loan Society Banks 

i'h made 1 1 1 • ' 

n Uie following brief mmui 
month*, anil the 

in tin- interior n| t!.. I 

iin. Tliu 

■ ■ 
■ ■ 

■■■.'■■ ........ 

im what rvductd. In the city tin ■ deposit* 

1,146,755 i ■ I ■ i number "t" do- 

■ to the 
! I J75, and 

nimtry institutions there o ■ 
. hand in com 

I .in stands to tin- credit "f savings 

; ^ in any other portion "i the Dni The Bret aav- 

iik in t'alifori L859, showing that in leaa than 

iwth of the savings banks has been Bteady. Few 

tnunity may be 
»of thia character. The moi 
..f the working class may be regarded as furnishing the besl 
the s\ tndin and condition of all others, 

Uaneous local xratinue in demand, with bnt limited of 

ft-ri ti ^ R " b res of Spring Vallej Waterat92, 

and sales ol Gaslight stock 1 246 snares at 95( 96; 300 shi 

■oldal 

last the California National Gold Banks (nine 
in number) in the aggregate stood as follows : Resources Loans, etc., 
vV_'"7., 12 : BomU to secure circulation, ! ; lue from bank* 

M : Coin ami N'otes. $1,0£U25 ; Le«al Tenders, 5129,908; other 
apital paid in, $4,700,000; surplus, $585,- 
v.- — outstanding, $1,509,850 : due banks, etc., $157,- 
. 52,984,474. 

«nt for short loans. 

Overland shipments of Treasure, by express, for the week ending Jan- 

, Ban and $153,302 08 Sold Coin— 

total, - Customs absorbed, $109,292, against $152,352 last 

ship* '. from Victoria January 24th, brought 

nre to \\ ells, Fargo & t !o. : steamship City •>/ Tokio, from 

Yokohama January 24th, brought $1,000 Treasur ■. 

Gold Coin overland, by express, since January 1st, 
n as follows : 

January 1st to January 6th $305,500 

January 6th to January i:uh bT.0,000 

ttuary 20th 941,767 

January 20th to January 27th 153,302 

Total $1,160,569 

Same period, 1875 : 421,012 

The official exports of Treasure from January 1st to date have been as 

follows : 

Jan. 1 to .Tan. 27— Overland to New York $1,684,215 20 

Jan. 4— Per I itv of Peking -To i Jhina 226,797 97 

Jan. 15— Per Montana- To Germany $6,201 01 

To ( lentral America 3,000 00 

0,201 01 

Jan. 18— Per Oceanic—To China 147,645 05 

Total since January 1, 1876. $2,067,859 23 

Corresponding period, 1875 1,711,882 35 

Increase this year $355,976 88 

The above table does not include the amounts of Treasure sent through 

the United States mails. 
The duties paid at the Custom House in this city, from January 10th 

to date, have heen as folllows : 

January 19th $18,389 07 

January 20th 31,053 22 

January 21st 26,925 01 

January 22-1 5,538 69 

January 24th 18,152 60 

Previ usly in January 345,386 90 

In January. 8454. < «7-S 71 

Corresponding period, 1875 453,413 03 

Increase this year SI, 265 OS 

Money appears to be getting easier clay by day, and the recent decision 
of Hon. Judge Sawyer, of the United States Circuit Court, confirming as 
leg<*l all the late operations of the Syndicate respecting the Bank of Cali- 
fornia, and its legal right to levy assessments, has greatly tended to allay 
excitement and increase confidence as to the permanence and stability of 
the Bank. 

Pacific whalemen have made an interesting scientific discovery this 
season. A few years ago they reached the whaling grounds in August, 
only to be obliged to leave them in September. This year they remained 
until October, and might have remained longer, so far as peril from the 
ice pack was concerned. They went within eighty miles of the mouth of 
McKenzie ri7er, where sailing vessels have never been before, and say 
that a steamer, aided by the c rrents, uiigkt have gone through to Baffin s 
Bay with' 'iii, difficulty, and thus solved the mystery of the Northwest pas- 
sage. They are unable to account for this strange atmospheric change. 



JIMMY MGINN. 
Jimmy McGinn, it"- no wonder ire frown, 

.' iiiimv Mot Jinn; 
I mean t-> pull up all the dead you put down, 

t tab. hone ; Jimmy Bdol linn; 
I don't think. hVi fair 
\\ h them -;if<- t hi 

j on should repair 
To where they're tucked In; 

back 
With your I I your fa 

i >ch bona ! J immy EtfoQi 

m ci I Inn, n tm'f you hold off j 
< tab hone ! Jimmy Mel Jinn? 
Th re'fl my mother-in-law, rest her soul, Cm afraid, 
( tali hone ! J [cl rinn; 

Should 

■ ■■ 
1 bar ii r - th 
And to Stockton go in. 

Let her turn up b n 
'Till old Gabriel blows, 
Och hone] Jimmy McGinn. 

Norn Mister McGinn, do you think it's quite fair, 

I i'li hone : Jimmy McGinn, 
To !'•■ crowding the hyena out of hi* share? 

I tan I ■ ! - 1 i amy Mel rinn. 

Suit there's George Francis Train, 
And A isemblyman Laine, 
To resurrect bhem again 

Should they die, were a sin. 

And the Spring Valley crowd, — 
t)li ! it cant be aUov< ed, 
Och hone ! Jimmy McGinn, 

Then take my advice, darling Jimmy McGinn, 

t tab hour ! Jimmy McGinn, 
An<\ after the wake don't y u wake them again. 
Och hone ! Jimmy McGinn. 

With your sins on your head 
Could you rest in your bed 
If you knew that the dead 
Would be troubled again? 

So why not let them lay 
'Till the real Judgment Day, 
Och hone ! Jimmy McGinn ? 



ARE THEY QUACKS? 

" When parients comee 'o T, 

I physics, bleeds and sweats 'em ; 
Then, If they choose to die. 

What's that to I— I let's 'em."— 1. Lettsom, 1770. 

Gentlemen, You Call Yourselves Doctors. Have You a Diploma? 



Allen, H.R., 

Anderson, R. C„ 408 3d and 7593$ Mib'ii. 

Avechiga, Vincent, Green above K'rny. 

Burr. Agnes, 181 0'Fnrrell. 

Baron idis, ft. W.. 618 Green. 

tBartielt. Mrs. A. W. M., 29 O'Farrell, 

"I',i.,m ii, caul, 614 Kearny. 

Cowan, Rohert H., 207 Kearny. 

Clawson, J. W. C., gone to Arizona. 

Cliapnum, C. B , Si[ Montgomery. 

C'ROOKETt, M. J. .821 Market. 

Crcrtis, Alvah. Oakland. 

Cobh, A. J., 7th Btreet-, Oakland. 

Cornell, Jason L, 426 Kearny. 

Chamberlain, B. A., 709 Mission. 

Eviius, T. W.. 473 71b st, 0;ikland. 

Eaton, E, B. 

Evorv. A. F.. pat't nostrums, 608 M : ket. 

Flattkrt, Jonathan, Govt House, 
Washington and Sunsome. 

Fish, L. \V., Ulli Stockton. 

Gottschalk, Mary, (!15 Larkm. 

Hen dee, M. J., Mission and Third. 

Hobbs, — , LosAnneles. 

Hill, A. B., 137 Montgomery. 

Hill, R. B., on the wing. 

Holwis, Friedrich, N.E. Polk & Jackson. 

Joscelvn, W. Robert, 118 Post. 

Joscelyn, Aidrich, 1 IS Post. 

Johnsuii, P. T., 104 Kearny. 

Krocholm, . 

Koon, J. M., Grayson, Cal. 

Lanszueert, Louis. 40b Fourth. 

Maxwell, , 114 Geary. 

Miliken, A. Redwood City. 

Mayer. II. E., " French " nostrum ped- 
dler, 7 Geary. 

McBrido.J, J., etc.. 534 Market. 

Moore, S., 31 Second. 



tMoore, D. C..N.E. Post & Kearny. 

tMoore, Ellen, South San Francisco. 

Preshaw, R. G.. on the wing. 

Preshaw, Mrs. s. ft., on the wing. 

Piquet. E.,cor. Wash'n and Brenham PI. 

Pratt, P., with "King of Pain." 

Percy, l> , on the wjng. 

Rtjtlet, J. H., nostrum peddler, 745 
Mission and 40S Kearny. 

Rowc, J. L.,220 Third. 

RabiigHatl, N., 819 Montgomery. 

Reed, Ambrose M., B'rtway &32d. O'kd. 

Renken, Henry, 9th &B'd\vay, Oakland. 

Rider, free!, 504 Bush. 

Steele. Emma, 50G Third. 

Sturman, Benj.. M'.l Howard. 

tSmith, Barlow J., G'45 California. 

Sucktzer, , traveling about. 

Spinney, A. B., 11 Keitrny. 

Steiuhiirt, P-, 426 Kearny. 

Simmons, alias Carl, 777 Market. 

Tlrlemon, , 405 Kearny. 

Thomsen, N. L., 74 Fonnb. 

Trask, Edw., Nucleus Hotel. 

fTrueedell, A. P., on the wins. 

*Van Den Bergh, J. P. P., Mission be- 
low Third. 

Van Den Bergh, Albert. 

Vandenbergh, L. C, 7H> Montgomery. 

Wood, Wm. H., 61 Second. 

Walkek, Maky K., 110 Sixth. 

Woods, J. II., Lick House. 

White, Elijah, 17 Third. 

Wehher, R., 328 Kearny. 

Wolff, Mux, graduate Sing Sing Prison 
419 East. 

Yeaton, George A., alias Henry Clay 
Wilkins. Bigamist, Wat.-onville. 

Tonng, J. C, bib Sacramento. 



Miller, J. A., Ha> wards. 

*Cla:ms a diploma from the Quack Medical School of Philadelphia, that sold them. 

tClaims diplomas from the Hygeio Therapeutic Water Cure College in New York. 

For Carl Blach's " qualifications," see the WeW8 Letter of November 27th. His 
name will be removed from the above list aw soon as he has the regular diploma. 

Lemmen's "Last.—" If you aggravate me (luc) any further, we'll have 
a (hie) (lilfiuuty, and you'll find I'm not the (laic) man to take water 
either !" said an after-dinner friend to the irrepressible Lemmen, the other 
evening. "My dear fellow," responded the imperturbable L., "taking 
Wti r is the very last thing any one would accuse you of." 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 29. 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 

Crowe— In Redwood City, Janoary 2d, to the wife of James Crown, a daughter. 
King— On the mountains, January 15th, to the wife of P. King, a son. 
Thaten— In this city, January 90$, to the wife of Jacob Thaten, a daughter. 
Leverone— Iu this city, December 27th, to the wife of Win. Leverone, a son. 
Brown— In this city, January 23d, to the wife of Thomas Brown, a son. 
Feige -'n West Oakland, January 24th, to the wife of K. Feige, a son. 
Landsberger— In (his city, Jan. 84th, to the wife of J. Lansberaer, a daughter. 
Kretshmer-In this city, January 23d, to the wife of W. Krctshmer, a son. 
Hudson— In this city, January 25Ui, to the wife of D. D. Hudson, a pod. 
Aaron -In this city, January 26th, to the wife of Joseph Aaron, a son. 
Blaess-Iu this city, January Hid, to the wife of Michael Blaess, a eon. 

ALTAR. 
Saunders-Hayes-In Petalnma, January 1st, J. N. Saunders to S. M. Hayes. 
Blume-Voege— In this city, January 23d, Henry Blume to Anna \ oege. 
Sundby-Hausen— In this city, Jan. 25lh, H. J. Sundby to Raven K. Hausen. 
Melluish-Flynn— in this city. Herbert Melloieh to Jponie M. Flynn. 
Jeffers-Mason-In this city, January 24th, Milo S. Jeffura to Margie S. Mason. 
Kennedy-Rickards-In tins city, Jan. 26th, P. B. Kennedy to Anna Ru-kards. 
Henry-Carroll— In Woodland, January 25th, \V. A. Henry to S. II. Carroll. 
Horton-Jessup — In this city, January -2'ifli, Wm. S. Ilorton to Adda M. Jessup. 
Swett-Cleg-g 1 — In this city, January 27th, Edwin F. Swett to Rebecca Cleg?. 
Piratsky-Cook— In this city, January 19th, James Piratsby to Mary A. Cook. 

TOMB. 
Foster— In this city, January 24th, Sarah A. Poster, nerd 23 years. 
Joseph. -In this city, January 25th, Simon Joseph, a^ed 23 years. 
Pnrdy— In this city, January 26th, John II. Purdy, aged 72 years. 
Jacobsen— In this city, January H5th, Dora H. Jucohsen, aged 52 years 
Ellis— in this city,- January 24th, prevet Lieutenant-Colonel Henry A. Ellis. 
Mcllwaine— In this city, Januarv 2Hu, Sophia M. J. Mcllwaiue, aged 2 years. 
McLaughlin— In this city, January 25th, Annie .McLaughlin, aged 24 years. 
Finn— I" tuie city. Januarv 26th, Clarinda Finn, aged 36 years. 
King -In this city, January 26th. Ellen G. King, aged 6 years. 
Bainbridge— In'this, citv, January 26th, Lydia C. Bainbridge, a«ed S years. 
Pearce-In this city, January 26th, Mury J. Pearco, aged 30 years. 



FOREIGN DOTTINGS. 

Senor Castelar has been elected Deputy to the Cortes from Barce- 
lona.— -It is now certain that British India and the French Colonies will 
join the Postal Union. Notifications of the adhesions of Brazil has been 
received.— —Grambetta and other French Republicans, apprehensive of a 
bad effect in the Provinces if the Radicals should not succeed in electing 
all their Senators for Paris, are strenuously working to bring about a com- 
promise.— —Spanish diplomatic representatives of the various courts have 
verbally informed the Government that after the defeat of the Carlists 
Spain hopes to be enabled to quell the Cuban insurrection through in- 
creased reinforcements. — —Hipwolite Dussard, the French statesman, is 
dead.' '■-■Dispatches received in London announce the death of the Carlist 
General Ello.— The International Postal Congress at Berne has agreed 
to admit British India and the French ( lolonies into the Postal Union.^— 
A Vienna telegram reports that General Kauffman will take command of 
Southern Russia and Caucasus in the spring-. —The Emperor of Austria, 
on the 28th instant, forrrially approves the appointment of Monseigneur 
Kutchler to be Archbishop of Vienna.— —The steamship State of Nevada, 
which arrived from Antwerp from New York, and the British steamer 
Polios, came in collision Monday. The State of Nevada had her rudder 
twisted, rudder post bent and propeller frame broken.^— The Austrian 
Foreign Office recently intimated to Mr. Orth. American Minister, its de- 
sire to have a copy of Secretary Fish's note to Minister Clashing. The 
American Government declines to allow a copy to be given.— A die- 
patch from Rome reports that Garibaldi presided Tuesday at a meeting of 
survivors of the country's battles. His suggestion for the formation of an 
association of these survivors, with branches throughout Italy, was unani- 
mously adopted. He was enthusiastically greeted by many Englishmen 
and Americans who were present at the meeting. — =-The new Interna- 
tional Railway station at Boulogne, France, was burned on Wednesday. 
——The Canadian Government is to be informed that the lull creating a 
Supreme Court of the Dominion, which debars appeal t<> the Privy Coun- 
cil of England, must be repealed.— The Times' Constantinople corre- 
spondent writes that he has been positively assured that the Sultan owns 
£8,000,000 in the Turkish debt, and that he has exacted full payment of 
his dividends, refusing the half coupon paid other creditors.^— The Lon- 
don Echo says intelligence was received yesterday from Colonel Guidon, 
dated at Duffie, stating that he was safe and well. The surgeon of the 
expedition had died, and Colonel Gordon was the only white man remain- 
ing. —Prince Bismarck is better, and hopes to take part in the debate 
on the Penal Code in the Reichstag on Thursday. «=The Alfonsists have 
begun simultaneous attacks on all the Carlist positions in Alvia, Biscay 
and Guipuzcoa, and severe fighting is going on. ^" Cardinal Antonelliis 
really ill, but not sufficiently so to occasion uneasiness. The Pope, al- 
though much enfeebled, has not discontinued his receptions.— The Lon- 
don Times has letters from Constantinople which give details of great suf- 
fering of Armenian Christians from the cruelty of Turkish rulers and the 
unrestrained rapine of the Koords.— The total number of Deputies 
elected to the Spanish Cortes is 408. Of these 30 are supporters of Sa- 
gasta, 10 Clerical, 1 Cantonalist and 304 Ministerialists. Castelar is the 
Only moderate Republican elected. The Ministerial majority is too large to 
be beneficial. — - A communication has been sent by the Porte to the several 
Powers, threatening that the Turks will immediately occupy Montenegro, 
if her Government does not cense giving aid to the rebels. The Montene- 
grin official journal announces that the Porte is determined to declare 
war and annihilate Montenegro.— A Hungarian national bank is to be 
established.— The project of Prince Bismarck for buying up the Ger- 
man railways meets with widespread opposition. ■ ■ ■ The erection in the 
Vatican library of a monument to Garcia Moreno, the late President of 
the Republic of Ecuador, is proposed.-— =—Major Cole, the American 
Evangelist in England, who has be in holding very successful revival meet- 
ings in Newcastle, is now in Sunderland.«^=A commercial crisis threat- 
ens in Odessa and Moscow, Russia. The joint stock banks are embar- 
rassed, and are ne otiijing to contract a joint loan in foreign parts.— In 
connection with tne question of the disestablishment of tin: English 
Church, it has been shown that eighty-four per cent of the members of the 



House of Commons belong to that church.— The English Government 
has appointed a commission to visit the manufacturing centers an 1 to as- 
certain the effect of foreign tariffs, and especially of the tariff of the 
United States, upon the trade in those places.— The subjects of Queen 
Victoria, exiusive of those in the British islands, number 203,000,000. * >t" 
these there are upward of 5,000,000 in America, nearly 2,500,000 in Aus- 
tralia, etc, nearly 2,000,000 in Africa, about 176,000 in Europe, and in 
Asia nearly 193,000,000.— The British Army and Navy Gazette hasstrong 
reasons for believing that the latest news from China is not of a reassur- 
ing character, but that the attitude and actions of the people are of a war- 
like character. 

LOCAL DOTTINGS. 

The Sacramento river was nineteen feet above low water mark Wed- 
nesday, having risen two feet and five inchesin twenty -four hours. There 

were several violations of the law prohibiting the firing of crackerd and 
Chinese bombs in Chinatown on Chinese New Years. -Thirty-nine car- 
loads of fat beeves have just arrived from Oregon and points along the 

Central Pacific Railroad north of Sacramento. Silver eels frolic in the 

Sacramento city water, and slip through the faucets in the dwellings of 

the inhabitants of that interior village. Owing to the heavy fall of 

rain on Sunday, the dedication of the Seventh Day Adventist < 'hurcfa on 

Laguna street was postponed. A grand bal masque will be given by 

the Scandinavian Dramatic Society, " Norden," at Union Hall, Saturday 

evening, February 12th. William Denahy, a lad of eleven years of 

age, was to-day committed to the Industrial School, his father failing to 

control him. The missing boat of the abandoned Nicaraguan ship 

Liguria was picked up by an Italian bark, and the men were landed at 

Parhelion de Pica previous to December 18th. The rainfall up to 8 

o'clock Wednesday, according to Tenneut's rain gauge, amounted to 
16 16-100th inches, 15-100ths of an inch having fallen timing the twenty- 
four hours then ending. A row on board the ship Tidal Wave this 

forenoon resulted in the arrest of Thomas Graham for assult and battery. 

A piece of the San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad, between 

Lakeville and Petaluma, was washed away during" the storm on Sunday, 

detaining the down train about an hour. .Southern Pacific Railroad 

trains were delayed about three and a half hours Wednesday through the 
washing away of about forty feet of the road between Mayfield and 
Mountain view. . The schooner Mary Beil claims to have made the 

Sassage from San Francisco to Donahue during the gale on Sunday in one 
our and twenty minutes, and to Petaluma in three hours, the entire dis- 
tance forty-two, miles, Thomas B-ielly was found on a car track, near 

the lower end of Market street, Thursday, and an attempt to remove him 
showed that he was drunk and had seriously injured his spine in falling. 

He was carried to the Prison Hospital. Jacques Oppenheiiner was 

convicted of assault and battery. The row was all about a coat. In 

this city triplets were bom to the wife of Edward Coon, and Wednesday 
the happy father congratulated his wife by an advertisement published 

in the German papers. Adolph Weiner, a German, thirty years of age, 

employed in a drug store on Davis street, was found dead in his room at 
the Swiss Hotel, Commercial street, under circumstances which led to the 

conclusion that he committed suicide. Fears are entertained for the 

safety of the schooner Urania, how twenty-six days out from Kodiac, 
Alaska, making her overdue here. The schooner is in command of Cap- 
tain Thomas K. Lee, who is accompanied by his wife and family and a 
son of D. Shipser, the owner of the vessel. Ten days is the average time 

consumed in the voyage. Mr. J. W. Pfluger, a prominent resident of 

Hawaii, was serenaded by his friends at the Palace Hotel the other even- 
ing. Judge Adams, late Jmlue of the Second Judicial District, has re- 
moved to this city and resumed the practice of law. 

The Rev. Dr. "Wm. A. Scott, D. D., will preach, Sunday, at the 
usual hours of morning and evening service, in St. John's Presbyterian 
< 'lunch. Post street, between Mason and Taylor. The public cordially 
invited to attend. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP C0KPANY, 

For Japau asid China, leavp wharf, corner First ami Bran- 
nan streets, al nu.ni, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting ;it Yo- 
kohama with Steamers fur Shanghai 

BELGIC February 16th and May 16th. 

GAELIC March 16th and June 16th. 

OCEANIC April 17th and July 17th- 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 3 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger .\-vnt. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Jan. 22. 

FOR ARIZONA AND MEXICAN PORTS. 

For Tape .St. CinraiM, BEjixutlan.Jbn Pax- GuaytiiaN n» <C the <vi«r;irin 
River, touching at Magdalena Bay, should tmfllcieni Inducement offer— The 

Steamship Captain, will leave for Hie ahove port? OD 

at \i u.'elock M., from Kolsom-Ftreet Wharf, connecting 

at the Mouth of the Colorado with tin' Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
st^-uii Navigation Company for nil points on the River. Through Hills or 1 Lading 
will be lurnislied and none others Signed. Freight will he received on Monday, 
27th instant No freight received for Mexican Porte atter Fri'lay noon, and Bills or 
LadlnK for those ports must he accompanied by Custom-house and Consular 
Clearances, For freight or passage apply to 
Marc h 8, B. M. HA KTSHOKNE. 010 Front street. 

A. T. ELLIOTT, 

Ship ami Grain Broker, 21-i California street, San Fran* 
cisco. Hops a Specialty. Jan. 22. 

H. H. MOORE. 

Dealer in Books for libraries. ---A large assortment of fine 
and rare books just received, and for sale at 009 Montgomery street, near Mer- 
chant, San Francisco. Oct. 24. 

NOTtCE. 

For tlie very best photographs go to Bradley A- Bnlofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 

PCHATTS' COLLECTION! 

At fSousctvorth's Gallery, XO. !> Mooutgniery street. —Xew 
Paintings .' Open Daily. Admission Free. Dec. 11. 



Jan POSTSCRIPT TO THE 8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 7 

NEW ILLUSTRATED VIEW" OF SAN FRANCISCO, 1876. 

NOW PUBLISHING. 






Nkv- etjteh 



GKR^-ZPZHzma chart 

Of tbo City and Couuty ol . >•.,. Interests op California, and tub Paoipk '-'>>■ c, Containing 

. ! otcls, bunks, churches, Insurance offices, and every institution of use and Interest, In 

thort every feature which ■ den to the world at large of the amazing progress ol tbis our Queen < ily of the Pacific Coast, is 

ill, wltb a maixlnal list of note? and references, appropriately numbered, on the same sheet, and in fact, a neat and comprehensive plan 

e «>i tii*- Char! 34x38 Inchi -. \ few »»r the principal places plctoriully presented are here named, as follows : 



I Burlin *iw i- 

■ 
■ 

ii ii.i 



ifl*. w 

t W h:\rf 

. 

M 



i 

». Lacuna Puercfl 

lolli ii- ■ 





toad 

udClifl House 

S . Mounts a Lak< 

erj . . 

| emeten 

■ I, i. iarol BUI. ox Lone Mountain Cem'ty 

Calvary I enit'ti ■-. R I*.) 

.Vh*rf I Mount iin 

h*rl buili KM! ' . .- ■ mitj ' He- 

brow Cera 

S3. Noyai Shaloine (Home of Peace Ho- 



< I hoi tho Natlvltg 139. Brooklyn Hotel. 



■■ ■ k 

2V. India Dock 



into and 

■■ ■■-.■;■ 

Z\. O.ikl ind I 



■ 






brcn < '.'iiii'i.Tv .. 

■ ■ of St John 

Dolores, lniilt A.D. 

I77c, R, C 

66. Chur ill ■■ Jo* ph 

i.;. Rnianuel I hurota. German 

in i liureh, 



... .. I. ' hiiroh nl St. [mn 



io A Mex S 

r I.iltnli' r l ' ..'-. H 

i.il 



M ■ i . ■ ■ . , 



Howard Presbyterian N. S . . 

1. Howard-al I M. E. Chnron 

_'. i Ihnroh of tho Advent 

'3. Mariners' c ihurcb 

J, First Unitarian Church (Starr King's) 
".. Cburoh of St Mark 

li. I alvary Pn ibj I -I'iiin I liurell, 

ofrue i.iii.um-i;i 

8. Synagogue Oliabai Shatome 

'-.>. Trinity Church ,.,. 

10. I inn rli of Si . .J;tini?s 

11, Second ( lonfrregationa) Church 



Iiip ( 'o.'s Docks 



I I S. Receiving Shin 

■ ■: 

i. 1 ig Bridgw 

.-. Mission Bay 



3*. Point San Quentin 

ti ■ Bolting Mills 

Works 

. 

ft Hunter's Point and Dry Dock ffT. Powell-street M. B. Church 

View Race Track B8. Afrioan M/E. < Ihuroli 

II. Point Sail ltruno s'i. i Ireen- street < 'oiiLTeuutional Church. 

ciou Vallej !Xi. Church of St. Francis (R. C.) .-... 

JM. San Bruno Road !tl. Lnrkin-streetPrCsbvterian Ch. O. S.. 

i~. San Jose Road 92. Church of St. Bridget (K. O.) 



83, First Congregational I larch. , 

81, Chnrcb of St. Mary (R. O.).... 

si, (firs! Presbyterian I 'liurch 

BB, First Baptist ( Ihnroh., 



Ilii. Turnoi - Hall 

I II. Bank Of ' alilornia 

142 

143. 0. I*. Hall .. .. 

! ii. Mechanics' Institute. , 
< Bnter .Market,. 



. . streut M, I .' i hurcb 

!■',. Ladies' Protective and RelEol Society, 

Iffi m ... pi ■!. Hayes Valley] 

97. Orphan Asylum (Protostunt > 

!'-. Wrmduard's (..mleuS 

8 '. i titj Gardens 

100. ii .inn Woolen MilN 1-ti;. I, nan uml Deposit Building . 

mi. t'a.'iii,- Wn-.K'n.imi Knitting Mills.... 147, Novndn Block 

102, s. F.i P. Sugar Refinery 1 1\ Real Estate Association Building. 

m:i. (al. Sii-:.;: !:■ ii .. r. Ii'-. Pacific Bights 

101. New Cm Hull and Law Courts 150, Paoific I tcean 

in-".. i'i ( s.fiian' 161. News Letter Office 

lull. Masmiie 'IVniplf 1S2, Mint 

in . Merchants' Exchange 193. Hood Building 

106. Portsmouth Square i Plaza > 151. Army Headquarters 

109. Bay Sugar Refinery 1W. County Hospital 

lilt. i'i b i„m Hmi-r ami Post Office I .Mi. 11:. II i.f K.-e.mls ; 

III. Telograph Hill 157. Wells Fargo 

ir.\ Wa^iiiu'-'tci;. s.(n;i!-i' 158. Califorhin Theater 

II::. ( ■nrn.'ii;. Si-., r . I 'lis, .ntation 1'i'L Imprnvvd llr.lcr of Red Men 

III. Tulun-l Medi'-al 1'nll,.-.. \m, Y. \l. C. Association 

Ii:.. St. M.ry'st'olk--.- i It. C.i llil. Union Hall 

lit;. Holv Brothers' College 1K2, L'irst Rc^iincnt Armory 

1IT. Union t .I'.iiiiniiir Sol I 163, .Mayor Oils' Reside OOC 

Us. Nor i 1 1 Cosmopolitan School Hi). Fire Alarm Station 

ltd. Kroadwav Sdiooi Hi.-). Magdalen Asylum 

rju. Spritik' Vall.-y School.... Ifiti. California Pioneers 

121. Denman I Bush-street) School HiT. U. S. i !ourt Buildings 

122. Washington Grammar School 168, St. Luke's Hospital 

123. Eighth-street Sol 1 169. R.C. Orphan Asylum 

124. Powell-Street School 170, San .Jose Railroad Depot 

125. High School 171. Golden Gate Park 

I'Jii Lincoln Grammar School 1?:. Turkish IJaths 

127. Mission-street School 173, Butch ertown 

128. linlusl rial School of California 174. Now Marino Hospital 

129. Alms House 175. Agricultural Park & R. O 

130. Palace Hotel 176. Harbor V iew 

131. Grand Hotel 177. Steamer City of Peking 

1 2. Lick House 178. W. C. Ralston's Residence 

133. Occidental Hotel 179. Mr. Pearl's Residence 

131. Cosmopolitan Hotel 180. Gov. L. Stanford's Residence 

135. RuSE House 181. Gas Co.'s Works 

1: I!. St. Francis Hotel, corner of Clay and 182. D. Porter's House 

Dupont streets, location of first 18' 

house built in S. F., 1w3j 184. R. O. Rogers' House 

137. Sailors' Home 185. S. F. Frear Stone Company 

i:K Abbotford Hotel 



THe GJ-i-apliic OliHi't 

is be printed on superior thick drawing-parjerj an* 1 with ink of the first quality. The engraving was done by the well-known house of Britton & Rey 
Lithographers, and the linear drawing nndm Ite superinteiidtT.ee cf L. K. Townscnd, architect, and surveyor of this city. 

The Price of the Chart is only Twenty-five Cents, 
and it can be dispatched to any pait of the United States and Europe for Two Cents. 



ENGLISH SHIPBUILDING. 

The returns of vessels built on the Clyde during the past year 
again show a decrease of tonnage as compared with the previous year. 
I hiring 1S75, there were launched from the various shipbuilding yards (in- 
bluding from Rutherglen to Greenock) a total of 210 vessels, having a gross 
t . n i n;i .■■• of 212,416. Of these there were 77 sailing vessels, with an aggre- 
gate tonnage of 86,831 : 9 paddle steamers, tonnage 4,599; 102 screw 
Steamers , tenure 117.102 ; and 2S smaller vessels, tonnage 3,884. Ascom- 
pared with the previous year; tBe returns show an increase of 29 in the 
Dumber <>f vessels, but a decrease in the tonnage of 32,051. In the class 
of sailing vessels there is an increase of 30 in number as compared with 
the previous year, nml also an inn-ease in tonnage to the amount of. 32,- 
§00 tons. In paddle steamers there is an increase of one in number as 
compared with last year, but a decrease in the tonnage of 7,180, show- 
ing that the paddle steamers built on the Clyde during 1875 have on the 
e been of much -smaller tonnage than those built during the pre- 
ceding year. Tn screw steamers there is a decrease of 11 in number, and 
also a decrease in tonnage to the amount of 57.624 tons. In the class 
of smaller vessels there is an increase of 11 in number, and a decrease in 
tonnage of 47. 

THE GOSPEL IN A NUTSHELL. 
Editor News Letter: — Dear Sir.— As time is money, and as many 
people have but little of either to spare in this driving, practical age, and 
be every effort is made to abbreviate, abridge, condense, and compress the 
greatest possible quantity in the smallest possible space, it was resolved at 
a conference of the clergy, which was held in your city last Sunday, that 
in unlet- to obviate the necessity of listening to long-winded sermons, of 
jrhich the people have become very weary, to offer a prize for the best 
treatise on theology. This was to be a poem, not to exceed sixteen lines, 
and to cover the whole question of salvation. I am happy to state that 
out of 700 competitors your correspondent carried off the prize, which was 
a magnificent painting of ths drowning of Pharaoh's host in the Red Sea. 



The artist's conception of the situation is sublime. A shoreless sea of 
burning red, casting an angry glare on a leaden sky. Not a vestige of 
anything else in sight, Pharoah's warriors having gone down. The con- 
noisseur studying the picture is to suppose them still struggling beneath 
the waves. At the request of the conference I send you the poem that 
won the prize: 

Heaven is the home of an orthodox ring, 

Where a divine enigma reigns as king, 

Where whitewashed souls from this mundane shore 

Shall sing hallelujah forever more. 

H'll is a boiling brimstone pit, 

Where poor, damned souls forever sit. 

And burn, and bake, and roast, and fry, 

And are gnawed by worms that never die. 

Mankind may avoid that fiery flood 

By bathing within the Nazarene's blood; 

They can find it where tickets for heaven are sold, 

Then walk over hell on a bridge of gold. 

No atheist, infidel, pagan, or Jew 

Shall ever acquire the precious boon; 

None but an orthodox rose water few 

Shall dance with the angels in heaven's saloon. 

Yours respectfully, The Parson. 

The Oaks, January, 1S76. 



Detroit husbands and wives sometimes— once in a great many years 
— have disputes. The other day when a Beech street couple were holding 
an angry argument the husband raised his hands and exclaimed, " O Con- 
Bistency, thou art a jewel !" The wife at once broke down, and as she 
sobbed she gasped out, " You saw her at the opera, I suppose, but if she 
had to split wood, wash dishes, and' take jare of six children she wouldn't 
look any better'n I do— hoo !" — Detroit Free Press. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 29. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Kecorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for the 
Week ending January 27, 1876. 

Compiled from tJie Records of the Mercantile Af/encn of John McKillop tfc Co., 

317 California Street, San .Francisco. 

Friday, January 21st 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



John Gallagher to Louis Lang 

John Kingston to Wm Scholle 

L B Robinson to J Pennvcook, Jr. 
W F Toothaker to T McFadden... 
Henry Marshall to Rich'd Dogget . 

John'3 Hill to M E Church 

M J McDermott to Pat'k Delaney . 

B J Shav to Dennis O'Leary 

W H English to L H Van Staden. . 

Jas Sullivan to Mary O'Brien 

WmHollis to Eugene Moffet 

Same to Max Wolff. 

Same to Edw Gilnerts 

Same to J Knowlton, Jr 

Same to Chus E Broad 

Same to Beuj T Lacy 



DESCRIPTION. 



N Jessie, 100 w 1st, -2:3x60 

N O'Farrell, 220 c Gough, 27:6x120 ... 

Lot 6, blk P.RBH'd 

X Ellis, 102:6 e Scott, 29:11x137:6 

W Jessie, 85 s lSth, 25x80 

Lot 1-1, blk 12, Paul Tract H'd 

Ne 5tb .iv, 2117:11 se Harrison. 22:11x7.' 

W Chattanooga, 27 s 21st, 26x75 

E Taylor, 92 o Sac'to, 23x80 

Franklin and Bay, 60x137:6 

[S Post, 165 e Octavid, 55x137:6 

! S Post, 110 eOctavia. 27:6x137:6 

JN O'Farrell, 264 w Steiner, 25:6x82:6 . 
[N O'Farrell, 176 w Steiner, 23x82:G .„ 

X O'Farrell. 10s w Sleiuer, 22x02:6... 
|X O'Farrell, 220 w Steiner, 22x32:6... 



PRICE 



£2.290 
3.100 

350 
1,550 

900 

1 

1,200 

900 
5,000 

500 
12,500 
8,500" 
4.U4-1 
3.958 
3.750 
3.830 



Saturday, January 22d. 



W J Gnmi to Mary Hurley 

Wm Hollis to Cbas Stiiro 

Win Hale to Jo? Gosling 

L G Harvey to Annie Barker ... 
Mas CeoVly Ass'n to W B Carr. . 



H L Nelson to same 

L Radovich to Ella Chielovicb . 
Wm Hollis to Jacob W Davis.. 
E L Sullivan to Edw Foum 



Nw Arlington. 25 ne Miguel, 25x100 

EMonlg'y, 70:6 s Pino, 44x67:6 

Se O'Farrell and Lagnna, 50x137:6 

Lot 15. blk 041, Point Lobos H'd 

Lots 12, 14. 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, and 2 fl 

of 28 in pec 26; also, lots 11, 13, 15,17. 

19, 81, 23, 25, and 2 l'eet of 27, sect 27, 

Masonic Cemetery 

Sw Old San Jose R'd and 25th, 300x275; 

also, se 24th and Guerrero, 114x300... 
X Jackson, 212:7 W V Ness, 25x117:10!^ 

S Post. 55 u Octavia, 27:6x110 

S Sullivan, 626:0>^ w Cole, w 124:7, s 

SO. n45 deg, 22 min, etc 



* 240 

5 

400 

350 



350 

2,500 

i.ooo 



Monday, January £4th. 



Wm Hollis to MKavanash 

Jas S Port eons to Win M Fletcher 
Wm M Fletcher to John II Doolcy 

Clias Lux to same 

Same to same 

M S Bates to Harrison Barto 

P s Mullen to Mary E Hagar 

F E Luty to Jas Ambrose.... ' 

B Nathan io II M Heineman 

Marv R D»lv to Thos W Brennan . 
C H Reynolds to H F W Hoffman . 



C Murphy to Jas Walsh 

John Hinke 1 . to Alex Bigger.., 



W Appleby to Wm Hollis... 



Mary Mitchel to O Menesini . 

S F Sinclair to same 

CB WyatttoB J Shay 



S 21st, 325 e Guerrero. 25x114 

Ne Tyler and Pierce, 25x100 

Ne Tyler and Pierce, 65x100 

Lot 7, blk 45, Excelsior H'd 

Lor 8, blk 15, same 

E Ellen, 175 s 25th, 50x125 

SB'dway, 45:10 eGou?h, 82:11x102:6.... 

W Sanchez. 114 s 21«t, 57x105 

S Bush, 192:0 e Gough, 42:3x120 

Se Waslfn and Polk, 187:6x137: 

Lots 9, 20, 29,40, 50, 50, 67, 75. 87, ol' the 
Snooke Ranch 

X Glover, 220:6 w Jones. 23x00 

N Cal'a ave, at se cor of Precita Vallev 
lot No 1C0. w 25, u 100. etc 

S H M B 66, h'd by 21si, Valencia, Mis- 
sion, and on n by a line parallel with 
21st, and 269 n from it 

N Teleg'h pi, 154:8V eDupont,17:2Mx46 

Same 

N Pine, 137:6 w Pierce, w 137:0x137:0, 
re-record 



si ,200 

3,000 

7,000 

5 

5 

350 

5,000 

500 

6,500 

1 

- 1 

2,000 



6,000 

2,000 

10 



Tuesday, January 25th. 



T L Com'rs to Win Wailiwright. 
Fairmonnt Land Ass'n to same . 
Jacob Xibbe to Henry Tetzcu... 
Wm Lane Booker to S Holler ... 

JSAlemanytoJ Framke 

P II Canavan to Wm B Swain... 
Geo F Sharp to Wm P Dangerfield 
Wm P Danserfield to J W Grace. 

J W Grace to Mary Grace 

N Landry to Pierre F Priquet 

Wm Hollis to Cbas S Ives 

F Formhals to P L Goedecke . . 

I T Milliken to Thos Doyle 

Wm T Patterson to J Sahdstrom. 

Geo B Adair to W H Smith 

Thos B Valentine lo J F Swift ... 

J L Field to John Cassidy 

F E Wisgiu to Eliza LWing 

Mich'l McDonnell to J McDonald 



Swfith, loose Bryant, 50x85 

Lot 157, blk 3. Fairmonnt 

N Pine, 200 w Larkin, 100x137:6 

Sw Turk andSevmour av, 30x75 

S Pi Lobos av, 90 e Colons, 25x125 

Ne Cal'a and 2d av, n 187:6, etc 

N Fulton, 137:6 w Broderick, 68:9x187:6 

iSame 

Same 

S Dale, 275eDolores, 50x114 

E Guerren., 120 s 2lst, 25x100 

U:id He Bryant, 140 n 26th. 80x200 

IS 25th, 127:3 e Church, 25x114 

Nw Minna, 460 sw 4i h, 22x80 

I Lot 20, blk 610, Pt Lobos Av H'd 

IW Valencia. 280 n 20th, w 195, etc 

iSe Pt Lobos av and 22d av. 20:8x100 

Se Howard and Hubbard, 70:6x84 

! E cor Harrison and 1st, 71:0x69 



495 
5 

1,900 

705 

5 

5 

2,650 

Gilt 

200 

1,250 

2.50G 

400 

3.900 

350 

250 
Gift 

18.000 



Wednesday, Jr nuary 26th- 



Marg't Doyle to Mich'l Doyle . 



Olive J Clark to John Grady 

Abraham Levy to Pat'k F Nolan . 



John Mahon to JobnMartell 

A W Bowman to Amanda Arnot .. 

John Archbald to T C Jansen 

Benj F Sterelt to F Henry 

G Goodman to Rich'd Tobin 

Rich'd Tobin to FrancisU Druffel, 

Frank Caffry to Thos Donnellv |N Eli/.'th, 220 e Grove. 51x114 ... 



N Bonita, 134:0 w Polk, w 25, n 77:ll? a , 
lie 29:3':,, etc 

S Bush, 200:3 w Octavia, 31:6x137:6 

X Tyler, 139:6 w Steiner, 37:6x137:6. sub 
to mortgage lor si. 875 

EZoe, 97:6 s Bryant. 20x75. 

X Pine, 137:0 e S'an Ness, 63x137:6 

Se Natoma, 500 sw 7th, 2 r -x75 

Nw Howard, 200 sw 1st, 25x85 



Sw Clay and Hyde, 60x80. . 
Same. 



Same to same 

John O'Brien to P N Hanna 

Market St H'd As'n to 11 Baroilhet 
Jas Walsh to Solomon Peneton ... 

Henry Hinkel to Cesar Dor 

Market St H As to F Hufschmidt. . 
E Chielovich to Greek Church 



S and L Soc'y to Sam'l Agnew 

Cbas W Pope to Cbas A Kiinkner. 

Henry Marshall to Marg't Friel 

P H Kraucr to E V Utter 



Lot 12, blk 25, Fairmojint Tract 

Lot 16, blk 532, Buy View H'd 

W Belcher. 100 H 14th, 50x625 

N Glover, 229:6 w Jones, 23x60 

S McAllister, 114:6 w Webster, 23x137:6. 

X 14th, 114:6 w Webster, 23x137:6 

S Turk, 407 w Parker ave, w 40:4, s 41 

deg, w 201:6, etc 

W Dolores, 114 s Dale, 25x114 

S Vallejo, 183:6 W Jones, 20x60 

W Jessie, 210 8 18th, 2:.xS0 

Und !£ 8 acres Woodbury Tract 



$ 650 

3,400 

4,-100 
2,750 

10-000 

l.srn 

6.500 

104 

1 

1,000 

900 

300 

2.540 

2.000 

2,668 

1,290 

3,043 

450 

2,500 

900 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOR WEEK ENDING JAN. 



'Andes 

Advance 

Amazon 

Alps. 

Alpha 

American Flag 

Alta 

American Flat 

Belcher 

Best & Uelchcr 

'Belmont 

Baltimore 
' Buckeye 
Bullion 
'Cherry Creek 
Crown Point .. 

Challenge 

Chollar 

Comet 

Con. Virginia. 

California 

Caledonia 

Gusmo poli tan 

Coso Con. 

Confidence 

Condor. 

Cabinet , 

Dayton*. 

Defiance 

Empire Mill 

Lur^kaCon 

Exchequer 

Eldorado South 

Ificlipsi 

Edinburgh 

Europi 

East Ophir 

Globe 
Gould & l-'orry 
Glencoe Con .. 
Gold Run 
Gila 

Golden Chariot 
Glasgow 

"Hale &Noreross 
Husaey 

Imperial 
International 
Ida Elmore.. 
Jackson 

Justice 

Jefferson 

Julia 

Jenny Glynn... 

Knickerbocker 
Ken tuck 
K. K. Con 
Kossuth 
Kelsey 
*Lady Bryan 
Leopard 

Leo 

•Lady Wasb.'n . 
Leviathan — 
Mexican 
Monumental — 

Meadow Vallev. 
Mide: 
Miller 

Mint ... 
Mansfield 
Marks & Darrow 
New York 

Nevada 
*Xortb Carson 

Niagara 

"New Co..o 

Northern Belle 

Newark 

Ophir 

Overman 
Original Gold Hill 
Occidental 
Pioneer . , . 
*Piocbe. , . 
Prospect . . 
Pacific .... 

* Poorman 
Phil Sheridan . . . 
Prussian 
Panther . . 
Rye Patch 

ftock Island 

Raymond & Ely 
Seg. Caledonia . . 
South California 

Savage 

Sierra Nevada. . . 

Seg. Belcher 

Silver Hill 
South Silver Hill 

Succor 

South Chariot. . . 
Safe Deposit 

* Union Con. 

Utah 

*WoodvilIe 

West Comstock 

Wells Fargo 

West Belcher... 
Yellow Jacket. . 

The Stocks above marked thus * are Assessed.. 




rhe Special and Authorized Organ of the ^rlal Steam Navigation Co. --Fred. Marriott. Patentee 

Price p«r Copy. l"> l.iit-. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1-..6. 



Annual Subscription lln gold , t7J*>. 







(Califot'tttn 



waut. 



DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 26. 



SAN FBANOISOO, SATtTED^Y, TEB. 5, 1876. 



No. 2. 



OfHre* of the Nnn Ininrlsro Nous Letter, i'nllTorula China 
M ni. California Mall llax. South bide Merchant street, No. 007 
to 615, San Francisco. 

C10LD BABS— £90(5:900 -Silveu Babs— 8(5 12 I' cent. disc Treasury 
* Notes are selling at @ Mexican Dollars, 5@7 ^ cent. disc. 

Trade Dollars, 3J<3MJ per cent discount. 



per ceut for Gold ; Currency, 12+ 
On London! Bankers, 49@49J: Commercial, 42$ 



*** Exchange on New York, \(<i 
)»-r oenti pram, On London, 

. : Pare, 5 francs per dollar on New York. Telegrams, i 
pel cent. _____ 

4_T Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 4, at 3 p.m., 113. Latest 
price of Sterling, $4 8S@$4 89J. 

aw" Trice of Money here, \(3jl\ per cent, per month— bank rate. In the 
open market, 1<§ U. Demand active. 



FINANCE. 
Abundance oi Coin for all purposes, even for stocks, is the rule. 
Large amounts are offered without finding ready takers; rates are mod- 
erate where the security is good. Considerable money has been invested 
in Bonds, with demand for more ; Gas and Water meet with few sales, 
whilst Bank and Insurance stocks are neglected. The lessons of the Panic 
bring its fruits near. People refuse to invest in incorporate companies, 
unless they have an insight, and as this, for various reasons, is not feasible, 
they prefer investments such as Bonds, where no inside is needed. Our 
last issue foreshadowed a decline in Silver ; our predictions have come to 
pass ; for the good of our mercantile community it is to be hoped that it 
will recede more ; then goods will be sold either on a Gold or Silver basis, 
whereas our merchandise sold for gold are in a great measure paid for in 
Silver, and the loss, in the shape of heavy discount, has to be borne by our 
merchants. Let them combine, give their customers the choice, and regu- 
late their prices accordingly. To-day bankers will meet to hear the re- 
report of their Committee on Clearing House matters. We have no doubt 
that before long we will have it in full operation, therebydoing away with 
an unnecessary amount of of labor, and hence a great saving in time. We 
think this Centennial year will be a prosperous one for our city and 
State. The outlook was never better ; our crop prospects are all that can 
be wished ; our manufacturing establishments are flourishing ; our min- 
ing interests, silver as well as gold mines, promise to yield larger returns 
than ever ; trade and commerce will flourish iu consequence of general 
prosperity, and we predict that 1876 will hereafter be called one of the 
best, if not the best, year that California ever saw. 



Latest from the Merchants' Exchange. — New York, February 4, 
1875.— Gold opened at 112i ; 11 A. M., at 112?; 3 P.M., 112|. United 
States Bonds— Five-twenties of 1867, 121£ ; 1881, 117§. Sterling Ex- 
change, S4 80@S4 S9.V, short. Pacific Mail, 34f. Wheat, SI 40@S1 50. 
Pork, — .' Cotton, — . Hides, dry, 20{5»20i ; green, — Oil — Sperm, 
81 60(3),?1 62 ; Winter Bleached, SI 80@,?1 00. Whale, 65@70; Winder 
Bleached, 70(^80. Wool— Spring, fine, 25@35 ; Burry, 15@20 ; Pulled, 
37@ 45 ; Fall Clips, 20@25 ; Burry, 18(522. London, Feb. 4. —Liverpool 
Wheat Market, 10s.(S 10s. 3d. , Club. 10s. 5d.(gl0s. 10d. United States 
Bonds, ex-coupon, 105|. Consols, 94 7-16. 

San Franciscoites Abroad. — Paris : Mr. and Mrs. David Bixler, F. T. 
Cronise, Mrs. F. A. Hassey, F. R. Hassey, Mrs. E. C. Hickey, F. Living- 
ston, Mrs. F. Livingston, Miss Flora Livingstone, Mrs. Atkins Massey, 
Miss Maggie V. Massey, Mrs. Hall McAllister, Mrs. Kate Moore, Mrs. 
Fannie Osbourne, Miss Bell Osbourne, B. P. Rankin, Mrs. B. P. Rankin, 
C. E. Rankin, Mrs. Ulrich, Emile Ulrich. London : A. M. Hough,, W. 
H. Locke, Mrs. Longley, Miss Longley, Miss Powell Naples : Mrs. 
Brown,— American Kegtsier, January 1st. 



We are pleased to learn that Spencer C. Browne, son of our old and 
valued friend, the late J. Ross Browne, has joined the firm of Vernon, 
Tobin & Co., commission stock brokers, No. 330 California street. Mr. 
Browne is deservedly one of the most popular and highly respected young 
men of Alameda county. The firm, consisting of Major-General Geo. R. 
Vernon, who has a seat in the Pacific Exchange Board ; J. J. Tobin, the 
well-known and popular orator, and Spencer C. Browne, is a strong one. 
We predict for these gentlemen a successful future. 



Mr. F. Algrnr, Jfo. 9 Clements Lane. London, In aattiorlzeil to 

receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc, (or this paper. 



Published with this week 9 8 issue an Eight - 
Pane Postscript. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS "WITH NOTES. 



The Bremerhaven crime has brought to light several records of sim- 
ilar attempted crimes, but one of the most singular stories is told by the 
Mecklenbargitche Anzeiger, as follows : " In the Spring of 1645 the Swed- 
ish fleet lay in the harbor of Wismar. The Master-General of the Ord- 
nance, Karl Gustav Wransel, was to make the passage to Sweden on 
board the Lion, and Admiral Blame on board the Dragon. Somebody 
wished to send off two chests— one by each of the two vessels. When 
the chests were shipped— the one to be sent in the Admiral's shin stood 
already near the powder magazine — a noise was heard in the chest as 
from clockwork. It was opened, and a mechanism in the shape of clock- 
work was found connected with a fire-steel and a flint-stone, and beneath 
them powder, pitch, sulphur, etc. The shipper of the chests, a certain 
Hans Krevet of Barth, pretended to have received the chests from three 
citizens of Lubeck, and was reported to have been won over by a Danish 
factor at Lubeck. He was executed on the 5th of July.'* 



The lifeboats of the National Lifeboat Institution of London have 
been instrumental in saving 725 lives during the past year, in addition to 
preserving 29 vessels from destruction. In the same period the Lifeboat 
Institution granted rewards for saving 185 lives by fishing and other boats, 
making a grand total of 920 lives saved last year mainly through its instru- 
mentality. Altogether, since its formation, the Society has contributed 
to the saving of 23,786 shipwrecked persons, for which services it has 
granted 959 gold and silver medals, besides pecuniary rewards to the 
amount of 47,170.. Notwithstanding the peril and expose incurred by 
the gallant crews last year, only one life was lost from the 252 lifeboats of 
the Society, although about 11,000 were out in them on all occasions dur- 
ing the twelve months. 

The Pacific Mail Company's Australian and New Zealand 

Mail Service seems to be in a very complicated and critical position. Th^ 
steamer .Colima is reported to have broken one shaft and cracked another 
on the run from here to Auckland. The steamer City of Melhourne had to 
be chartered by the authorities there to bring on the mails, receiving some 
£18,000 for the round trip. The steamer Vasco de Gama does not [so far 
as we know) receive any of the subsidy, not having run according to the 
terms of the charter. The same may be said of the other steamers of the 
line having run to Auckland and afterwards to Sydney, instead of the 
latter port, via Kandavu (Fiji Islands.) The P. M. Co. subsidy is £90,000 
(about $450,000), for thirteen round trips a year. 

Temple & "Workman, of Los Angeles, have assets of 82,263,000, 
against liabilities of $1,176,000 ; assets over liabilities of §1,087,000. Their 
breathing has been difficult of late, but still we hope and believe that as 
their strength is in land which must improve, that their lungs and chest 
are sound. From all reasonable appearances we have pleasure in indors- 
ing the general belief. 

Mrs. S- C. Hastings, wife of Judge Hastings, died at Pau, France, 
January 3d, of abscess on the lungs. Our readers will remember that Mrs. 
Hastings went to Europe in November last for her health, and it is with 
the keenest regret and sorrow that her many friends learn the tidings of 
her ineffectual struggle with her terrible affliction. 

An Italian expedition to Africa is to be dispatched at the end of 
this month. The expedition will be under the direction of the Marquis 
Antivari, and proposes to pass through the kingdom of Shoa and the 
country of the Gallas to the basin of the Victoria Nyanza. 

For London. — The British bark Prince Rupert has been cleared for 
London by Falkner, Bell & Co., carrying for cargo— borax, 69.675 Bis.; 
flour, 3,800 qr. sks. ; syrup, 80,000 galls. ; tallow, 82,686 lbs. The whole 
valued at §38,397 20. 

Benjamin Franklin's original printing press is to be shown at the 
Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition by the side of a Hoe lightning cylin- 
der press of the latest construction. " , 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1876. 



THE NEWS LETTER IN PARLIAMENT. 

The News Letter, known wherever the English language is read, re- 
cently found its way into the Parliament of New South Wales (Australia), 
and was the cause of a somewhat lively breeze therein. Hezekiah H. Hall, 
the late too notorious agent of the B»citic Mail Company's line at Sydney, 
received in these columns some time ago a very necessary exposure. This 
met with such approval where he is best known that our article, or at 
least as much of it as could be got in, now stands upon the records of Par- 
liament, as will appear from the following report slightly condensed from 
the Sydney Morning Herald of December 3, 1875 : 

'•Mr. J. S. Smith moved the adjournment of the House in order to 
draw attention to the unsatisfactory nature of the replies given by the 
Postmaster General in regard to Mr. Hall and the Pacific Mail service. 
Why did not the Vasco de Gama leave in terms of contract ? The contract 
was specific, and it was a most extraordinary thing if this vessel could take 
mails by a route different to that laid down in the contract. If this 
steamer had gone by a route different to the one authorized, the whole 
contract was annulled, and the Government should throw the respons- 
ibility on those who had broken the terms of the contract. Any contract 
in which Mr. H. H. Hall was concerned was open to suspicion, and it 
was known that that person had been appointed a representative under 
the present contract. It was a most extraordinary thing that the 
Cvphrenes did not leave under contract. It appeared that an overpayment 
of £3,279 9s. Id. had been made to Mr. Hall. What did that overpay- 
ment mean ? It had been made by the late Government of which Mr. 
Parkes was chief. It seemed extraordinary that any government should 
be so foolish as to advance money for services that had never been per- 
formed ; it was a matter of very grave suspicion. The penalty due for the 
nonperformance of the contract was £50,000. The whole thing meant 
that the country was swindled out of £53,279 9s. Id., and this was a mat- 
ter which the House should inquire into. He thought the whole thing 
was in a very bad state, and that the connection of Hall with the contract 
was such as to cause a feeling throughout the country that the mail ser- 
vice would not be a substantial one. He believed that the people looked 
upon this man as an out and out swindler, and upon everything with 
which he was concerned as a swindle, and upon everybody who was asso- 
ciated with him as swindlers also. He observed that many San Francisco 
papers had written about him, and an individual he was associated with, as 
a pair of swindlers, and that individual was the Hon. member for East Syd- 
ney, Mr. Parkes. 

Mr. Piddington rose to order. The Hon. member had spoken of another 
Hon. member as a swindler, and he hoped the speaker would interfere. 

Mr. Speaker. — The Hon member is aware of the rule that it is im- 
proper to make offensive allusions to any other member, 

Mr. Smith said he did not wish to make an attack upon the member for 
East Sydney, but to read from a paper in which that Hon. member's 
name was brought into prominence. With regard to Hall he was looked 
upon everywhere as a swindler. 

Mr. Smith then proceeded to read an article from the San Francisco 
News Letter and California Advertiser. 

Mr. Speaker asked the Hon. member if this paragraph was the same 
that he had ruled could not be read on a former occasion because it con- 
tained offensive allusions to an Hon. member of that House. 

Mit. Smith.— I am merely reading a paragraph that is altogether in con- 
nection with Hall. 

The paragraph which he went on to read was headed ' A Rascal Coming 
to the Surface Again,' and the greater part of it had reference to H. H. 
Hall, who was described as 'the financial fillibuster of Sydney, so well 
know in this port, and in New Zealand and Australia for his utter reck- 
lessness and want of character,' and to whom a number of dishonest 
actions were explicitly attributed. The latter part of the paragraph read 
thus : ' Scores more of rascalities might be told had we the necessary time, 
space and inclination to deal with the subject. We can understand that 
the Pacific Mail Company may easily be deceived by certain high flown 
documents this man Hall carries about with him, and which were 
obtained for him by Mr. Parkes, late a Cabinet official in Sydney. Once 
in his life Mr. Hall had the good fortune to have Mr. Parkes in his em- 
ploy, and ever since, to use Hall's own words, he has ' had Mr. Parkes 
under his thumb.' In course of time Parkes was appointed to office, and 
he and Hall entered into what was generally believed to be a corrupt bar- 
gain to get an English company to run the service to San Francisco. For 
this purpose it was necessary for Hall to visit London, and it was equally 
requisite that his ally, Parkes, should fortify him with all the certificates 
of character he could obtain.' 

Mr. Farnell rose to order. The Hon. member was certainly not in order 
now, in connecting the name of the Hon. member for East Sydney with 
the matter. 

Mr. Smith. — I am merely reading a paragraph. I do not see that it neces- 
sarily effects the Hon. member for East Sydney. It may be that no Hon. 
member is alluded to. [Mr. Farnell. — You have mentioned his name.] 
There are more people named Parkes than the Hon. member for East Syd- 
ney. 

Mr. Speaker. — I think there can be no doubt that an Hon. member of 
this House is alluded to, because that article speaks of Mr. Parkes as a 
late Cabinet Minister. As I before stated, it is improper for any Hon. 
member to make offensive remarks in regard to another, or to read any 
passage in which offensive allusions are made. 

Mr. Smith. — Well, I will withdraw the name from my reading. 

The Speaker. — The Hon. member cannot do that and continue the im- 
plication. 

Mr. Smith. — Well, I will leave Parkes out of the question altogether. 
I have got him in as far as I care about having him. I won't refer any 
further to the ally. I will go on a few lines lower down : ' The press of 
this city, of New Zealand, and Australia have often shown up this man.' 
[That is Hall not Parkes.] 'When they hear that he is likely to turn up 
again in this connection their exhibits of his rascalities will certainly be 
renewed. We have wished the Pacific Mail Company success in this en- 
terprise, but they are certainly taking many steps that are likely to lead 
to disaster. The appointment of Hall is not the least of them. The 
papers of this city have continued to speak of him as a swiadling operator.' 
Colonial papers have spoken of him in hardly less approbrious terms. 
Mr. Smith said he was given to understood that Hall had used the name 
of the late Premier extensively in America, and it was to his mind extra- 



orninary that the Americans had been gulled by him. The majority of the 
people of that colony looked upon the contract made by the late Govern- 
ment with Mr. Hall with very great suspicion, and many persons believed 
Mr. Hall was not the only person who would benefit by the contract — 
that the coffers of some members of the late Government would benefit by 
it. 

_ Mr. Burns, *he Postmaster General, regretted that his former explana- 
tions had not been satisfactory to the Hon. member. It must be remem- 
bered that the New Zealand Government were equally interested in this 
contract, and he expected to hear their views in a few days. He believed 
that Mr. Hall had annulled the contract, and the law officers were now 
considering that matter. Mr. Hall had been appointed agent, but it was 
not for him to discuss that individual's antecedents, or the propriety of 
his appointment by the Mail Company. There were many matters pending 
between that colony and New Zealand, but until he arrived at a fuller un- 
derstanding with that colony he did not think it wise to enter into a fuller 
explanation. He was disposed to think the service would turn out to be 
a good one, but he was not inclined to allow the contractors any conces- 
sions. 

After some further discussion, of no particular moment, the motion to 
adjourn was formally negatived, and the House proceeded to other busi- 
ness/] 

SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporated in Geneva, Switzerland, January 24th. 1873. 
Head Office, in Geneva. Capital, 82,000,000. subscribed. 51,000,000 paid 
up. President, HENRY HENTSCH. San Francisco Branch, successors to Messrs. 
Hentsch & Berton, 527 Clay street. Directors : FRANCIS BERTUN and ROBERT 
WATT. 

This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit bn Europe, and to transact every 
kind of Banking, Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Se- 
curities in Europa. Deposits received. 

Bills of Exchange on New York, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool, PariB, 
Lyi'iiri, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Oioron, Brussels, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort, Geneva, 
Lausanne, Chaux-de-Fonds, Neuchatel, Fribourg, Bern, Aarn, Soleure, Baden, Basle, 
Zurich, Winterthur, Shaffhausen, St. Gallen, Lucern, Chur, Bellinzona, Locarno, Lu- 
gano, Mendrisio, Genoa, Turin, Milan, Florence, Rome. 

An Assay Office is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores 
and sulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the optionof the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. Dust and bullion tan be forwarded from any 
part of the country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 
I September 18.1 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, 8AN F2ANCKC0. 
1>. O. THILLS President. | TBOS. BROWX Cashier. 

Agents : 

In New York, Agency of the Bank of Calfornia, No. 12 Pine street ; in Boston, 
Tremont National Bank ; in Chicago, Union National Bank ; iu St. Louis, Boatman's 
Saving Bank; in London, China, Japan and India, the Oriental Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the 
United States, Europe, India, China, Japan and Australia Draw direct on London, 
Dublin, Paris, St. Petersburgh, Amsterdam, Antweip, Hamburg, Bremen, Berlin, 
Leipsic, Vienna, Frankiort-on-the-Main, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Got- 
eborg, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, New Zealand, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama. Sept. 26. 

BANE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
Incorporated by Royal Charter.— Southeast corner or Cal- 



-Loudon. Branches — Portland, Or- 



JL ifornia and Sansome streets. Head Office— 
egon ; Victoria and Cariboo. British Columbia. 

Agents :— New York, Bank of Montreal; Chicago, Bank of Montreal; Canada, 
Bank of Montreal ; Mexico and South America, London Lank of Mexico and South 
America ; Ireland. Bank of Ireland ; Scotland, British Linen Company ; England, 
National Provincial Bank of England ; England, North and South Wales Banks ; En- 
gland, Bank of Liverpool. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Deposits received on current ac- 
count subject to check, or on deposit. Exchange sold on London and all the princi- 
pal cities and towns of Ireland and Scotland from el upward ; also < >n New York and 
all principal places in Canada. Commercial Credits granted available in Europe, 
China, Japan, South America, Australia and New Zealand. Approved Bills discounted 
and advances made on good collateral security'. 

Nov. 13. WM. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

THE NEVADA BANE, OF SIN FEANCISO. 
Paid TJp Capital $5,000,000, in Gold. 

Louis McLjiik 1 President. [ J. C. Flood.. Tlce -President. 

N. K. Masten Cashier. 

Tristees : — J. C. Flood, J. W. Maekay, W. S. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, Louis McLane. 

Cor resi'on dents :— London— Smith, Payne & Smiths. Hamburg— Hessy. Newman 
& Co. New York— Eugene Kelly & Co. Chicago— Merchants' National Bank. Bos- 
ton — Second National Bank. New Orleans— State National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. Oct. 9. 

THE FIEST NATIONAL GOLD BANK 0? SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid np Capital $2,000,000, Gold. President, George F. 
Hooper; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, K. C. Woolwortli ; Assistant 
Cashier, George W. Rodman. 

CoRREsrcp.NDESTs — London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neumaii A: Co. Paris: Hotthigner & Co. New York; National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deiiosit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rate of Exchange. Dec. 13. 

PIONEER LAND AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, BAflK OF SAVINGS 
AND D^POSiT. 

Southeast corner California and Montgomery streets. Safe 
Deposit Block. Incorporated 1869. Guarantee Fund, $2i>0,000. Ninety-first 
dividend payable on January 5th. ordinary deposits receive 9 per cent. Term 
deposits receive 12 per cent. Fhis incorporation is in its seventh year, and refers 
to over 3.500 depositors for its successful and economical management 

H. KOFAHL, Cashier. 
Tuos. Gray, President ; J. C. DrxcAS, Secretary. March 27. 



411 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bush street, above Kearny, Cw. Mahe, Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities at current rates of 



Feb, ■">. 1876.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



THE LONG AGO 
Oh! a wondarful rtnun i- tin- ri\.r I 
(trough the n 

With .» ' thm wit a m-iMi\»l rlivm.'. 
An. I . ■ -nl'lilile, 

Vn-1 Mlprti with tl • in of \ian». 

!i m Um vlnton %n drifting, l i 1< * - Ralra "i mow, 

And Um nuumon Uk* bud* batmen, 
And tli.' v.-.ir in the ihonf w they come Hid they .,•■> 
On t ti it, witli its ebb end Bow, 

Ai it gUdee through Um Bhndov and sheen. 
There' iala np the river Time, 

Where the lufteet of tin are playing : 
i oloudleee sky ind ;i tropica) olimo, 
And ;» eons u tweet u ;» vesper chime, 

And thi- Junes with the roaee are staying. 

And the name of this isle li the Long Ago, 

And we bury oui re 

There an brows of beauty and bosoms of snow — 
There are heape of dust, but we loved them so : 

There an* trinkets, and tressoe of hair. 

Then are fragments of songs that nobody sings, 

And ■ pari of an infants prayer; 
Then ■'.- a tuts unswept, and harp without strings ; 
There are broken tows, and pieces of rings, 

And the garments that sh* used to wear. 

There an hands that an waved whan the fairy shore 

By the mirage is lifted in air. 
And we sometimes hear, through the turbulent roar, 
Sweet voices we heard in the days gone before, 

When the wind down the river is fair. 

Oh ! remembered for aye be the blessed isle, 

All the -lay of life", till night - 
When the evening comes, with its beautiful smile, 

.Vml .Mir eyes are closing to slumber awhile. 

May that "Greenwood" of soul be in sight. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS 
Englishman. — There are no buffalo on this side of the bay 



xcept at 
you fix it for 



Woodwards ' rardens. 
OscAfi LEWIS.- -Yoo put nutmeg on it, of course. Juste 

1. _-- n. 

Heyxkman. — No, we don't know where to get a complete set of 
burglar's tools. 

GeoboB li. We can't explain why there is no Baumgartner Whisky 
in the city, unless How long have you been here ? 

LlCE HOUSE — To stop your canary making a noise, give it to the cat. 

LUCKT 15. — 1. The white bull clog wins, of course. 2. No, it is not fair 
to tight chickens on a slippery center-table. 

HiuHWAVMAN.— You are quite right ; there is a strong public sentiment 
excusing the shooting of policemen. 

MOLLIS. — Don't really know whether smoking a cigarette would leave a 
bud taste in your mouth, hut are willing to try and see. 

De. Maky A. Walker.— If they really bag at the knees send them 
back, of course. Why didn't you go to Bullock & Jones? 

BUBTIO. -Don't know who " Toady Sullivan" is. Will take a week off 
and find out, 

Bald Head. — Oil of vitriol will make it a?! come out. Sorry we can't 
help you, but if you will get a small boy to stand behind your chair with 
a tack-hammer, you will have the dead wood on the fleas, and things, as 
matters are. 

Bob Jones. — Of course we can answer your question. It will take just 
as long for a hen to hatch a china egg- as it will for you to say something 
funny. Go and read a comic almanac for a few years. 

SOUTH Pakk. — Eugene D y, of course. All the men, even, admit that. 

Four Biter. — The Jury Brothers ought to pay the dentist, and send 
the steak itself to the Centennial. 

Wash List.— We suppose the laundryman under the Russ House must 
keep a shirt store in another part of the city. There is no other inference. 

Byron. — The only vacancy on our paper that would suit you intimately 
concerns the daily removal of the superincumbent dust from editorial 
contiguity. 

Smith. — Always wear a red tie, with a velvet vest and two chains, if 
you do not wish to be thought eccentric. 

Mel' k. — Will be back again in about six weeks. Cheer up. 

Fourth Floor, — By all means Leland should have seats put on the roof 
of the Palace. Go up there once with young Leland, and it will probably 
be done. 

Private Box. — To be sure. Only too glad ! Mum's the word ! Yum — 
yum — yum ! 

B — Y — nt. — Comly's is the regular thing for beginners. Don't think 
much of night-schools. 

F — dl — d — r. — Popper is a good chiropodist. Why will you crowd them 
into number fourteen's then? 

Alice H. — The front name of "that uneasy little wretch " is "Poca- 
hontas." 

Harry Edwards. — Thanks. Did you ever go through the Bohemian 
upholstery for specimens ? Try it. 

Blue Eyes.— It's no use. We are all in love with Ellie Wilton down 
here. 

Mr. Lick. — Shakspeare wrote some very good stuff indeed, but you are 
mistaken in supposing- he was ever on the News Letter. He has a monu- 
ment already, somewhere, we believe. 

Fool Killer. — -We cannot believe your malicious statement that Sen- 
ator Laine recklessly imperils human life by "standing on the front of 
ferry boats with his ears elevated, thereby obstructing the pilot's view of 
his course." In fact we know that, by special agreement with the ferry 
company, he invariably folds them down and allows them to trail in the 
water at the stern of the boat. 

McShane. — No, we don't want your portrait to add to our gallery of 
"Men We Know." 

Rustic. — The fare on the Palace Hotel elevators is one bit ea;h way. 



I.riPON AND SAN FRANCISCO B*NK (LIMITED). 

(1 a plied, H.,.ooo.oon.,,i which M, 00 0,000 la folly paid OB M 
■ ■ | 

Lifer, J \MI H M HTK1 I 
ml m in igw. I UdlLLO M \i;i ]\ i n, m k ■ 

I National Dank. 
Tin- Bank la now preparod to truuact all kind* ol Oei 
Busman la London and Ban I i 
world 



42 



SAN FRANCISCO 8AVING8 UNION, 
T»>»> California street, corner Webb, capital mid Re- 

• ■»> -*. ■'■■■.-' 11,000 Dejxwlta, W.OIB.OOO DiBft roBi JamM di I i 

■ . Ulx rl Miller, 1 [i Preddi m ; C tdolphe Low, D J tor, • 

Baum, Charlu Pace, Washington Bartlett, v Campbell, Ben* Qeom C Potter; 

Lovell win!.', Dividend! f"t tv LDpoi oenl re- 

■pecUvsly, Mi, ordlnan and term dopoelti Dividends ire payable eml*annnally l In 

ind July, m ij loaned on real aatate and "i» united Btatea B la, or 

equlvaienl wcuj 11 October 'M. 

DIVIDEND OF THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND IOAN fOCIETT. 

Ijlortbe ball* year ending- IIUm tlnte, the Board of IMreetorn 
..f the Qerman 8avlnga and Loan Bocletj baa declared Uio dividend on Term 
Depoaltsal thorateof nine per cent per annum (0 per cent \ and on Ordinary De- 

tt-it- it the rate ol seven and one*hau per oont per annum (7) per cent.), free from 
^oderal Taxes, and payable on and after tin- lift i-nntii *i;n <<i .hnnmrv, i 
Bv order. GEORGE LETTE, Secretary. 

San Francisco, December 111, 187*., Jan. H. 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital £200,000.— Office 526 California street. 
North vide, between Montgomery and Kearny Btreete. Offloa hours, trom 9 a u 

i.» a cm. Extra hour on .S:itunUys from 7 to s i'.'m, fur receiving of Deposits only. 

Lonns lniulo on itcal Kstiite and othur collateral securities, at current rates "f Interest 

Prealdont L. GOTTIG. | Secretary GEO. LETTE. 

DIRECTORS. 

F Roedinr, H. Behmledell. Ohaa Eohler, Ed. Sruse, Dan. Meyer, Chos. Mcinccke 
George H. Eggers, P. Spreckles. Feb. l. 

WEiTERN SAVINGS AND TRUST COMPANY, 

NTTjl Corner Po<*t ami Kearny NtreetN—Divitlcnd Notice. 
* M^Jm The Board of Directors ot the Western Savings and Trust Company of San 
Francisco have declared a dividend of ten (10) per cent, per annum on term de|X>sits, 
and ciyht (8) per cent per annum on ordinary deposits, for the half year ending De- 
cember SI, ISTo, and payable ou and after the 15th of January, 187(3. 
Jan. 8. By order J. H. GRIFFITH, Secretary. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK (LIMITED). 

m y ^~p California street. San Ira nciKCO.— London Office, Z 

. -^ .-^> Anycl Court; New York Agents, J. W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

Authorized Capital Stock, $0,000,000. Will receive Dejxisits, ojien Accounts, make 
Collections, buy and sell Exchange and Bullion, loan Honey, and issue Letters of 
Credit available throughout the world. FRED. F. LOW, > „ „ „„„ 

Oct 4, ION. STKINHART, t ^W*- 

MARKET STREET BANK OF SAVINGS, 

No. ti'-i l market street, opposite Palace Hotel. Ordinary, 
Special and Term De]K>sits received. Money Loaned on acceptable security for 
30, 00 and 00 days, and for longer periods on Mortgage security. Interest allowed on 
average balances, also mi Special and Term Deposits. 

HIRAM ROSEKRANS, President ; WILLIAM J. CONOLLY, Cashier ; THOMAS B. 
LEWIS, Secretary. October 9. 

MASONIC SAVINGS AND LOAN BANK, 

6 Post street. Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Guarantee 
Capital, $150,000. Moneys received on Term and Ordinary Deposit. Dividends 
paid semi-annually. Loans made on approved security. Certificates of Deposit is- 
sued payable in New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and principal cities of the Atlantic 
States and Canadas. WM. H. CULVER, President; Francis Smith, Vice-President ; 
H. T. Graves, Secretary ; L. E. Pratt, Attorney. May 13. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $300,000. 

Officers: President, John Parrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital, £5,000,000. — Alvinza Hnynard, President : C. W, 
Kellogg", Vice-President ; H. F. Hastings, Cashier ; R. N. Van Brunt, Secretary. 
Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers on all principal Cities. Collections made and a 
general Banking business transacted. August 22. 

DELINQUENT POLL TAXE3. 

Office of the Tax Collector of the City and County of San 
Francisco, January 22, 1876. — Public notice is hereby given to all persons 
who have failed or neglected to pay the POLL TAX due for the fiscal year 187ft 76, 
that the same has become DELINQUENT, and been placed in my hands for collec- 
tion, and if not paid on or before the FIRST MONDAY OF MARCH, will become a 
lien upon their property, and be collected as provided in Section 3.SG0 of the Political 
Code. [Jan. 29. WM. FORD Tax Co lector. 

SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF S4N FRANCISCO, 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sansome Sts. 

CAPITAL 82,000.000. 

This Company is nowopen for tbercntingr of vaults and the 
transaction of all business connected with a Safe Depository. Pamphlets giving 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the Company. Hours, 
from 8a.m. to 6 p.m. September 18. 

TO THE OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE- 

Persons owning; Real Estate that has heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name are requested to appear personal or send 
their deeds to the Assessor's Office, IMMEDIATELY, and have the necessary' changes 
made for next year's roll. The work on the Real Estate Roll will commence in a few 
days, after which it will be too late for any changes. 
Jan. 22. ALEXANDER BADLAM, City and County Asses sor. 

A. T. ELLIOTT, 
U^hip and Grain Broker, 214 California street, San Fran- 

> Q cisco. Hops a Specialty. Jan. 22. 

H H. MOORE. 

Dealcr'in Books for libraries.— A large assortment of flno 
and rare books just received, and for sale at 60S) Montgomery street, near Mer- 
chant, San Francisco. Oct. 24. 

NOTICE. 

For the very best photographs go to Bradley A Bulofson's, 
in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1876. 



"MEN "WE KNOW." 

James ('. Flood. 

If we "were asked to select from among- all the men that California 
events have brought to the em-face, that one upon whose fortune pure 
chance has had the least influence, we should name the subject of this 
sketch. James 0. Flood was born at New York City about 1828, and is 
now forty-eight years of age. His education, while not of the highest 
class, such as can only be obtained in the great universities, is yet sound 
and practical in all English branches. To this knowledge of his own lan- 
guage Mr. Flood has added by a general line of reading a familiarity with 
the history and literature of the world, and a wide acquaintance with 
passing events. The effect of the gold discoveries of California in 1848-9 
was a sort of intellectual conscription in which the physical and mental 
energy of the world was drafted into the expedition to this coast. If it 
had been desired for any reason to select from the youths just arrived at 
man's estate in the spring of 1849, the finest and most energetic minds, and 
to set them aside into a special class, no Bystem of examination would 
have procured so perfect a choice as was made by natural selection in the 
struggles of the strongest to get away from home and to find their way to 
California. In this uprising of youthful ambition James C. Flood pushed 
out into the great ocean of adventure, and found himself in San Francisco 
in 1849, a passenger on the ship Elizabeth Ellen, Like most young men of 
that period, he arrived here with no capital, save his own will and natural 
forces. How he struggled in the commencement, first at one thing and 
then at another, as chance threw honeBt employment in his way. to secure 
subsistence, and, that obtained, to lay up a little capital, itis not necessary 
to give in detail, for it is substantially the history of any young man of 
that period arriving here, possessing sufficient spirit and self-reliance to do 
honest work, rather than depend in any manner upon others. His mind 
looked for results even at that early day. Whatever employment he may 
have in the beginning held, he soon threw them aside in his determination 
to work for himself in the making of his own fortune. As early as 1854 
he associated with William S. O'Brien. It was then that they began 
those mining enterprises that have already resulted in rendering them the 
first mining capitalists of this, and possibly of any, age. 

The first notable enterprise engaged in by Flood & O'Brien consisted of 
operations in the Kentuck and other mines on the Comstock, in which 
they generally contrived to secure a controlling interest. This was as 
early as 18G2. Their operations in Hale & Norcross, a few years after, 
were on a scale so large as to attract general attention to them as mining 
speculators. But the operation which finally made the name of this 
mining firm known throughout the world has been compressed within the 
short space of a few months in the early part of 1875. The existence of 
those vast bodies of ore in the Consolidated Virginia and California 
mines which gave them the name of bonanza, thus adding a permanent 
word to the English language, was suspected as early as February, 1S74, 
and were made certain by the proprietors in December of that year. 
The generosity with which they dealt with those who had the good for- 
tune to be their friends, is now generally known in this community. 
They were not content to see their own fortune growing with colossal 
strides each hour, but desired all who had been kind to them in the past 
to accompany them on the road to prosperity. Many of our wealthiest 
people of today, if we thought proper to name them, would confess that 
to trie fortunate circumstance of their good relations with Flood & O'Brien 
in years gone by, they alone attribute their being rich instead of poor. 

The establishment of the Nevada Bank is the idea of Mr. Flood, who 
has resolved that his bank shall grow up in San Francisco, sound in capital 
and with a reputation throughout the world, that shall be built upon 
genuine merit. 

In appearance, Mr. Flood is prepossessing, strong, and about 5 feet 10 
inches high, compactly built and robust form. His complexion is a 
healthy blonde, with a serious but pleasant demeanor, and a grave and 
sedate carriage, befitting' the earnest nature of the man. 

It has been remarked by thoughtful men to whom Mr. Flood has been 
known from youth, that all he is now, was foreshadowed in him from the 
first ; that whatever situation he was placed in for the moment, he was 
always equal to, and performed his part in a grave, quiet and thought- 
ful manner, marked rather by force held in reserve than by that actually 
employed. His bearing towards others was always that of the inborn, nat- 
ural gentleman, invariably courteous and gentle to all, and never failing 
to receive like consideration from those he met ; inherently confident of 
his own position, never dreaming that it could be questioned by anybody. 
And this was in no respect more marked when occupying the humblest 
position that chance has imposed upon him than now that he is one of the 
leading apitalists of the country. 

AY. 8. O'Brien. 

The jolliest millionaire in creation, is to be found in the subject of 
this sketch. And the reason is simple enough. William S. O'Brien has 
taken the world easily from the day he entered it, a little over forty 
years ago. It was at New York city, and that famous metropolis has 
done many worse things than in giving this man to California. It is 
understood that Mr. B'Brien is the social member of the firm, draws his 
dividends, and, laughing at care, waxes daily more plump and debon- 
aire. He arrived in California on the 6th day of July, 1849, in the ship 
Faralinto, around the Horn, and passed through a probation, not of 
poverty, for to a man of simple tastes and good habits in California there 
can be no such thing ; but of toil, self denial and devotion to business. 
His first business connection was with the late Ool. William 0. Hoff, one 
of our best known and most honored pioneers. The firm of Hoff & 
O'Brien continued for two years, when the subject of this sketch retired 
for the purpose of forming a co-partnership with Wm. J. Rosner, in the 
ship -chandlery line. In May, 1854, the present firm of Flood & O'Brien 
was established, and has never been dissolved. It is probably a co-part- 
nership that will be only ended by the hand of the grim monster. A 
good share of that popularity which laid the foundation of the fame 
and power of the firm was due to the genial manner and cheerful speech 
of its junior member. Everybody liked Billy O'Brien, and everybody 
put entire faith in the integrity of the firm. They were known to be 
men of capacity and sterling worth. In the mining speculations that 
have gradually ted up to the present position of the house, Mr. O'Brien 
has always been a full partner. With rather more of taste for politics 
than his partner, Mr. Flood, Mr. O'Brien has, as a rule, kept clear of all 
complications of that kind. Yet once, in 18li2, he was tempted by over 
zealous friends to stand for the position of Assemblyman. We are happy 



to say he was defeated, inasmuch as he expressed himself at the time as 
pleased with the result, and surely he ought to know better thau anybody 
else whether he wauterl to go or not. Mr. O'Brien has made a host of 
friends and relatives haHpy by the liberal manner in which he disburses 
his wealth. And what better test of the true gentleman can be found than 
that shown by the fact that he enjoys the happiness of others. Mr. O'Brien 
is — years cro and a bachelor. But not one perversely set on remaining 
without the pale of matrimony. On the contrary, we feel at liberty to 
say to the fair sex of our State, damsels and widows, that he is susceptable 
and that nothing in the world would be easier than drawing to terms and 
capturing this, one of the richest single gentleman to-day in America. 
Verbum sapsut. 

The career of Mr. O'Brien is one well worthy of study and imitation on 
the part of young men. We might say that it inculcates as plainly eb 
the life of a man can the injunction to the rising youth of the country 
to press forward, and hold to the faith that in the end energy, integrity 
of purpose and real talent will surmount all difficulties, and force position 
and a recognition from the world. 

SAMUEL McKEE & CO. 
As the public begin to appreciate and understand the system of " Puts 
and Calls" pursued by this firm, their popularity and general acceptance 
is surprising. A " Put" or " Call " is nothing more nor less than an or- 
dinary stock transaction, condensed and compressed into the briefest, 
handiest and most expeditious limits. Governed by the same rules, and 
regulated by the same quotations that obtain in the ordinary regular and 
well-known system of stock operations, the method inaugurated by this 
firm is nothing more nor less than a simplified process of stock transac- 
tions, noticeable as being without the trouble and loss of time occasioned 
by the constant handling and rehandling of the stock itself. In New 
York, where this branch of the stock business is fully understood, it is 
probably the most popular method extant, particularly for moderate 
transactions. The Messrs. McKee have introduced a good many fresh 
Eastern ideas and Wall street improvements that have already begun to 
inspire the imitation of certain of our local brokers. The new offices of 
this enterprising firm in the Safe Deposit Building arc the handsomest 
and most business-like ones we have seen for many a day. If an appa- 
rently "rushing" business is a sign of prosperity, the Messrs. McKee cer- 
tainly seem to enjoy every indication of an extensive patronage. 

Among Champagnes the Carte D'Or is fast becoming the unmistak- 
able favorite, and it embodies every claim to its position. The enterprise 
of the agents, Messrs. Locke & Montague, of 110 Battery street, has al- 
ready given it a foremost place. We notice that they have in their cellars 
champagne that is but six weeks from Fiance. Tbey have in stock also 
the Extra Drys of this favorite brand, and which is probably the best grade 
of this wine in existence. It is well known that with champagne wines 
the fresher the importation the better the connoisseur is pleased. 

PAVILION SKATING. 

General Assemblies will be held in the M eefaanles* Pavilion, 
corner Mission and Eighth streets, every Morning from 10 to 12, every Afu-r- 
frora 2 to H, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Evenings from 8 to 10. {No Assem- 
blies Sundays.) 

ADMISSION' PRICES. 

To Morning* Assemblies Free I To Evening Assemblies 50 cts 

To Afternoon Assemblies 25 eta | Tickets in packages of twelve $4 00 

Use of Skate s on all occasions 25 cts. Dec. 11. 

CAL'FORNIA THE-TE8. 

Bush street, above Kearny.— .Toll n Me Oil lough. Proprietor 
and Manager ; Barton Hill, Acting Manager. Second Week of the Engagement 
of EMMA WALLER, who will appear this evening, February 5th, as ELIZABETH, 
QUEEN OF ENGLAND, in Giacometti's Grand Historical play of that name. This 
(Saturday) Afternoon, THE DUCHESS OF MALFI ! for the last time. Special.— 
The Management respectfully announces that on Monday Evening next, February 7, 
EMMA WALLER will appear in her grand impersonation of LADY MACBETH, in 
Shakspeare's Tragedy of MACBETH, a part in which Mrs. Waller is considered with- 
out a rival, and her rirst appearance in this city in this, her greatest character. The 
play will be presented with unusual attention to detail in Scenic and Mechanical ef- 
fects, with all Locke's beautiful music. Feb. 5. 

"WADE'S OPERA H0tT, c E, 

Mission street, between Third mil Fourth. — F. TV. Bert, 
Lessee and Manager. FABBRI OPERA ! Sunday Evening, February 0th, 
for the first time, with grand new scenery and costumes, JOSEF IN EGYPT ; or, 
JACOB AND HIS SONS ! Grand Historical and Dramatic Opera, in three acts, by 
Mehul. Second Appearance of Jacob Muller. By kind permission of Mr. W. A. 
Woodward, several Camels will appear in the 'procession. Scale op Prices. — 
—Dress Circle, *?1 50 ; Parquette and Urchestra, £1 ; reserved, )?1 50. Family Circle, 
50 cents; reserved, 75 cents. Gallery, 25 cents. Mezanine Boxes, 810 and S3. Pro- 
scenium Boxes, 815 and S12. Seats can be reserved at Sherman & Hyde's Music Store, 
corner Kearny and Sutter streets, Thursday and Friday, from 10 A.M. to 4 p.m. ; at 
Wade's Opera House, Saturday, from 10 to 4, and Sunday from 10 to 2. Feb. 5. 

MAG'JIRE'S OPERA HOUSE. 

Biisii street, bet. Montgomery anil Kearny.— T. Majrnire, 
Sole Proprietor.— This Evening and Every Evening and Saturday Matinee. 
Sixteenth Week, and Greatest Success on Record of the Famous CALIFORNIA 
MINSTRELS! Another Great Star Added! The Acknowledged Star Comique, 
JOLLY NASH ! The management has, at an enormous expense, secured the services 
of this valuable artist for a limited engagement, he being the Greatest Mimic and 
Comic Vocalist on the face of the globe. Everything New this Week. The Greatest 
Programme of the Season. Concluding with the Screaming Farce, THE MERRY 
WIVES OP WINDSOR. Mondav, February 7th— First Appearance of THE HAMP- 
TON STUDENTS, six in number. Feb. 5. 

~~ ~" WADE'S OPEa* HOTJSE, 

Mission street, near Third.— -Frederick XV. Bert, Lessee and 
Manager. Closing Nights and Unabated Success of the Grand Spectacular 
Drama, in five acts, of SNOWFLAKE ! Universal Admiration of the Grand Floral 
Ballet, with a Complete Change of Costumes, Properties and Mechanical Effects. 
Last Nights of M'LLE EUGENP > LUPO, the Brilliant Premiere Danseusc Aseoluta, 
M'lle Christina, M'lle Priola, M'lle Rita, and a Full and Complete Corps do Ballet. 
Grand Matinee this Aftornoon. Sunday Evening, February tSth— The Fabbri Opera 
Troupe in the opera of JOSEF IN EGYI'T. Feb. 5. 

NEW BELLA "ONION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washing-ton ami Jackson.--- Samuel 
Tetlow, Proprietor ; W. C. Crosbie, Stage Manager ; E. Zinimer, Musical Di- 
rector. Monday, January 31st. UNA EDWIN and BLAND HOLT, Specialty and 
Burlesque Artists, PAUL MARTlNbTTI. ALFKED MAUTINETTl, andJOSEPHINE 
MICHELY, the Renowned Pantomimists. MISS KITTY H liNDERSON and GE< >lti : E 
F. MOORE, the Great Dutch Cominues. COG1LL and COOPER, Celebrated Song 
and Dance Artists. Feb. 5. 



I876L] 



CALIFORNl \ ADVERTISER. 



THEATRICAL* ETC. 
foral » Theater..- 

■ 

tii ber 

. . 

it tempt wu of Mich « vrid«ly dUferoul Mtun u feoplaoa 

' U-. DD til-- Mil 

difficult line of the drama. John 
itinnH which, with 
'in. -t works, m»y be squally i 
tudyor behind thegtmrool the footuffhts. 
i tli<- death of tl»- immortal 
bard of Avon, tli--r«- vraa ye! sutli.i.-nt tiiu.-int-'i \ .iniu- 1 i •often down the 
whlbit it ^t iil maintained that sublimity 
of thought and depth of pathos with which 9 

■I of dramatic authorship. One oannot follow the oonne of the 
unwise > el chaste love of the Diu-In-ss, wit no* ln-r hitppiiu-ss, lit i- <h>uUs 
and foam, the retribution ol her cruel hearted brother, and hex terrible 
death, without having all the emotions "i both heart and mind brought 
!'n ly into i lay. And yet, in thestrongrj marked oharaeter "f this tragedy) 
principal pitfall of which the moat careful actress lias to beware. 
afoal performers on the tragic itags now ■ days mistake quantity for qual- 
ity, rantmg instead of actingj^anu "knowing not how a soul should be 
moved. 1 It is In this Mrs. waller's finest points shine forth. The first 
: 'or no marked exhibition "f talent on her part, though the 
in the corridor, where she makes her love known to the handsome 
steward, exemplifies the versatality of the lady's genius. But it is when 
danger and difficulty threatens her lover and herself, when Burrounded by 
tin- machin ttions of a crafty cardinal and cold-blooded Hidalgo, it in then 
that the difficulties of this superbly dramatic character commence. Tor- 
. first ber separation bum her husband, then by imprisonment, in 
company with howling maniacs, and lastly by premature visits of her 
executioners, she still retains her nobility of spirit and firmness of pur- 
But when the (apparently) dead body of her husband is brought 
before her view, her calmness deserts her. giving way to the madness of 
pent up grief. This may be aaid to be the culminating point of Mrs. 
Wallers excellence, her really superb acting at this juncture 
being of the highest order, and causing * thrill of horror 
t» vibrate through the nerves of her attentive audience. The rest 
of the fourth act, finishing with the strangulation of the "Duch- 
ess," though Eraught with interest from an artistic point of view, is too 
genuinely horrible to be pleasant. Taken as a specimen of her power in 
■I of acting, which, we regret to say, ia now almost obsolete, Mrs. 
Waller's reading of the character is admirable. From the first time she 
presents herself, in the bloom of youth and beauty, to the last sad scene, 
in which her trials are ended, she obtains the full sympathy of the audi- 
ence; and on Monday night hist wad repeatedly recalled. In Mr. Keene, 
U her brother " Ferdinand," she found an able assistant, his acting 
throughout being careful and well conceived. His cold, crafty villainy 
during the first four acts was a splendid specimen of his power in that line 
of the drama he so well effects. His denunciation of " Bossola " (Mr. 
Henry Edwards) was grand in the extreme, whilst the change from 
stalwart cruelty to senile idiocy, in the fifth act, was remarkably good. It 
is here, however, where caution is needed, for here he perceptibly rants 
instead of rages, and rather exceeds the bounds of his text. Some four 
seasons ago, in New York City, at a farewell dinner given to John 
Brougham by his confreres, the discussion turned upon the question as to 
what constituted the most effectively dramatic " situation " now on the 
legitimate stage, and the verdict, on being 1 put to vote, was singularly 
unanimous in favor of the scene of the second actof Giacometti's Elizabeth, 
in which, on receiving a blow from his Royal mistress, the Earl of Essex, 
after apostrophizing his degraded sword in one of the grandest monologues 
ever written, snaps it across his knee and dashes it at the feet of the furi- 
ous Queen. We presume Mr. Keene will fill this character, and therefore 
look forward to his appearance with renewed interest. With the excep- 
tion of Mr. Harry Edwards, the rest of the cast was very indifferent, Mr. 
John Wilson, as thtv " Cardinal," making himself up as a very " lean and 
hungry" prelate, indeed. 

Fabbri Opera. — The performance on Sunday evening last of Ernan 
may be said to have been fairly successful; indeed, after the numerous 
fiatcos that occurred at Piatt's Hall, and the poor representation of Lcs 
Hi'imnots on the prev : ous Sunday, the improvement was more marked. 
The interest in Ernani is divided between " Don Carlos" (Jacob Mueller), 
" Ernani " (T. Hableman) and ''Donna Elvira" (Madame Fabbri), and is 
replete with charming music and excellent orchestration, and may be 
fairly considered as one of the gems of Verdi's repertoire. Madame Fab- 
bri, who was in remarkably good voice, sang 1 with her usual fervor, and 
by her skillful rendition of the difficult aria, "Ernani Involami," com- 
pelled the plaudits of her crowded audience. Mueller's "Don Carlos " 
was a very fair representation of the character, though he seemed suffer- 
ing somewhat from a cold. His execution in some places, however, was 
very imperfect, and it is evident his popularity rests mainly on his re- 
markably fine voice. Mr. Hableman is returning to his old style that 
marred his appearance at Piatt's Hall last season. He sang abominably 
flat during the first two acts, and, though he improved somewhat in the 
last, yet his inaccuracies were so paramount that he literally spoilt the 
beauties of the music assigned to him. Of the concerted music, the trio, 
in the second act, and the Jinate, of the third, were excellent; and the trio 
in the first act would have been equally good had it not been for the evi- 
dent wish of Mr. Mueller to monopolize the attention of the audience. 
The less said about chorus the better, for until Madame Fabbri makes 
some marked change in this department of her company, it must fail to 
give satisfaction. 

We are pleased be able to inform the musical community of San 
Francisco of the gradual progress toward recover of Mr. Alfred Kelleher. 
This gentleman is such a deserved favorite that his late serious illness has 
caused great solicitude. He proceeds to the Springs as soon as he is able 
to endure the fatigue of the journey. 

English and French Tuition. — Mr. A. P. Dietz, Doctor of Philos- 
ophy, from the University of France, and Licentiate Teacher from the 
Public Schools of this city, offers his services as an experienced and a suc- 
cessful instructor in the French language, together with all the English 
branches. For particulars apply at 946 Folsom street, San Francisco. 



R. W. HEATH & CO. 
In our met week's issue ws with which 

(plan 
til ol thcire, iwued tu a 

These gentli men cai y forward with u explanation, 

effect that said in the main i tjust, but that tin 

lamination arose Irom on i 

■ " d I"- thuii i fa 

of the natural misconstruction of the nature of certain ii ma Fori cample, 
certain sales of stock three ins! moss of which we bad quoted apj 
in their statement as regular ins of the date given with each, 

u hen in fact they were btrjrer B " operations, and the pnci erned bj 

the date of contract four or five days previous, The aooountant'i error 
consisted in his failure in distinctly and intelligibly statin- the praouM na- 
ture ol each transaction, by giving the date really governing the some in- 
stead of the one upon which such items were nettled, and which Latter bad, 
therefore, nothing to do with the quotations on which the transactions 
based, 

\\V took occasion to say. in onr previous article, that we were Qnwilling 
to believe a firm that hud heretofore borne a reputation for fair dealing 
and integrity could deliberately perpetrate the swindle a literal acceptance 
of their own figures would indicate. We take pleasure, therefore, in re- 
cording the fact that a critical review of the booKsof these gentlemen re- 
lieves them from any such grave imiiutntiun. While we are bound to admit 
that this firm seem* to have acted with ordinary business fairness towards the 
ciisiomtT whose cause we advocated, we are compelled to dissent in t >!■> to 
the Bystem of accounts at present pursued by them, and too many other 
brokers. It is inadequate, confusing and involved. It will always give 
rise to the just dissatisfaction of the customer, and to constant and un- 
avoidable misunderstanding. 

The public have a right to expect that every formal business statement 
be a plain, distinct and uneqnivocably intelligible record, and not an in- 
volved and ambiguous combination of technicalities, which are Greek to 
the uninitiated, and but too often conveniently cover, in their intricacies, 
many ingenious overcharges and petty extortions. Reform this altogether, 
gentlemen. 

In an advertisement below will be found the new business card 
of Messrs. Stairley & Kaverstick, Stock and Money Brokers, No. 410£ 
California street. These gentlemen have been for some time connected 
with the business department of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company 
in responsible positions, from which they have resigned to go into business 
under the above title. The well known energy and vim of the gentlemen, 
and the auspices under which they start, are such as to assure them a nit e :. 
successful future. 

The arrangements for the coming childrens' fancy and masquerade 
ball are steadily approaching completion. Nearly all the paraphernalia 
for the grand inarch is in readiness, and twenty-four ponies are bespoken 
to be attached to the gigantic cars, etc, that will form part of the proces- 
sion. By next Saturday we shall be better able to inform our readers of 
the arrangements of this grand festival. 

Clothes may not make the man, but there is no question that they 
have an immense deal to do with making other people's estimation of him. 
It is therefore imperative that when one buys a new suit he procures it 
from some firm employing such a cutter as delights the patrons of Purdy 
& Litchfield, corner of Washington and Sansome streets. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post street, between Mason and 
Taylor. Rev. Dr. Scott, pastor, will preach on Sunday at 11 A. M. and 
7 A p. m. Subject in the evening : " Catacombs of Rome." The public 
are cordially invited. 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Losses Paid — 82,820,000.— A sterling- California Co., with 
a national reputation for promptness and fair dealing-, gained during thirteen 
years of service. Assets — 9753,467 57. 

D. J. STAPLES, President ; ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President. 
Geo. D. Dorin, Sec. ; W. J. Duttok, Ass't Sec. Jan. 29. 

D. G. SCdFIELD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers, bay and sell all stocks, and 
carry same on margin. Our Mr. Scofield, late of and for many years the junior 
member of the well known mercantile firm of F. R TAYLOR & CO., will give his 
exclusive attention to filling all orders. Rooms H and 7, No. 315 California street, 
San Francisco. Feb. 5. 

W. M. SEAKBY, 

Draggist anil Pharmacist, s«;> Market street, opposite 
Powell, and Folsom street, corner Fifth, San Francisco. Choice Perfumery, 
Sachels, Colognes, Scented Soaps, Combs, Hair Brushes, Tooth Brushes, Bath and 
Face Sponges, Cosmetics, and other toilet requisites. Feb, 5. 



Spencer C. Browne. 



Gen. G. 11. Vernon 



S 



J. J. TOBIN. 

VEENON, TOBIN & CO., 
tock Brokers, Mon tgomery street, next Deposit^ Co.'s 

Vaults, San Francisco. Pacific Stock Exchange. 



Feb. 5. 



FURNITURE NOTICE. 

C Goodwin & Co. have not yet removed, but have replenished 
TT with an entire new stock of Parlor, Chamber and Dining- Room Suits. Great 
Bargains offered. GOODWIN & CO. , 

Feb. 5, No. 312 Pine street. 

W. Stairlev.] STAIRLkY & HAVERSTlCK, [W. H. Haverstick. 

Stock and Money Brokers, 410 1-2 California street. Orders 
received for purchase and sale uf mining stocks. Feb. 5. 

ST. VAIENilNE. 
oncer t. Fancy Dress and Masquerade Ball for Children 

and Young Folka, at Mechanics' Pavilion, .Monday Evening. Feb. 14. Feb. 5. 



c 



T 



ME^. CORLETT, 
ciidKT Of English ami Italian Singing, tne PianO FOrte, 

and Elocution, 331 Kearny street, Room 18. Jan. 2°. 



ART ASSOCIATION. 
Bierstadt's " Sunset on the Headwaters of the Green River," 'Wyoming . 

ROBERT GEORGE Accountant, 

Boom 1, Sberman's Building. 606 Montgomery street. [July 



6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1876. 



THE FALSE FRIEND. 

Our hands have met, but not our Then farewell to heart and hand ! 

hearts ; I would our hands had never met : 

Our hands will never meet again. Even the outward form of love 
Friends if we have ever been, Must be resigned with some regret. 

Friends we cannot now remain : Friends we still might seem to be, 
I only know I loved you once. If I my wrong could e'er forget. 

I only know I loved in vain; [hearts; Our hands have joined, but not our 
Our bands have met, but not our hearts ; 

Our hands will never meet again ! I would our hands h ad never met ! 

INTERESTING STORY OF A SPARROW. 
Mr. F. B. Grant St. Peter's Square, Hammersmith, writes as follows 
to the Spectator; The Rectory of Christ Church, in the island of Barba- 
does, West Indies, where I resided, is prettily situated amidst trees, on a 
hill overlooking a fishing village, where the waters of the sea, on a clear 
summer day, are of all colors of green, and where the tropical heat is 
softened down by a constant land breeze. This is just the abode suited to 
birds, and consequently the neighborhood abounds in sparrows. Being 
alone at the time, many of the sparrows soon struck up an acquaintance 
with me, and were among the first to make their appearance in the most 
unceremonious manner at the breakfast table. One of them, however, 
more familiar than the rest, seemed determined that I should adopt it as a 
pet. By degrees I induced it to pick bread crumbs out of my hand. Our 
acquaintance gradually matured into unsuspecting friendship, and ended 
at last in positive love, as the sequel will show. Lengthened time rolled 
on, and every day the sparrow was my constant companion. If I was in 
my study, it was there. If I was reading in the drawing-room, it was 
perched on the tip of my boot. If I did not rise by daylight, it would 
come in at the window, left open purposely for its convenience, and flutter 
upon my body, begging, as it were, that I would attend to its early wants. 
And more than this. I missed the bird for a while, and grieved, thinking 
that it had fallen a prey to some voracious cat or to the gunshot of some 
wayfaring traveler. Every day I went to the accustomed window and 
called it by name (for I had given it the name of " Dick "), but no Dick 
appeared. I persevered, however, in loudly calling for it, as it knew my 
voice well ; and after an absence of some weeks, I one morning observed 
three sparrows flying directly towards me. I held out my hand as usual, 
and they alighted on the palm of it. To my agreeable surprise, there was 
Mr. or Mrs. Dick (I know not which), with two well-fledged olive branches, 
which were handed over to me for adoption. This is not all. Mrs. Dick 
— for from her affection I shall assume it was the mother -bird — resolved to 
build her nest another time nearer home, and repeatedly came to me with 
a straw in her beak, evidently hoping that I would be her assistant-archi- 
tect. Finding that I declined the task, she selected a rose-tree, which I 
could easily touch from my bed-room window, and there, entwining three 
of the tallest branches, she built (as birds only can build) a beautiful nest. 
From this time she continued to commit her fledglings, as a matter of 
course, to my care. But here comes the climax. The time drew near for 
me to leave the West and to join my family in England, where I am now. 
It seemed as if my Bparrow, by instinct, amounting almost to reason, sus- 
pected my movements. Perhaps there was something lonely and strange 
in the appearance of the rectory, the greater portion of the furniture hav- 
ing been removed ; but be it what it may, Mrs. Dick, although she lived 
unfettered in the trees, and had the range of the atmosphere, would scarce 
quit my presence, and mtrabi/c dicta, on returning home one moonlight 
night, I found the loving bird sleeping like a peaceful infant on my pillow. 
I could scarce believe my own eyes, but so it was. On approaching to see 
if it was really a sparrow, it flew upon the top of the wardrobe, and there 
it remained all the night. The character of Mrs. Dick was well known, 
and numerous visitors (among whom I may mention the name of Bishop 
Mitchinson), often 'witnessed the influence I had over the syjarrow tribe, 
especially over the one that appeared to sorrow most of all at my departure. 
I won them by gentleness and kindness, and my reward was ample. 

WANTED FOR THE CENTENNTATi 
A blue-bellied Yankee from Maine. A little Concord from New 
Hampshire. A green 'un from Varmount. A section of Plymouth 
Rock from Massachusetts. A handful of earth (if it can be spared) from 
Rhode Island. A treu bleu from Connecticut. A New York politician 
who doesn't want to be Boss. A Jersey foreigner. To know who's found 
little Delaware. Free coal and iron from Pennsylvania. Mary's lamb 
from Maryland. A Virginian who is not a descendant of Pocahontas. A 
North Ca'lina corn-cracker. A South Ca'lina Ku-Klux. A Georgia fire- 
eater. From the other Southern States — Some truly lo'il Secesh, an honest 
legislation, defunct carpet-baggers ad lib, and some free niggers. From 
the Western States— A wind bag and rag baby, Allen's fog-horn, two or 
three tons of repudiated bonds, a Kansas grasshopper, another Presidential 
brother-in-law, a modest Cbicagoan. From the Territories — An honest 
Indian Agent and some " good Indians (packed in ice) ; also a few bor- 
der ruffians in wooden overcoats. From the Pacific Coast — Very hard 
cash without any chin music, a perennial stwabewwy, a careful and scien- 
tific farmer, a public- spirited citizen, a bloated monopoly, and some re- 
spectable assassins and stock-sharps. From Canada — A thistle. Mexico — 
Maximilian's bloody shirt. South America — A choice assortment of assas- 
sinated Presidents and pronunciamentos, and some mongrels to represent 
the effects of emancipation and amalgamation. From England — A first- 
class privateer and a real live Duke (one of Madame Tussaud's). France — 
A financial system, the unpaid bill £or Louisiana, a Communist. Ger- 
many — A stringent Press Law. Spain — A Bourbon and some stuffed 
Dons. Italy — A Pope's nose. Turkey — A sick man. Holland— A native 
Orange. Belgium — A Brusselles belle. Scandinavia — An ancient mar- 
iner. Denmark — A rotten statement of the Schleswig-Holstein affair. 
Russia — Some free serfs and Polish exiles. Ireland — A poor law. From 
Africa — An enlightened nigger. China — The Burlingame Treaty and 
Coolie slaves. Australia — A treadmill with convicts at work. Fiji — A 
missionary done brown. Hawaii — A leper. The Moon — A delegation to 
admire our free institutions. 

The Commissionei-s will not consider any bid in which the contractor 
refuses to diwy. The right reserved to reject any other bid except those 
of Mr. Grant's brothers-in-law. Address, 

Centennial Commissioners (in Luna t), Philadelphia, Pa. 



Hotel prices in New York are described as being ' 
day, board and lodging extra. 



three dollars a 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

NO 314 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

AGENTS FOE THE 
Franklin Ins. Co. . . . Indianapolis, Ind New Orleans Ins. Ass'n New Orleans. 



People's Ins. Co, Memphis, tenn 

Home Ins, Co Columbus, Ohio 

People's Ins. Co Newark. X. .1. 

National L. I. Co., U. S. A. . Wash'n, D. C 



Penn Fire Ins. Co Philadelphia 

St. Paul F, & M. Ins. Co. ..St, Paul, Minn. 

Atl&slns. Co Hartford Conn. 

yt. Nicholas Ins. Co New York 



Capital Represented, Twelve MillionB. 
POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY AT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HI HHINSOX. MANN A SMITH, General Agents, 

Dec. 5. 314 California street, San Francisco. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 
~\fo. 406 California street, next door to Bank of California. 

_X^ Fire Insurance Company. Capital, ^3w,ulhj. Okkiclrs : — J. F. Houghton, 
President ; Ceo. H. Howard, Vice-President ; Charles R. Story, Secretary. H. H. 
BIGELOW, General Manager. 

Directors.— San Francisco— Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Atherton.H. F. Teseheroacher, 
A. li. Grogan.John H. Redington, A. W. Bowman, C. S. Hobbs, B. M. Hartshorne, 
D. Conrad, Win. H. Moor, George S. Johnson, H. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood. S. L. 
Jones, George S. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W, T. 
Garratt, C. Waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling. Oregon Branch — P. Wassernian, B. Gold- 
smith, L. F. Grover, D. Macleay, C. H. Lewis, Lloyd Brooke, J. A. Crawford, D. M. 
French, J. Lowenberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
ville— D. E. Knight. San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch — diaries 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Earl, 
Isaac Lohman, Julius Wetzlar ; Julius Wetzlar, Manager ; I. Lohman, Secretary. 
Stockton Branch— H. H. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. Orr, W. F. 
Mcliee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, H. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett, Manager ; N. 
M. Orr, Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Belden, A. Pfister, J. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B, D. Murphy , J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley— William ttatt, Robert Watt. Ne- 
vada — T. W. Sigourney. Feb. 17. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFOENrA. 

Fire anil Marine.— -C. W. Kellogg-, President; Charles A. 
Laton, Secretary. Cash Assets, January 1st, 1875, s^nS.sOa 91. Directors : 
W. W. Dodge, of W. W. Dodge & Co., Merchants; Claus Spreckels, President Cal- 
ifornia Sugar Refinery ; Seidell S. Wright, Judge County Court ; W. B. Cumnrings, of 
W. B. Cummings & Co., Merchants ; Bartlett Doe, of B. & J. S. Doe, Manufacturers ; 
Frank Eastman, Printer ; C. W. Kellogg, of Wilmerding & Kellogg, Merchants ; A. 
W. Jee, Merchant ; Peter Dean, Capitalist ; John H. Wise, of Christy & Wise, Mer- 
chants ; C. J. Deering, of Deering & Co., Merchants ; Levi Stevens, of Stevens, Ba- 
ker & Co., Merchants; A. J. Pope, of Pope & Talbot, Ship Owners, etc; Charles 
Main, of Main &, Winchester, Merchants ; B. G. Crane, of Hayes, Hastings & Co. 
Mercl-ants; W. L. Elliott, U.' S. A. ; George L Bradley, Capitalist. Sacramento ■ 
H. S. Crocker, of H. S. Crocker & Co., Merchants ; N. D. Thaver, Capitalist ; F S 
Freeman, of Woodland, Capitalist ; D. H. Haskell, C. P. R. R.' Office in San Fran- 
cisco : No. 228 California street, Tallant's New Bank Building, N. E. comer Califor- 
nia and Battery streets. May 22. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UNION INS. CO. OF S. F- 

The California Lloyds. — Established in 1S61.— Xos. 416 and 
418 California street. Cash capital ^750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco— J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool, A. Weill, N. G. Kittle, Jabez 
Howes, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustavo Touchard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox, T. Lem- 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindenberger. Sacramento— Ed w. Cadwaiader, J. F. 

Houghton, L. A. Booth. Marvsvillk— L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portland, 0. 

Henrv Failing. New York— J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Bourn, Surveyor. Oct. 26. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIRE AND MARINE. 

("1nsh Assets, 8430,00O.— Principal office, 409 California 
j street, San Francisco. Officers :— Peter Donahue, President ; A J. Bryant, 
Vice-President ; Charles H. Cushino, Secretary. Board of Directors :— Peter Dona- 
hue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, J. D. Coughlin, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, 
R. Bailey, E. W. Corbert, George 0. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixlcy, E Burke, 
H. H. Watson, Alexander Austin, P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard 
Ivers.'John Rosenfeld. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, F. P. F. Tem- 
ple, Los Angeles. Wm. Bihler, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale Mayfield. C. T. Ry- 
and, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY. EIRE AND MARINE. 

Established 1S59. Capital 85,000,000 ; Paid I > Capital, 
$1,200,000 ; Surplus Assets, ¥374,469. Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 
Underwrite, through the medium of their Agents, against loss by fire of every de- 
scription, and for voyage or time on Hulls, Merchandise, Freights," etc., to and "from 
all parts of the world, at the current rates of premium. Claims adjusted and paid 
in San Francisco, London, Glasgow, or any of the Company's Australian or New Zea- 
land offices, at the option of the insured. HUGH CRAIG, 
May 1. Agent for California, No. 307 California street. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Has transacted the business oi' Tiife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Foirteex Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is "the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April '23. ] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $5,000,000. ---Agents: Balfonr, Guthrie & Co., No. 
230 California street, San Francisco. No. IS. 

NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, ($15, 000,000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
wards of §6,760,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, £1,380,000. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 310 California street, San Francisco. 

REMOVAL. 

L. H. Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morbib Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers iu Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 200 California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. 



Kch. :.. is;.;.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



LONGING 



■ ttuoug 

W 

1 

■it iii'in-'iit ; 

; . I>:\rv, 

t '.ui malu n • mment, 

Still ihrowfa our paltry itiraad itrifa 

Grows down th« wished Idea] ; 
And tooginji mouldi in elny whtl 
Ufa 

l \ir\ M in t!:-- ln:irl>l<- iv;»l ; 

To let the now lift- In, w« know, 

l>. Mrv moat "]"• tin* portal] ; 
Perhaps the longing t 

make tlu* soul immortal. 



award 
will, 

ii pool earthward - ; 

\Y. .(II. II. )i il tint Vto lli:iY ; 

1 

■ !i it heart a full 
Which we ;tiv hourly w ron 
Our Utsi muet climb from hope to 
hope, 
Aii. I realise on« longing. 

Ah : let u li"j»- tluit to oar praise 

Good <;*xl not only reckons [wave, 
The momenta when we tread In* 

But « hen tin- spirit beokena, 
That some alight goodia also 9 

Beyond aeU aatufaotion, 
Whenweareaun^ly g I in thought, 

Howe'er we fail in action. 

./.t net fittatsH 1,-uctlf. 



INDIAN JUGGLERS BEFORE THE PRINCE OF WALES 
One day at Farell Hie Royal Sighneaa had an hour of auiel amuse- 
iiK-ut in camp, wat thing the tricks of some Indian jugglers and Bnake 
oharmers, which have been described a hundred times over, and which 
never loee their intereal for the spectator. After breakfast a ragged train 
of fellows leading apes and < » were seen coming up the main 

street »f the camp t»> one "f the tents. These were followed by seven or 
eight ugly, shapeless, elderly w omen in bright draper} . carrying what are 
e nisi lered here musical instruments. Tin y :ill squatted midtr the alunle 
of the trees in front *>f one of the tents apart -conjurers, ape-leaders, 
ifaflfrg women. 

The jugglers and snake oharmers were the first to show off. They were 
only two old chatty fellows, whose akin hung on their bones as if it were 
cracked brown paper. They 'Hi! some clever "passes," swallowed and 
spat "ut tire, produced an enchanted, inexhaustible water vessel, walked 
.in wooden pattens held on by the action of the feet making a vacuum— in 
hut the withered vivacious old juggler and his ragged old confederate per- 
formed all tl rthodox tricks of their confraternity. Where did he get 

the cobras which he produced suddenly out of two baskets which had 
been turned over, inside oat, in oar presence 1 It was not the drumming 
of his friend or the playing on the dry gourd which drew the reptiles out 
of cover. 

Meanwhile a mango under the dirty cloth was growing, and in an inter- 
val of snake work the old fellow dashed at the latter and exposed a fresh 
bright -Teen mango tree some eighteen inches high in the ground, where 
he had apparently only put in a mango seed. Expressions of wonder fol- 
lowed; then the cloth was thrown over the tree and another of the famous 
legendary legerdemain feats was executed. A shallow basket about 
eighteen inches high and three feet long, with a cover, was placed before 
the Prince. It was plain their was no deceit. At a call there came out 
from the group of natives near at hand a lad of twelve, or so, slight of fig- 
mv and jdeasant of face, with not an article of dress save his loin cloth 
and a dirty turban. Hint the old man, chattering the while, bound hand 
and foot, a la Brothers Anyone, in twine. Then a sack, made of strong 
netting, was produced, and the old fellow slipped it over the lad, whom 
he squeezed down on his haunches so that he could tie the the cords se- 
curely over the head and lift him from the ground to prove how secure he 
was. He seemed to use great force to put the lad into the basket, and 
nave much difficulty in fitting the lid on top of him. When that was 
done the music was renewed by one, and the other juggler began to talk to 
his basket. Presently the basket was agitated, and the cord and net 
were jerked out and fell on the ground. Then the juggler ran at the bas- 
ket in a fury, jumped on the top, crushing in the lid, stamped on it, took 
a stick and drove it with force through the wickerwork. Ihe basket was 
empty. Then there came a voice as of the lad who had been inside, and 
lo, there was just such a youth upon one of the trees. The mango tree, 
when next uncovered^ appeared hung with tiny fruit. — Dr. Russell's Cor- 
respondence to the London Times. 

THE FIDDLE BY FTDELIO. 

In a most able article that appeared in the most ably conducted 
journal in the far East, it was argued that English girls, as a rule, could not 
be taught to sing, but that any girl might learn to play the fiddle. Without 
for a moment questioning the soundness of the argument, we must state 
our utter inability to comprehend the fascination of the fiddle. To us it 
appears the most ear torturing instrument ever invented by man ; the 
bagpipes are infinitely preferable. The only place where the fiddle is at 
all bearable is on the capstan of a man-of-war during- the heaving of the 
anchor ! We would ask our readers to imagine for a moment a soiree 
mtcstcafc with twenty-four lovely damsels fiddling away. Would it be 
possible to remain and not go mad? Could anything more excruciating be 
conceived ? Our ears ache at the mere thought. We protest against it. 
and would earnestly entreat our beloved sisters to shut their ears to the 
seductive eloquence of the elegant editor. It is not given to every one to 
he a Pagan ninny or a Jenny Claus, and therefore let those who are not 
born fiddlers abstain from torturing the ears of their fellow creatures. 

To show the contempt which most people feel for that instrument, do 
not we say fiddlesticks and fiddle-dee-dee when arguing with any one who 
talks nonsense? And in France when any one is locked up for the night, 
does not one say, " II a p<tsse la nuit ' au violon V " (he has passed the night 
at the fiddle.) The latter is a clincher, and decides the question; no 
further remarks are necessary. — China Punch. 

"We take a deep interest in everything pertaining to the steamship 
lines between our country and Europe, and hence are gratified to announce 
a piece of enterprise on the part of the Inman Company. They have de- 
cided to build two immense steamers for their New York and Liverpool 
trade, to be one hundred feet longer than any of the ships in the present 
fleet. According to reports, they are to be six hundred and twenty-five 
feet long, or only sixty-three feet shorter than the Great Eastern. In our 
opinion, this will be a great improvement, for ships of that length are al- 
ways very steady at sea. The Confederate blockade-runner, R. E. Lee, was 
a good example of vessels of this class, and she used to skim along overthe 
tops of the Atlantic waves with the grace and ease of a dolphin, aud with 
scarcely any disagreeable motion. — American Register of Paris. 



A CARD. 

11 lie Pari lie Jo«h«) Club return thank* In their follow -rl II- 
Ui Oiulr fct briiig 

lu tin- 81 
■ 

the arorM has in 
from tii> 

■ 

i which «vor3 
■ 
men vho have brnutfht thdr hones and rotlnu tullct, al 

mi . rtpei 

A. J. BRYAN I 



■ (air Hold " sod no favor, and ma; 

• I..IIS \I * 



November 6 



DIVIDENU NOTICE. 

MHSOIlIc .HllYlllgM II III! l.lillli Rail It . EfOt U I'lisl Mtrff't, ll.-i-.oilH 
i ample, San Pr m< Lsco. At n meeting <■( the Board •■( Director! <>f this Ban! 
held Januar) 18th, 1876, a dividend was declared at tho rata ol olne(D)per oent per 
annum on Tera Deposit* 1 , and seven and one-half (t{) per cant per annum on Ordi- 
nal 1 } Dopoatta, f'-r the semi annua] term ending January 21, 1876, parable on and af- 
ter Jenuarj ii, ' ^leral Tuxes. 
Jan. 29. H. T. GRAV ES, Been 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The Illberula Saving-" mil Loan Soclt'ly, Nnn Frnnchco, 
January £5, 1870, At a regular meeting of the Board ol Directorial the ni- 
bernla Savings and Loan Society, held this day, a dividend at the rate of elghl per 
oent. per annum was declared for the haU year ending January 21, L876\ free from 
[•Yik'i-.il Tux, imil iwviil'lu from ami after this date, 
Jan. 2». E DWARD MARTIN Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTJOS. 

Ortil Fellows' Savings Bank. ---The Board of Directors ol the* 
<)ild Fallows' Bavings Bunk have declared a XWvidend at the rate of nine HQ 
percent per annum on Permanent Deposits, and of seven and three tenth (7 8-10) 
percent, per annum on Short Deposits, for the somi-annual term ondlng December 
81, 1875, payable on aud-after January 24, lsro. JAS. BENSON, Secretary. 

Sun Francisco, January 10, 1870. Jan. 16. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tlie Farmers* mill Mechanics* Bank ol Savings <lcelarc a 
dividend for the half year ending December 81, 1876, at the rate <if ten pur cent. 

per annum on term, eight per cent on class 1 ordinary, and six j>er cent, per annum 
on class 2 ordinary deposits, payable on and after January 15, 1876, 

By order G. M. CONDEE, Cashier. 

San Francisco, January 5, 1876. Jan. 8. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Saving's and Loan Society. G19 Clay street.— -At a meeting 
of the Hoard of Directors, held January 11th. 1S76, a dividend, free of Federal 
Tax, of nine (9) ]K>r cent, per annum on all deposits, for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 81st, 1S75, was declared, payable on and after the ISth instant. 
Jan. 22. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The French Savings and Loan Society has fleelareil a div- 
idend of nine (it) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half year 
ending December 31at, lS". r >, payable on and after January 17th, 187G. By order, 
Jan. 22. GUSTAVE MAHE. Director. 

D. F. Hotchisos. D. M. Dlnse. J. Sanderson. 

PH02VIX OIL WOHK?. 

Established! 1850. — Hatchings .v Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

WARNER'S SALOON, 

North Beach, on Meiggs" "Wharf.— For Fancy Dogs of pure 
breed and Hare Birds from Australia, China, Japan, and New Zealand, and 
all other parts of the world, go and see him. Take a drink. "The cars will drop .you at 
his door. Jan. 8. 



F. C. Snow.] 



[\V. B. Mat 



SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. 

S>«AV A MAT, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Pictures, Frames, Moldings, aud Artists' Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S, F. Dec. 19. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIEIY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary. 
Oct. 23. 1^ Montgomery street. 

CUTTER WHISKY. 

A P. Hotalin? A Co., No. 431 Jackson street, are the Solo 
. Agents on this Coast for the celebrated J. H. CUTTER WHISKY, shipped di- 
rect to them from Louisville, Kentucky. The Trade are cautioned against the pur- 
chase of inferior and imitation brands of "J. H. Cutter Old Bourbon." Owing- to 
its deserved reputation, various unprincipled parties are endeavoring to palm off 
spurious grades. It is really the Best Whisky in the United States. March 19. 

A- S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

Have removed to the Southeast corner of California and 
Battery streets, where they invite the attention of their custumers and others 
to their large 'assortment of the Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOKING 
TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS and CIGARITOS. Consignments of Choicest Brands 
of Cigars received by every Steamer. [Oct 18 ] A. S. ROSENBAUM &. CO. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Fkanoisco. t [May 24. 

SHARP & ILOYD 

Have Removed their Offices to Rooms \os. 9, 10, 11, 12 and 
13 on the Second Floor, Nevada Block, Northwest Corner Pine and Montgom- 
ery streets. Entrance on Montgomery street ; also, on Pine. The Rooms are on 
Pine str eet side of the Building. Dee. 18. 

WANTED, 

By a respectable aud Industrious young man, a situation 
in a first-class house as Salesman or Assistant Bookkeeper. Best of references 
given. Address " K-," this office 



Jail. 



OFFICES OF AERIAL STEAM NAVIGATION CO., 

No. 607 to 015 Merchant street, San Francisco. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1876. 



THAT FINANCIAL FILLIBUSTER AND HIS ALLY. 
On the second page of this issue will be found a condensed report of 
a debate that recently took place in the Parliament of New South Wales, 
in which the News Letter was made to figure somewhat prominently. 
The mail service via this city, the doings of the man Hall, and the 
astounding lengths to which the late Premier at Sydney went as Hall's 
ally, were the subjects debated. That the News Letter's information 
was precise and accurate in regard to the two former matters was ac- 
knowledged, but it seemed that Mr. Parkes' partisans preferred to exclude 
all statement of the grave political offences of which their leader had been 
guilty, and for which he ought to be impeached by a self-respecting 
Government. Some two or three years ago the Government of New 
South Wales invited tenders for a steam mail service via San Francisco. 
In response to that invitation, certain very prominent citizens of the 
United States, whom our people delight to specially honor for their enter- 
prise, success and invariable good faith, formed an organization and became 
tenderers. General Burnside, once commander-in-chief of the United 
States army, and now United States Senator — a man known throughout 
this country and Europe as the very soul of honor was one of these. 
Thos. A. Scott, whose master mind controls some five thousand miles i f rail- 
road, and who perhaps more than any other man alive is tlie representative 
of American enterprise, was another. New steamers were then ready for 
the service, which have since been plying between Philadelphia and Liver- 

fiool, and have made time and acquired a popularity hardly second to any 
ine afloat. The tender of General Burnside and his associates was duly 
forwarded to Sydney, proved to be the lowest, and moreover it provided 
that for a small additional sum the tenderers would supply a service not 
only far superior to that asked for, but also in excess of anything either 
attempted or suggested since. The Government at Sydney telegraphed 
the result to their agent in London (Sir Chas. Cowper) and instructed him 
to hold himself in readiness to proceed to New York to complete the con- 
tract with Burnside & Co. This news Sir Chas. Cowper telegraphed to 
General Burnside, together with the request that the General would 
inform him if he would be in New York at a certain date. This was 
courteously replied to, and so far matters seemed straightforward and 
regular. But from this point there was a display of insolent bad faith, 
stupidity and cupidity that has made the Government of New South 
Wales a by-word and a reproach in this country. If it were not for the 
good feeling and respect that is entertained throughout this country for 
New Zealand and its Government there would not, and could not now be 
a mail service via this city in which New South Wales has any share. 
Sydney ever since has been to us what the " sick man" is to the London 
stock exchange. We proceed to explain that whilst Mr. Parkes was hum 
bugging (we know no more appropriate phrase) General Burnside and Sir 
Chas. Cowper with pleasant telegrams, he was despatching his pliant 
Postmaster General, Mr. Samuels, and his former Employer, Mr. Hall, to 
London with power and instructions to supersede Sir Chas. Cowper, and 
to give Burnside and his associates the go bye. Of all this the General 
knew nothing until Hall and Samuels were about to arrive in England, at 
which time he received from Mr. Parkes, all the way from Sydney, a 
lengthy, cringing, sickly telegram, the burden of which was that the 
General's tender had arrived "too late." If that were so, why was Sir 
Chas. Cowper instructed in the manner he was ? The " too late" excuse 
was false in fact, and a disgrace to a country that permits its Government 
"to prove recreant to those principles of honor and good faith upon which 
alone iatercourse between civilized people is possible. If Mr. Smith or 
any other member wants to have this matter cleared up, let him or them 
ask for the production of all the papers. A show of producing them has 
been made, imt it is not the least of the complaints that the most im- 
portant documents have been wilfully suppressed. The following papers 
should be specifically asked for : 1st— The tender of General Burnside, 
and the letter which accompanied it. 2d — All telegrams in connection 
with this business sent to Sir Chas. Cowper, together with telegrams that 
passed between the latter and Burnside. 3d — Copy of any telegram sent 
direct to General Burnside. 4th — Copy of the letter addressed in London 
by the agent of Burnside & Co. to Samuels complaining of the bad faith 
of his Government. 5th — The Government, if not in possession of the 
document, should be requested to communicate with the Government of 
New Zealand, asking for a copy of the communication which its repre- 
sentative, the Hon. Thos. Russell, felt it his duty to send to General 
Burnside after he had failed to induce Mr. Samuels to keep good faith in 
this matter. 6th— Copies of all recommendations and other documents 
given by Mr. Parkes to Hall, which being signed in his official capacity or 
having the official seal attached to them, are properly public communica- 
tions. If these and all other documents are produced, our word for it, a 
case will be developed which in this country would lead to the impeach- 
ment of the ex-minister. By the action of Hall's ally his country has 
been disgraced abroad, two years of mail service failures have intervened, 
and New South Wales has lost the cheapest, most effective, and most 
Btrongly supported service that has ever been offered to her. 

"MEN WE KNOW." 
With this issue will be found the first two plates of the News Letter's 
new gallery of special engravings of the prominent and distinguished men 
of the Pacific Coast. In another column will be found brief biographies 
of this number, Messrs. Flood & O'Brien. These have been carefully and 
specially compiled and with exceptional advantages as to material. We 
believe they will be found to contain much relative to these gentlemen, 
about whom so much natural curiosity exists, that has been hitherto un- 
known. We shall continue this feature, with the object of placing, in 
the hands of the ]iatrons of the News 'Letter, and the public generally, re- 
liable histories and exact portraits of the men in our midst whose names 
have already become household words all over the country. Every pos- 
sible effort and the most unstinted outlay will be resorted to to render 
these worthy of the popularity that has already attended the announce- 
ment of their production. Every person should begin at once and frame 
these portraits as fast as they appear. In this way, all families and public 
places can obtain gratis a complete and exhaustive collection of beautiful 
engravings, and can decorate their walls with the faithful representation 
of each noted man in our midst. 



Advices from Peru of a very late date show that our prediction as to 
a general decline in silver has been fully carried out. There it has already 
fallen twenty per cent. We should not be surprised to witness a dis- 
count of ten pe"r cent on silver here within the next ninety days. 



FLOOD & O'BRIEN. 

The mightiness that riches bring 

Is theirs, for wrong or right, 
The power of Emperor or King 

Is weak beside their might. 
But it is not for this we trace 

The features of these men, 
% For length of purse or pride of place 

Would fail to move our peD. 
It is the way that they have used 

The place that they have won. 
The power that they have not abused, 

The good that they have done, 
The strength and health they gave the State 

When she lay weak and low — 
This, not their wealth, has proved them great, 

And made them "Men We Know." 
Success like theirs had. surely turned 

A common nature crazed, 
Old friends are used to being spurned 

When men with gold are dazed ; 
But these are very different men — 

We knew them long ago — 
And just the same as they were then, 

They still are — "Men We Know." 



CITY HOSPITAL STATISTICS. 

Recent inquiries made by Mr. Supervisor Gibbsinto the economy (the 
word is used technically) of the City Hospital have developed some rather 
startling facts, with regard to the consumption of alcoholic stimulants and 
eggs in that institution. We had the curiosity to submit the figures to 
our own statistician with the following results : Upon a lake formed by 
the quantity of whisky absorbed monthly by the patients, the battle of 
Trafalgar might be fought over again, or the desert of Sahara might be 
completely flooded with the same quantity to a uniform depth of 2^ 
inches. With the monthly allowance of brandy, an artificial Niagara 
might be got up for the Centennial, which would run steadily during the 
whole time of the show, provided there were no hospital patients either 
above or below the falls. The amount of gin consumed monthly is com- 
partively small (1,001 gallons is the figure, we believe), but nevertheless it 
is sufficient to make Supervisor B — y — e drunk if he took it all at one sit- 
ting, as he has been "tapering off" lately, and can't stand as much as he 
could. The monthly allowance of port wine would fill all the "flowing 
bowls " that topers have been warned against, in prose and verse, by tem- 
perance advocates for the past twenty years, though our statistician 
reckons that it would not fill half the number of " flowing bowls " that 
said advocates have themselves drained during the past six months. The 
entire monthly supply of the aforementioned stimulants, if ignited, would 
make a little hell, so hot that one thousand years' gnashing of teeth in the 
midst of it would absolve Fitch and Pickering from further punishment 
of their sins, or would if they had not lied about dead men and used the 
influence of their paper to peddle a poisonous nostrum. The monthly 
supply of eggs is so enormous that all the plots ever hatched against the 
News Letter might have come out of them ; while the price paid for them 
is (like that paid for Spring Valley water) simply eggscruciating. The 
doctors of the hospital, who, with the patients, are, of course, all tee- 
totalers, have accused Mr. Gibbs, to use the chaste language of a daily, of 
" sticking his nose where it didn't belong." So we illustrate the items as 
above to show that the worthy Supervisor's proboscis belonged just where 
he stuck it. 

Quackery of an Abominable Type. — A person known as Dr. R. 
Hilton Chase has occupied the quack institute of Aborn, on Kearny 
street, and has had circulars distributed at residences informing that he 
has made a "specialty of disea-ses peculiar to females," and, with other 
depraved verbiage, hopes to attract the attention of the deluded to this 
quack institute. A gentleman, the father of a family, has handed us 
one of this character's peculiar sheets, enclosed in an envelope, with the 
remark that " it is disgusting that the police have not the power t> arrest 
the author of the circulars, or prevent them being left at private resi- 
dences, where these are Hkely to fall into the hands of the young." We 
hope to do this person justice, and feel sure the community will profit by 
it. The worst of the case is that preachers of respectability disgrace 
themselves by allowing their names to be used ; sundry quacks having 
handed us a list of reverend gentlemen to whom they refer. These are 
printed on cards and circulars and distributed broadcast. 

An Important Decision. — In the Supreme Court on Friday, a 
full bench present, Chief Justice Wallace delivered a decision declaring 
the Mortgage Tax law unconstitutional, and directing the moneys so paid 
to be returned forthwith. This is one of the most important decisions 
rendered in our Supreme Court for years. We congratulate our readers 
upon this just and much needed decision, and the heavy burden it at 
once relieves property from. 

James W. Mandeville, Controller of the State, died day before 
yesterday at Sacramento. He was a man of marked ability and great 
energy of character, and during his lifetime held several prominent public 
positions. He was an honest man. In late years his physical and mental 
health failed visibly and painfully, but the record he made when strong 
and active was a most excellent one, and is part of the history of the State. 
We have too few such public men. 

In another column will be found the two recent letters of Governor 
Stanford to the Legislature. The masterly style, vigorous arguments, and 
convincing logic of the pamphlet in question have already procured a re- 
markable effect, especially in the East, upon the stock and bonds of the 
great road we owe to his energy and genius. 



We have the best authority for denying the rumored sale of the 
Palace Hotel by Senator Sharon to J. C. Flood and Wm. S. O'Brien. 
The report probably originated in the fertile brain of some industrious 
btock operator. 

Pianos are exempt from taxation in the Shetland Islands. There are 
no pianos there, but people feel just as grateful for the liberal law. 



76.] 



CALIFORNIA AI>\ KKTISKK. 







THE TOWN CRIER. 

*lU*r tb< • 

"Uo» tl>Al "ill f]>. «ith )<>u ' 



The profound intellects of th 

land of gold 

' partiality ex 

■:. -I region by tit-- new map >>i the world just 

I i ■<in the 
: tland ■ ditor th.- fullowh 
bstM* < iu boldly original nvmifigur.it inn >•( tha oartha nir 

" It mie ..nly h.i'l thi! making ol tha 
iMaa, hi>w .a-i!> uiH- i'.»uM in.iki- hi* town tli. ■ !-•• ut«r ol the terrestrial 
i ' ■ -• :i her* an. I the h idening oi a continent 

>r the gently curving the coast Line in another place, it 
:' plain tint Sen ftmi ol tl] khegeo- 

that are supposed t<- affect the commerce of the 
world, ;*.-< it i-» possible t.. ti\ that very important point We do not say 
lone in drawing the map referred tit. That we Lav.: fur in- 
fie fact which will be quickly understood by our Mad- 
Da to their own conjectural ai to the probable faithful- 
m of iit.' earth , on I Ixtj , and 

ire marked on the map ae nearh oorrectly asmight reasons 
I in .i representation so general as a map of the whole world must 
• b Lewiston, Idaho. Then Portland us reported on the north Bide 
of Snake River, just about the same distance below Lewiston as Oregon 
below Salem, on the Wallamet Wherever the Journal?* map 
sUuati-'ii ...f Portland will be misunderstood, and that greatly to 
j paper in the State will give toe benefit 
irculation to a correction of this misrepresentation." There is 
ling i«thetic in this cry of a lost soul compelled to gnash it-* teeth 
rii >>f the inveterate egotism of the Journal 
people. We tender our heartfelt sympathy t»> the inhabitants of those 
remote and undiscovered countries thus shut out of the pale of civilization 
try this unexpected blow. Recall your unfeeling and remorseltasmap 
i/, and once more permit the uttermost bounds of the earth 
within five minutes walk ox the depot, and possess other little mod- 
uli advantages. At least we bete yon t<> allow Jay Cooke's isothermal 
tine and banana belt to wander off in the direction of Portland. We be- 
lieve the inventor has no further use for it just now. 

Sweet communion with the nocturnal pull-back seems to be fraught 
with some new and entirely superfluous perns. By the Chronicle we per- 
ceive that " -Mr. Duncan, while driving on the Cliff House road-, with a 
young lady, at a late hour last night, was robbed of a gold watch and 

chain and his pockett k. The robber, with the old-time g.dlantry of 

the highwayman, took nothing from the young lady." Our admiration of 
this unlooked for benevolence is somewhat tempered by the fact, subse- 
quently developed, that the young lady had nothing to steal. This little 
incident, for several ol.viotis reasons, suggests the propriety of the imme- 
diate institution of a branch of the Safe Deposit Company on wheels — to 
ply between this city and the Cliff House. This would be cheaper than 
building an iron-clad tunnel, which seems to be the only other alternative 
in the present prolonged absence from the city of the police force. A 
handsomely upholstered four-horse burglar-proof safe, holding, say, half 
a dozen, against which the bullets of the midnight marauder would ex- 
pend their fruitless energy, would be an effective, not to say a safe, rem- 
edy for such inconvenient interruptions of the course of true love as the 
wove. 

The Muldoon Board of Brokers have gone into the spectacular 
show business. A glance into the transformation scene reveals a dazzling 
and gorgeous array of court uniforms and gold lace that are said to be be- 
wildering in the extreme. The Sergeant-at-arms promenades around 
among the awe-stricken brokers, surrounded by his glittering cohorts, in a 
manner forcibly suggestive of a brass foundry with the front door open. 
The Town Crier has not yet been favored with a press ticket to this gay 
and glittering scene, but he is informed that the Oriental magnificence of 
the i run nble tortures Manager Hill with envy, and bids fair to consign 
Ifanager Bert to an untimely grave. He is assured also that Coll Deane, 
attired in a blue and gold coat, and terminating in a pair of lavender silk 
tights, is a grandly sublime spectacle ; that the affable Lawton's imposing 
make-up renders him an acquisition to any fancy dress party without pre- 
vious notice ; while the Napoleonic front of Howard Coit, covered with 
the decorations of a hundred victories over the bulls and bears, and his 
handsome face surmounted by a cocked hat, is a sight to make angels 
raise their wings in admiration. 

The festive footpad has taken a new departure in his pleasing line of 
industry that would seem to entitle him to at least a milder species of 
criticism. By the dailies we see that five of the matudinal dispensers of 
chalk and water have been forcibly relieved of their fraudulent accumula- 
tions by these gentlemen of the bludgeon. We have now a dim perception 
that these diciples of Dick Turpin have not been quite fairly treated, and 
they have only to continue their late intelligent discrimination in the 
selection of their victims to entitle them to the amend honorable from the 
Town Crier and the press generally. Now if some one would decoy the 
Board of Supervisors out upon the only road these officials have left use- 
able by vehicles, or if some heaven inspired friend of man would entice 
Press-gag Laine out to the Cliff House and therefore iuto the immediate 
territory of these knights of the road, we could guarantee the mildest, not 
to say complimentary, notices of their predatory exploits thereafter. The 
last suggestion strikes us as peculiarly happy and admirable, and the Neivs 
Letter will cheerfully liquidate any amount of hack hire incurred in car- 
rying out so public a benefit. 

"These Celestials is improving" admiringly remarked a horny-handed 
miner at Gold Hill the other day, when a son of Confucius made a new 
departure for his race by promptly shooting a partner of said miner en- 
gaged in the cheerful pastime of stealing Ah Wing's mule. The Town 
Crier desires to underline the above comment with a heartily approving 
pat on the back for the Heathen Chinee. The question of Chinese immi- 
gratii in, and the evils that lie back of it, have nothing whatever to do with 
the monotonous brutality meted out to the individual Chinaman on this 
coast. And we trust that this wholesome example will be followed here- 
after by every one of these meek and long suffering children of the Orient 
put upon by the devil-inspired hoodlum or the drunken bullies that make 
our city's saloons breathing holes of hell. 



A serious L-outl" | week in the lmm< 

v he Worked up into dnlhkJ 
beet 

thus roimuniod had boon the able 
a few v. , llt (,, 

'* JEveroi Hum " on that mal tnt until about half 

"in The sin ulai ■ oiii idem 
upon that the unfortui n had bad the misfortune te 

Ken burned out of no leas than three other 1 ma in that • ti 

than two months, Now the / n Crier wishes to avoid thi 

onal bias on hut part against the divine art Heal 
tieularly de>ire- to prevent the Inspiration of ■ dark and shadowy suspicion 
in the mind of the reader ; but Ids native oandor compels him to admit 
that whenever hie virtuous slumbers are disturbed by the preliminary 
brasen gurglings that announce the beginning of this elaborate pro. 

night hideous why well, he alwayi fumbles for bin mal 

thai 'a all. 

_ That very green Laine has astonished the " < lave of the Winds " at 
Sacramento by another brilliant emanation of his oolowal brain. Thin 
time his Parthian arrow is aimed at the practical disestablishment of the 
militi.. organization of the State, l disappointed in his abortive attempt to 
l .1 nut the pens of the press, this infatuated specimen of chrystalised idiocy 
waru> to tiing himself on the bayonets of the military. We trust this 
legislative wind-bag wiU aspire to a still higher plumule of glory, ami 
add to bis bill an amendment) abolishing plug hats and peanut stands. 
We shall never forgive Statt Senator Laine -we emphasize st.it,, for God 
forbid th 't our foreign readers should suppose that this ass hrays in our 
National Senate. We had looked forward to the luxury of holding him up 

for the derision and amusement of the World at large, and those good BOUlS 
who find their literary refreshment in the New L<tt< r in particular, but to 
have biro take the wind out of our sails by performing that service himself 
is rather hard. It is too much ! 

Mr. George C. Bromley ia a humorist: The Town Crier has been 
holding his distended sides lo ! these many years in exhausted tribute to 
the Bromley ian scintillations. But he submits that Momus himself never 

perpetrated so irresistable a stroke of native humor as the huge practical 

joke ^Ir. 1? perpetrates under the name of Street Cleaning. That this 

shining light of the Bohemian Club should wade through the mud, or 
grope through the dust, down to the City Hall once a week to draw the 
three or four thousand dollars appropriated for the cleaning of our high- 
ways, seems to us a proceeding impregnated with the very attic salt of 
humor. Socially and personally, we rather prefer the inimitable George 
to our own brother ; but pro bona publico, we beg the powers that be to 
have none of him, and to abate the infrequent rumblings of his ineffect- 
ual machine. Let us exchange the "old Brom" for the new broom that 
sweeps clean. 

" 'Wilkes' Spirit of the Times " comes to us containing the counter- 
feit presentment of a " horse, mule, and donkey, pedigrees unknown, 
served at a banquet at the Grand Hotel, at Paris," last month. We are 
further informed that the banquet was a genuine triumph for the Society 
advocating the edible advantages of these useful auimals. It is useless to 
deny it, but we yearn with a frightful intensity of appetite for the intro- 
duction of this association's ideas here. To contemplate the useful assimu- 
lation of the solemn asses of the Sacramento fog bank, or to revel over 
one's salad in the gustatory utilization of the donkeys that bray their 
damnable iterations in the Board of Supervisors* chamber, ia a pleasing 
perspective of the economy of nature in making even the most worthless 
of her creations good for something. 

Among the snow bound trains that are panting and pushing their 
exhausted way westward over the Sierra Nevada's is one that has the mis- 
fortune to contain, the telegraph informs us, that perambulating humbug 
" Weston, the Walker." Why this thread-bare and warmed-over nuisance 
should have been devil inspired with the idea of inflicting upon this com- 
munity the boredom of his windy failures we cannot comprehend. How- 
ever, we return thanks to Providence for the happy impediment that staves 
off this centipedal monstrosity for a brief season longer, and console our- 
selves with alluring visions of the imprisoned passengers turning can- 
nibals in their extremity and infallibly selecting this superfluous pedes- 
trian as their first victim. " Not any of the drumstick, please 1" 

The much belied congregation of gentlemen engaged in the con- 
tinuous rehearsal of the drama of the Fortit Thieres, in and about the 
neighborhood of California street, are considering the project of erecting 
a memorial statue of our city's late benefactor — Ralston. Apart from the 
obvious proposition that such a work ought to be the movement of our 
whole community, and not of any special interest, there are some little 
facts connected with some of those desirous to be foremost in this matter 
that emphasizes an inconsistency we shall hereafter comment upon. The 
gentlemen particularly referred to would find a brass figure of Jack Sbep- 
pard, in the act of relieving some confiding citizen of a pocket book filled 
with Ophir, very much more in their line. 

Three tame hyenas have been presented to the Prm.ce of Wales by the 
Guickwar of Baroda, we are informed by the correspondents of the Lon- 
don Court Journal. We are also advised that the Prince's appreciation of 
those charming creatures is somewhat impaired by the impossibility of 
speaking their unpronouncable names. Rather than leave our old friend 
in this dilemma, we respectfully bnt earnestly suggest that two of them 
be called respectively Fitch and Pickering. Nothing more obviously ap- 
propriate could be imagined. The third animal is what bothers us, unless 
— ah ! to be sure— -how stupid !— call him Jimmy McGinn, of course I 

The Crooked Whisky case has eventuated, at last accounts, in a 
hung jury- Sit of that astute local tribunal have decided to disagree 
with the Wance as. to the precise extent of convolution peculiar to the 
beverage under the consideration of the court. Twas ever thus, When 
did the perverse instincts of man ever permit him to acknowledge the in- 
direct and. devious, qualities of the national seducer. It never is the 
whisky. li is frequently the defective salad, and occasionally the in- 
sidious shrimp — " but those few little nips of whisky 1 Never L" 

The Egyptian Consul has brought an action against a Kearny street 
Israelite, who dispenses dyspepsia at six bits a dose, for extortion and other 
professional attributes incidental to his trade. Since when, O stranger 
from the laud of the sphinx, has the Israelite been forbidden to spoil the 
Egyptian ? 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1876. 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten. Thousand at Home 
and Abroad. 



It would seem that we have a number of dis- 
tinguished wits sparkling now in official circles. 
We have three in the Cabinet ; the .Secretary of 
the Navy, the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Postmaster General. The air is full of their bon 
■mots, and witty anecdotes, persiflage, badinage, 
pleasantries, lively sallies in all languages, and 
jeu d'esprit, whatever description of mixed drinks 
the last may be. Our court chroniclers, whose 
organs keep the names of the Cabinet, the 
Supreme Court and the entire diplomatic corps 
in type, to be ready for daily use, (vide files of 
Daily Graphic,) would lead us to believe naught 
save pearls and diamonds fall from the lips of our 
thousand and one most distinguished gentlemen 
and ladies in the city, who make every assem- 
blage illustrious by their presence, when they 
don't happen to endow the same with more bril- 
liancy than has ever before been known in the 
social annals of Washington. — Capita/. 

According to the special correspondent 

of the London Times, the performances of Mr. 
Charles Mathews, at Calcutta, are not likely to 
impress the Eastern mind very strongly — at least 
if we may judge from the demeanor of some of 
the audience recently. It was a bespeak night, 
and the Prince of Wales, the Viceroy, the 
Maharajah of Johore, and a brilliant throng of 
Europeans and natives were present. The house 
was only half full, a fact which may perhaps be 
accounted for from the fact that the prices 
charged for boxes ranged from £50 to ±!100 and 
£7 was demand for pit stall. The correspondent 
says the rajahs seemed glad when twelve o'clock 
came. 

The American Ambassador received his co- 
patriots on New Year's Day at his house from 
three to six. The present Minister does not re- 
side in Portland Place as his predecessors, Mr. 
Reverdy Johnson and Mr. C. P. Adams, did. 
His house is at 58 Great Cumberland Place, close 
to the Marble Arch, which is not quite so handy 
to the Americans' favorite hotel, the Langham, 
as the late diplomatic residence was. The process 
was a long one, lasting from reasonable hours of 
the morning till late in the afternoon. — London 
Court Journal. 

A "week or so ago the formal investiture took 
place in the Imperial palace at Berlin of Prince 
Frederick William, the eldest son of the German 
Crown Prince, as a Knight of the Order of the 
Golden Fleece. By King Alfonso's desire, Em- 
peror William conducted the investiture in the 
presence of the Spanish Ambassador, M. Mery 
y Colornb. The investiture of Prince Bismarck 
took place some time previously, but privately. 
It has not been hitherto reported in the press. 

The Ranee of Shivagunga proposes to give 
a sword of sbeel to the Prince of Wales, so beau- 
tifully tempered that it can be worn round the 
waist as a belt. This sword, moreover, is said to 
have a history, inasmuch as it once belonged to a 
Poligar chief, named Catabamanaik, who gave 
some trouble to the Madras Government towards 
the close of the last century, and who was cap- 
tured and executed in the year 1799. 

The Due de Penthievre, son of the Prince 
de Joinville, was proposed recently for promo- 
tion at the Council of the Admiralty, although 
but thirty years of age and the holder of his pres- 
ent rank for only twenty-one months. Four 
members voted for the promotion, but the major- 
ity energetically rejected the proposal 

Lew "Wallace is practicing as a landscape 
artist. He is evidently succeeding, too, for the 
Indianapolis Herald says : " His binary purple 
passes its maximum of intensity by undue re- 
ciprocal hightening in juxtaposition of its comple- 
ment." That's the way they all do at first. 

The Prince of "Wales had a magnificent re- 
ception at Benares. The population gave him a 
cordial greeting, and the illuminations and pro- 
cession are said to have afforded tfce most splen- 
did spectacle which the Prince has witnessed in 
India. 

It is announced that the Marquis of Bute's 
new work will be issued in a day or two. It re- 
counts the early days of Sir William Wallace, 
and, being a Scottish book, will be published in 
Scotland — at Paisley. 

Lord Northbrook has sent four fine elephants 
as a present to the Khedive of Egypt. They 
have been shipped by the Penisular and Oriental 
Company's steamer Mirzaporc from Calcutta to 
Suez. 

The Prince of Wales will, it is expected, ar- 
rive in England about the first week of April. 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Tuesday, Feb. 1st, 1876, and until 

further notice, Trains and Boats will 

Leave San Francisco : 

(Change of River-Steamer Landing to Market St. Wharffl 



7f\f\ A.M. (Sundays excepted), Vallcj^Stcamer (from 
• yj\J Market St. Wharf)— Connecting it Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento, 
'"making close connection at Napa with stages for So- 
noma." (Arrive 8:56 p.m.) 



8f\i\ A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
*\J\J i 311 (i i.' eiT y) for Sacramento, Marysville", Red- 
ding and Portland (b.), Colfax, Reuo, Ogden and Oma- 
ha. Conuects at Niles with train arriving at San Jose 
12:35 p.m. (Arrive 5:35 p.m.) 



8i\f\ A.M. (Sundays only), Vallejo Steamer (from 
• "v Market St. vt harf ), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga and Sacramento, and at Napa with 
stages for "Sonoma." (Arrive 8:56 P.M.) 



3(\(\ P.M. (daily) C. P. R. R. San Jose Passenger 
• v'v Train (via Uakland Ferry), stopping at all Way 



Stations. 



(Arrive 9:35 a.m.) 



Ferry), to Stockton only, connecting at Lathrop 
with Express Train for Merced, Visalia, Sumner, Calicnte 
and Los Angeles ; also at Niles with train arriving at 
San Jose 0:55 p.m. (Arrive 12:-1U p.m.) 

4f)l\ P.M. (Sundays excepted), Vallejo Steamer (from 
• W Market fct. Wharf), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Arrive 11:10a.m.) 



4f\f\ P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
• UU (from Market St. Wharf), touching at Benicia 
and Landings on the Sacramento Rh er. Taking the 
overland third class passengers to connect with train 
leaving Sacramento at 9:00 a.m., daily. 

(Arrive 8:00 p.m.) 



OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA FERRY. 

From Sax FrakcisCO to Oakland. —"Daily " — 7:00, 
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9;00, 9:30, 10:00, 11:00 a.m. ; 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30. 0:00, G:30, 7:00,8:10. 
9:20 and 10:30 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays"— 0:10 A..M. 
and 11:45 p.m. " Sundays only "—10:30 and 11:30 A.M. ; 
12:30 and 1:30 p.m. 

From Sax Francisco to Alameda.— "Daily "—7:00, 
8:00, 9:00 and 10:00 A.M. ; 12:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 0:00 and 
10:30 p.m. " Sundays only "—11:00 a.m., and 1:30 p.m. 

From Sax Fraxcisco to Ferxside.—" Daily, except 
Sundays "—7:00, 9:00 and 10:00 a.m. ; 5:00 and 10:30 p.m. 

From Sax Fraxcisco to Brooklyn.— "Daily "—7:30, 
8:30 and 9:30 a.m. ; 1:00,3:30,4:30,5:30, 0:30, 7:00, 8:10 
and 9:20 p.m. "Daily, except Sundays"— 0:10, 11:00 a.m., 
and 11:45 P.M. "Sundays only "—10:30, 11:30 A.M., and 
12:30 P.M. 

From Brooklyn to Sax Fraxcisco.— " Daily"— 6:40, 
7:40, 8:40, 9:40 and 10:40 A.M. ; 12:40, 2:40, 4:40, 5:40, 6:40, 
7:50, 9:00 and 10:10 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—5:10 
and 5:50 a.m. "Sundays only"— 11:40 A.M., and 1:25 P.M. 

From Alameda to Sax Francisco.— " Daily "—7:00, 
8:03 and 9:00 a.m. ; 3:00, 3:5S, 5:00, 0:08 and 7:00 p.m. 
"Daily, except Sundavs "— 5:00, 5:40, 11:30 a.m., and 1:30 
p.m. "Sundays only "--10:00, 11:00 a.m. ; 12:00 and 1:00 
P.M. 

From Ferxside to Sax Fraxcisco. — "Daily, except 
Sundays "--0:55, 8:00 and 11:05 a:m. ; 3:55 and 6:05 p.m. 

From Oaklaxd to Sax Fraxcisco.— "Daily "-6:50, 
7:20, 7:50, S:25, 8:50, 9:20,9:50, 10:50 and 11:50 a.m. ; 12:50, 
2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 6:30, 6:50, 7:20, 8:00, 
9:10 and 10:20 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—5:20, 6:00 
a. ii., and 1:50 p.m. "Sundays only" — 10:20 and 11:20 
a.m. ; 12:20, 1:20 and 1:35 p.m. 

OVERLAND TICKET OFFICE, at New Ferry Land- 
ing, foot of Market street. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass and Ticket Agt. 

A. N. Towxe, General Superintendent. 



S0UTHEEH PA0IPI0 KAILE0AD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION. 
WINTER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing; Sunilay. December 26th, 
1875, Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco, 
from Passenger Depot on Townsend street, between 

Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 

7 OO AM - ( daily ). for Bernal, San Miguel, Colma, 
I .\J\J B aden and San Bruno: 

Q OA A.M. (daily), for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, 
w.ov Tres Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all 
Way Stations. Sta^e connections made with this train. 

n^rC A.M. (daily), for San Mateo and Way Sta- 
»fJU tions. 



O *^r; P.M. daily (Sundays excepted), for San Jose, 
*J'***J Gilroy an d Way Stations. 

I I i S P.M. (daily), for San Jose and Way Stations. 
(l 1 ( ) P,M " ( daili ')' for San Mateo and Wav Stations. 



£5T Extra Train on Sundays Discontinued. 

A. C. BASShTT, Superintendent, San Francisco. 



LOS ANGELES DIVISION. 

Until connection is made between the Northern Divi- 
sion and Los Angeles Division, passengers for points on 
the Los Angeles Division of the road will take the cars 
of the Central Pacifie Railroad, via Oakland, at 4 p.m. 
daily for Tulare, Tipton, Delano, Poso, Lerdo, Sumner 
and Calicnte ; thence by Telegraph Stage Line via Teha- 
ehapi Pass to San Fernando (*>S miles only), and by 
Southern Pacific Railroad for Los Angeles, Compton and 
Wilmington ; for Florence, Downey, Norwalk, Costa and 
Anaheim— 100 miles from San Diego ; and for San Ga- 
briel, Monte, Puente, Spadra, Cucamonga, Colton, 
Mound City, San Gorgonia Summit and White Water, 
mak'.ng co ine.-t:on at White Water with the stages of 
the Ariz >n l and New Mexico Express Co. for Ehrenburg. 
Wickenberg, Prescott, Phoenix, Florence and Tucson. 
E. E. HEWITT, Superintendent, Los Angeles. 

J. L. WILLCUTT, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Agent, 
San Francisco. Dec. 25. 



S. F. & N. P. R- E. AND STEAMERS. 

(Change of Time.— On and after Moil- 
j day, November 15th, the steamer JAMES M. DON- 
AHUE, Captain W. Warner, will leave Green-street 
wharf, daily (Sundays excepted), at 2:30 o'clock p.m. ; 
connecting at Donahue Landing with cars for Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa, Fulton, Healdsburg, Litton's, Cloverdalcand 
intermediate places. The train will leave Cloverdale 
daily (Sundays excepted), connecting with steamer at 
Donahue for San Francisco. No more Sunday trips un- 
til further notice. Close connections made with stages 
on the arrival and departure of trains for Sonoma City, 
the Geysers, Skaggs, Mark West and Highland Springs. 
Also, Point Arena, Sebastopol, bodega, Duncan's Mills, 
Fisk's Mills, Gualala, Clear Lake, Lakeport, Ukiah, Eure- 
ka, Mendocino, Pine Flat, Petrified Forest and (Quicksilver 
mines. Freight received from 7 a.m. till 4 p.m. For all 
information, apply at General Office, 426 Montgomery st. 
P. DONAHUE, President. 

F. H. GERDES, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

General Office : 436 Montgomery st., S. F. Sept. 18. 



ALFRED PARAF. 

Analytical anil Consulting' Chemist. 
Assaying of all kinds of Ores, etc. Quantitative 
and Qualitative Analysis made at short notice. A 
Specialty made of Bleaching, Dyeing, and Printing of 
every description of Textile Fabrics and Yarns. Office — 
Room 1, over London and San Francisco Bank, corner 
Leidesdorff and California streets. Laboratory— At 
Golden City Chemical Works, corner 7th and Townsend 
streets, San Francisco, California. Office Hours : Every 
day from 12 to 2 o'clock, where MR. PARAF is ready to 
negotiate for the sale of his numerous Patented Inven- 
tions. Balance of time at Laboratory. MR. ALFRED 
PARAF is* a Pupil and Scientific Associate of Dr. Paul 
Schutzenberger, Professor of Chemistry and Chief of the 
Chemical Department of the College of France, Paris. 

REFERENCES (by permission): Milton S. Latham, 
Manager London and San Francisco Bank (Limited) ; J. 
C. Duncan, Sec. Pioneer Land and Loan Association ; A. 
J. Bryant, Vice-President State Investment Insurance 
Coninanv ; H. P. Wakelee, Manager Golden Citv Chemi- 
cal Works; W. F. McNutt, M.D. ; Dr. Charles F. Chan- 
dler, Dean of Columbia College Mining School, New 
York City ; Dr. Paul Schutzenberger, College of France, 
Paris. Jan. 23. 



OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Reg-nlar St earners to Portland, leaving 
San Franciseo weekly — Steamers J. L.STEPHENS, 
OR1FLAMME, and A J AX, connectinjj with steamers to 
SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O. and C. R. R. Co. and 
Oregon C. R. R. Co. through Willamette, Umpqua, and 
Rogue River Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points on 
the O. and C. R. R. sold at reduced rates. Sailing Days : 
Saturdays at 10 o'clock a. m. 
June 14. WM. NORRIS, Agent, 210 Battery street. 



JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

The attention of Sportsmen is invited 
to the following Ammunition, of the best quality, 
now in general use throughout England, India and the 
Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof Central Fire Percus- 
sion Caps; Chemically -prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wad- 
ding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Cartridges, for Pin-fire and Cen- 
tral-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for kill- 
ing game *at long distances, and every description cf 
Sporting Ammuuition. Sold by all gunmakers and deal- 
ers in gunpowder. FREDERICK JOYCE & CO. , 

Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Aug. 29. 57 Upper Thames street, Londun. 



REDUCTION OF RATES OF FREIGHT TO 
PORTLAND. 

Freig-bton Merchandise to Portlandou 
Oregon Steamship Company's steamers REDUCED 
TWO DOLLARS PER TON until "further notice. . 
May 20 WM. NORRIS, Agent. 



TEETH SAVED! 

ill ins; Teeth a Specially. — Great patience 

extended to children. Chloroform administered, 
and teeth skillfully extracted. Alter ten years constant 
practice, I can guarantee satisfaction. Prices moder- 
ate- Oftlce— 1^0 Sutter street, above Montgomery. 
June 0. DR. MORFFEW, DentiBt. 



0. SLAIN. fi. H. WINCHESTER. 

MAIN & WINCHESTER. 

annfuctnrer* Hud Ini)>ortt-i-M of Harness. 



M" 



_ Saddles, Bridles, Whips, Collars, Snddlery Ware, 
etc., Nos. 214 and :il*» Battery street, San Francisco. 
N. B. — A good assortment of Concord Stage Harness 
constantly on hand. Sept. 12. 



JOSEPH CURLE, 

Accountant, 

513 lUontsomery street. 
San Francisco. Cal. [Feb.' 



TAKE THE OLD LINE 

For Enreka, Hnmboldt Bay, arriving 1 
in twenty -four hours. Only one night at sea. The 
staunch iron steamship PELICAN, 800 tons, Jas. Carroll 
Commander, will leave for the above ports, from Folsom 
street wharf, on WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12, at 9 o'clock a. m. 
BEN HOLLADAY, JUN., Agent, 
May 8. 123 California street. 



Feb, 5, 1876.1 



CAUFORNIA ADVERTISER 



il 



NOTAB1LIA. 



The Prince ol Wales, during bit Baal [ndU tour, virited >m exhibition 
•f « il.l nmmals, »ml t'..i i!ii- he was itrongly 

it now he li.' it.. I the folks 

too girts. There ii no par* 

iHjniirction between our friend Wales snd our Mend De La boon- 

that the] are both ffrai man. If ypu doubt the proposition, 

drop in at the Latter'* mammoth o-tabliiihiueali, Jaafcaazi, below I; 

fnr yourself. 



• " Why do yon not ta_n vine with your dinner, Minnie !" uskr<t ;i gen- 
tleman who gat near :i little girl. " "Tanse [ doesn't like it." "Hut take 
a tittle then, my child, f"r your Btomach's *:tke,'" he urqed. " 1 ain't got 
no 'toinmick'. ache!" indignantly responded the little _____ in the most 
emphatic manner. The most chemically pure aa well as invariably unex- 
ceptional wines and liquors can be had of George Hamlin, 412 .Market 

|t--Ct, ^ 

A Washington man who was lately u>e<l as a reference to establish a 

Friend's character did it thus comprehensively : " I am happy t>< inform 
you that Mr. Smith stands at the very top of respectability here, tie owns 

a hat horse, a New York judge, ami intends to Steal the first railroad he 
wul loose." 

An enterprising friend suggested to us to have our first Centennial 

Issue in the National colors. Tin- idea was neat hut impossible. We have 
DO white ink. anil could not he blue on such a day, so we concluded to 

only have tli read. We wish we could print in 

letters of gold the merit of Bradley & Rttlofson's new convex pictures. 

They are the most admirable aa well aa flattering style of photograph yet 
invented. 

" So you wouldn't take me to be twenty ?" said a. rich heiress to an 
Iri^h gentleman, while dancing the polka. "What would yon take me 

for. then'.'" " For better or worse." replied the son of the Emerald Isle. 
He also concluded t" lake her to (A>rville'_ Saddle Hock Oyster Saloon 
after the party and enjoy some of the most appetizinyly cooked oysters in 
the city. His elegant new place is on Pine street, above Montgomery. 

A German gentleman stopped a bustling waiter who asked him what 
he would be helped to next. " Oh," replied the German, " I'll dank yon for 
von more of dem leetle holes." One sucking pig had already disappeared 
by his successful attack. 

Her smile is sunlight, ami her laugh And as she took my over-coat 
That sunlight set to tune ; To hang it on the rack, 

Her lips the honey bee might quaff, She said, " I'm sure this work of art 
And dream of buds in June. Was purchased of Van Schaack." 

Call and see his superb line of new spring goods just opened. Opposite 

the Plaza, 

"Sir, yon are a political thing ! — a perambulating monument of mean- 
no- a bankrupt in everything but cheek !" " Boss, I don't understand 
German, but I'll drink with you !" The difficulty was settled on that 
basis. It is needless to remark that the fluid that smothered away this 
little unpleasantness came from F. & P. J. Cassin, No. 523 Front street. 

A blind mendicant wears this inscription around his neck, " Don't be 
ashamed to give only a sou. I can't see." 

Gambetta was called a " dried idiot " in the French Assembly recently. 
If the dominant party at California's Capitol ever get to calling pet names, 
what a lovely contribution to slang literature there will be. Uambetta's 
stylish parisian turnout is ornamented by a fac simile of the superb set of 
harness made by Main & Winchester, 214 Battery street, for Senator 
Jones. 

" The bully boy with, the glass eye " is no longer spoken of, but the 

5>erson who obtains his spectacles and optical requirements from Midler's, 
Montgomery street, opposite the Occidental, is supposed to know a thing 
or two. Muller's Brazilian Pebble Glasses are the very best ever manu- 
factured. Look at them. 

The American Rochefoucauld says women, like the plants in the 
woods, derive their softness and tenderness from the shade, and yet never 
like to confess to the shady side. 

The pickpockets have been complaining of the late cold weather. 
They say that while it lasted every man kept his hand in bis own pockets- 
It is enough to compel any man to put his hands in his pockets to exam- 
ine the superb stock of Pianos and Melodeons on band at Wm. Badger's 
popular store, No. 13 Sansome street. 

Anna Dickinson baa recovered enough to lecture, but not enough to 
pjay. A women of her age has got to be mighty sick to give up the luxury 
of abusing people. The luxury that no one would be willing to give up is 
a bottle of wine selected from the superb stock of A. P. Hotaling, 431 
Jackson street. 

The first lady lawyer admitted to the bar in America has just got her 
first client. The client is very youthful, and she is doing as well as could 
be expected. 

Hekeyan Bey, an Egyptian, and the author of a theory of the Great 
Pyramid, has just died. He was the only man who ever knew who built 
the thing. Everybody knows, however, that the very place of places to 
get the best and most appetizing lunch in the city is at the Criterion, No. 
210 Kearny street. 

Brigham Young's health is greatly improved. It takes four of his 
wives to kick him out of bed now. Since he has promised to order here 
the furniture of his decidedly extensive establishment from N. P. Cole's, 
No. 220 Bush street, peace reigns within the wigwam of the muchly-mar- 
ried prophet. 

"What is he ?" "A lawyer, dem him." " Much biz ?" " He never 
had a brief in his life." "Well, don't blame him, for it ain't right to abuse 
a man without a cause." " Let's drink." And they took some Napa Soda 
all round. 



A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF 

THE S. F- STOCK AND EX- 

CHANGE BOARD. 

VOl i in t \ / - - - - ptMfcfon*. 

t . II . BOA 1 W, A - . | (w-PrM't. 

P. /. I WTOJi Secretary, 

It. ii. COIT Chairman. 

Austin, Alexander 

Budd, W., 440 California el. 

Burling &Bro SSfl California at, 

Boewell, 8. B 803 California _t. 

Cahil', E 'iti; Montgomery et. 

Charles, H. A 408 Montgomery at. 

Copo, Uhler & Co Montgomery »t 

Coll Deane No. 10, Nevada Block. 

Eyre.E E 811 Montgomery at. 

Glover, G. F. M 480 California fit, 

Greenebaum, J 418 California et. 

Hassey, F. A 402 Montgomery Bt. 

Hart, Henry 418 Montgomery at. 

Hall, Ed. T 410 California ft. 

Herr, J. J 411 California et. 

Hooker, B. C 435 Montgomery et. 

Jones, J.H 509 California st. 

Keene, I. R -135 California Bt. 

King, Jos. L 400 Jtf California st. 

Lynch, J HO Leideeilort- at. 

Latham, Jas. H -ill California et. 

Marina, E. J. De S., with I. Glazier 

& Co 420 Montgomery si. 

Noble, H. H 436 California et. 

Peckham, E. P 413 California at. 

Parker, W. C 113 Lcidesdorff et. 

Perry, Jr., Jno 100 Leidesdorffst. 

Shawhan, J. E 432 Montg'y Bt. 

Sherwood, B. F 40_# California et. 

Schmieden, Kochstadter & Co 

401 California Bt. 

Smiley, G. W 444 California et. 

Shotwell, J. M 311 Montgomery Bt. 

lurnbull, W 410J. California Bt. 

Wakefield, S B 503 California et. 



A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF 
THE PACIFIC 8TCCK EX- 
CHANGE BOARD. 

/:..'. n n n\\ i\ President, 

OJBO. 8. ihuhh: - . i ,,,-r,rHt. 

0. *'. UlCKOJk Treasurer, 

I. ./. MOVZJfBB Secretary, 

JOB. ii I. in: x Chairman, 

Baldridgo, M 

Barton, Robert 

Berry, F. G 418 Montgomery it. 

Bourne, J. B llBHulleck Bt 

■ DeGreayor. 8 -'Kim Banaomeat 

Dodge, George 8 

' Fin lay son, J. R 1'nciflc Exchange 

Building, Hulk'ck street 

Hickox, A. A Halteck'a Building. 

Hearst, George 

Hoight, IraG 421 Montgomery et. 

Hunt, J. L 300 Sanaome st. 

Lent, William M 

Marks, Joseph 

Mauldin, Hugh 

Moulder, A. J 

Martin, M. S .'...307 California et. 

McCoppin, F 320 Montgomery et. 

Moroney, Paul 8 Halleck Bt. 

Nash, J 405 J$ California st. 

Neal, tharlcs S 

Palmer, E. F 413 California et. 

Plummer, H. W 

Riolte, E.N 

Rich. Dave 422 Montgomery st. 

Sanborn, T. G 

Sutro, Gustave 

Swift, Frank 

Smiley, T. J. L 314 Montgomery at. 

Taylor, A. C 411 H CiU'a at., room 2. 

Tyng, Geo 309 Cal'a at., rooms 8-9. 

Van H ess, Thomas C 

Willard, G H 30!) California et. 

Walker, J. W. & Co. - . . 303 Montg'y et. 



TAMALPAIS HOTEL, SAN RAFAEL. 

The above nameil hotel will be opened to the public on or 
about the first of May. Parties desiring rooms for the season can make appli- 
cation for the same either by letter or to the undersigned at the hotel. 

April 24. SAJ1UKL HUBBARD, Proprietor. 

ART ASSOCIATION. 

The Ninth Exhibition of the San Francisco Art Association , 
comprising 120 Beautiful Works of Art, by Local and Foreign Artists, is now 
open to the public from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Admission, 25 cents. Jan. 8. 

WIILIAM HABNEY, 

Notary Pnblic and Commissioner of Deeds, northwest cor- 
ner of Montgomery and Sacramento streets, office of Madison & Burke, San 
Francisco. Jan. 8. 



J. B. Chapman.] 



[Established in 1859.] [Jons Bauer. 

CHAPMAN & 00., 

Contractors for Night Work. ---Vaults, Cesspools, Sewers, 
Yards, etc. , cleaned. Sewers repaired and properly laid. Office : 313 Dupont 
street, between Bush and Sutter, San Francisco. Nov. 20. 



ENGLISH BRANCHES, 

Together with French Language and Literature, taught by 
Prof. Dietz, Ph. D. (University of Fiance). Holder of a First-Grade Teacher's 
Certificate issued by the City and County Board of Examination, Department of Pub- 
lic Schools, San Francisco. 946 Folsom street, near Fifth. Jan. 1. 

R. H. Lloyd.] LLOYD & NEWLANDS, [F. G. Nhwlandh 

Attomeys-at-__aw. Offices: Rooms 9 to 13, Nevada Block, 
first fioor. Dec. 11. 

Fred'k A. Elliott. 



John S. Bugbee. 



Chas. Willmot. 
SWAN BREWERY COMPANY, 

Brewers and Bottlers of the Swan Ales and Porter. 
Brewery, Bottling Establishment and Main Office, Southeast corner Fifteenth 
and Dolores streets, San Francisco, May 29. 

SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. 

Now on exhibition, the "Capture of the Serapls," by Mr. 
James Hamilton, together with a choice collection of Eu-opean Pictures. Ad- 
mission, 25 cents. Jan. 1. 

________ 

■637 SACRAMENTO STREET, 

J BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



JBRTJCE, 



Wm. H. Stewart.] STEWART & GREATHOTJSE, [0. R. Greatiiousb. 

Attorneys-at-__aw, Booms 42. 43, 45 and 46, 'Nevada 
Block, San Francisco. Will practice in all the Courts of California, Nevada 
and the Territories. Dec. 11. 

C. L. Crackbon.] C- A. MBEBOCK & CO- «■ A. Murdoch. 

Job Printers, Successors to M. ». Carr <fc Co., No. 532 Clay 
street. San Francisco, Cal- Feb. 3. 

STEINWAY PIANOS, 

The Best Beyond All Bi-pute, 

At Gray's New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street. 

[July 31.] 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1*76. 



UES OP THE DAY— Continued. 

quarter.— —That Cummings is more inclined to seclusion than usual.— 
That the City Fathers projiose to tax the town to macadamise Main street. 
^— That H. A. Booth is going to be Chief Superintendent of the Cement 
"Works.— That the nice telegraph operator intends changing his board- 
ing house. That he intends to have the water laid on to the office, instead 
of going through the mud for it. — —That the "Black Cook" stock is 
rising.— That D. McKenzie is going to invest in a millinery estabUsh- 
ment.— That the Roberts family run the Moore & Cummings Tannery. 
^— That Campbell has economical reasons for boarding at one house and 

sleeping at another. That when J. R. Brown visits San Francisco he 

dines at the What Cheer House and picks his teeth in front of the Palace 
Hotel.— That Stewart's bark is ever mistaken for a dog's;, because every 
one knows it is a tanners.— That Dames Barry knows the way to the 

Arsenal. -^That L. B. Mezner is the literary light of Benicia. That 

C. H. Pope intends taking " Holy Orders. "-^That M. Heenan will ever 
allow the race of " Benicia Boys" to die out— That M. M. Sweeney 
likes cold weather.— — ThatSamuel Dalton is a public benefactor. ——That 
W. H. Foreman will ever admit that his fashionable paterns are " behind 
the times. "-—That G. W. Stevens understands Pedro. That Reed 
would like to give him a few private lessons.— —That J. J. Jacobs boasts 
the soundness of his understanding.— That W. Durnen ever makes a 
misfit.-^— That Charlie Quigg is a good detective. That the " Boys in 
Blue" ever get ahead of him.— That James Ewing is the leader of 
fashions in Benicia. 

St. Helena Lies. — It is not true that E. M. York is writing a volume 
on St. Helena Roses. ^— That Robert Hastie is famous for his deUberate 
gait.^— That J. S. Clow is going to remove his studio to the " Mount." 
— That J. E. Straus enjoys Saturday afternoon.—— That J. M. Brown 
would make an excellent " apothecary " in the play of Romeo and Juliet. 
—That C. M. Warren has a new sketch of " That Old Oak Tree." — — 
That W". A. Bruce is the crack marksman of Napa county. ^— That J. G. 
Francis' good temper is owing' to his robust health. -^— That F. A. Sage 
hides more defects than any other, man in St. Helena. ^^That Frank 
Hoffman wears a tag on his breast to enable his friends to identify him. 
— — That R. B. Hurlburt ever alludes to a "Sweet Singer."— That S. 
Solamonson is a philosopher.^— That William "Veasy is going to apply 
for a patent for a new style of headdress.*^— That Garrett Faley spreads 
a most attractive lunch table.— That D. K. Rule is a lover of botany. 
^— That C. E. Davis is going to start a candy factory. 

Calistoga Lies. — It is not true that A. C. Thompson is the " Mul- 
doon " of Calistoga. ^— That W. O. Irons is often imposed upon.— That 
E. B. Badlam is going into the sheep raising business. —— That A. 0. Pal- 
mer is going to purchase a wig to give him a more impressive appearance. 
—That C. Evans will retire from the show business after this summer. 

That M. Friedburg thinks there is no humor in calling him " Count 

of Calistoga."-^ That H. H. Mitchell is studying the classics. ^— That 
Joe Enos is a devout Spiritualist.— That Williams & Metzler were sin- 
cere when they offered our " Liar " a free ride. " " -That H. Getleson has 
a fine military carriage.-^— That W. F. Fisher has a horse that lives well 
on one straw a day.-^ That A. P. Hoddy is ever accused of riding a 
"Hobby-Horse."— —That J. A, Cbeesbrosighs for summer. — That Geo. 
Schoenwald keeps a clerk to remind him when it is " bath time."— — That 
J. H. M. Madden knows vines are more profitable than cinnabar. 

San Rafael Lies. — It is not true that the Liar don't like San Ra- 
fael.— That it is too dull.^— That Schneider got swindled on his 
cigars. ^— That H. F. Nye thinks himself the handsomest man in San 
Rafael. —That J. Duncan never plays bean poker. ^— That Trumbull 
has had his hair cut— That Waite is afraid to go out of doors at 
night.— —That Jno. Ward keeps straight whisky.^— That Pete Crane 
comes to the City too often.^— That H. Wilkins is despondent over his 
moustache. ■ -That it wont grow worth a cent. That Dubois is a 
butcher.^— -That Geo. Davis is in love. ^— That Dougherty won't collect 
of his friends. —That Billy Cross won't trust. ^— That Pratt is the 
Grossest man in the county. 

Brooklyn Lies.— It is not true that Harrison, of Tubbs' Hotel, will 
lithograph " Lo the poor Indian," together with other novelties lately re- 
ceived by him. That William says there is more money in it than in le- 
gitimate printing. That the first copies of " Lo, the poor Indian " are 
already spoken for by Messrs. Blankman, Martin, Parker, Kingsbury and 
other guests of Tubbs' Hotel. That the second edition of this beautiful 
chromo will be distributed (free gratis) among the little folks of Tubbs' 
Hotel by the gay and festive William. That copies will be disposed of at 
panic prices- on the Oakland boats, provided arrangements can be made 
with Leland Stanford. 

[For balance of "Lies" see Postscript] 

Next week our Itinerant Liar will visit Grass Valley, Nevada City, North. 
Bloomfield, North San Juan and Truckee. 



THE STOCK MAEKET. 

There ia not much change to note in the attitude of the stock market 
since our last issue, if we except a gradual and substantial stiffening of 
the line as a whole. The Consolidated Virginia mine will, it is now 
generally understood, pay an increased dividend the month after the one 
now immediately due is disbursed. The amount of ore now taken out 
under the improved facilities by this mine is something remarkable. 

The Gould and Curry mine has met with a genuine and substantial 
streak of luck. The water, which interfered with its operations at the 
1700 foot level, has been thoroughly and completely drained by its finding 
an outlet into the cross-cutting at the 2,200 foot level of the Savage mine, 
which is only a hundred and sixty feet from the Gould and Curry shaft at 
that point. The result is that the latter mine has been entirely relieved 
of water, while as a necessary sequence the Savage shaft is filled up to 
the 1,900 foot level. 

We see no reason to discourage the universal prediction of a " booming" 
market during the next few weeks, and eastern capital seems to be steadily 
coming over for investment. So marked has this moyement been of late 
that it is thought the arrival of the five snow bound trains will give an im- 
petus of itself to certain stocks that are now prime favorites on the other 
side of the continent. 

An Oakland father wants to know "what will keep a respectable, 
but poor young man from hanging round the front a£ the house f Tell 
him the girl is sitting on the back fence. 



ART JOTTINGS. 

The eaSribition of the Art Association closes to-night to the gen- 
eral public. Un Monday evening, however, there will be an easel reception 
at the gallery ; that is, all the local artists, who desire to do so. will have i 
the privilege of exhibiting one or more pictures on an easel, instead of on 
the walk, as usual. The paintings now on view will remain as they are, 
and the additions will be new work from the studios. None but members ] 
will be admitted. Owing to the inclemency of the weather at the open- I 
ing reception, it is predicted that the closing will be a notable affair. The 
sale of Hill's " Yosemite" has been the event in art circles most talked of 
during the week. The daily papers announce, without reserve, that the 
price paid was §10,000. This is possibly a truth, but probably a falsehood,,, 
as is generally the case when large paintings are sold here, and it seems 
hard to see why the public should be deceived regarding the price paid for 
a picture-any more than for other commodities. It is true an artist is not 
obliged to say what he received for a picture, nor is he justified in saying 
that he received this large sum, when it . is well known to many that he 
did not ; but the harm comes of the lie being spread abroad by the press, 
thereby deceiving artists elsewhere as to what pictures are worth here. 
As well might the papers publish that the product of any other branch of 
skilled labor was bringing here four or five times what it would at the 
East or in Europe. This question of the prices of pictures is getting to be 
a serious one, and artists and dealers will find themselves in very deep 
water if they persist in deceiving the public. 

Next week is anuounced as the last of the exhibition of Mr. Hamilton's 
" Capture of the Serapis." 

At Morris, Schwab & Kennedy's, Hahn has out a sparkling clear study ; 
it is just to the life in all respects. At the same place, Rix has a large 
wood and water scene, which fails to do him justice. 

Another large painting (the one referred to last week) by Bierstadt has 
been Die attraction of the week at the Art Rooms. It is a weird scene, 
full of poetic feeling, and of an uncomfortably warm tone. It is, of 
course, highly finished, as is all his work. The picture comes from Eng- 
land. This would have been considered a curious source for one of Bier- 
stadt's pictures to come from a few years ago, but things have changed 
somewhat. The noble patrons of American art in England are not as 
plentiful as they were a few years ago, and the consequence is that the 
works of noted artists, which a few years ago were eagerly sought after 
in the East and Europe, now find their way out here for a market. 

Hamilton, the marine painter, whose picture of an incident in Sir 
W alter Scott's " Antiquary" made the artist's fame twenty-five years 
ago, is now at room 85, Cosmopolitan Hotel, where lovers of art may see 
the best collection of marine studies ever shown in this city. 



[communicated.] 
"Wade's Opera House. — The Fabbri Opera Troupe gave a closing per- 
formance of Verdi's Ernani on Sunday evening. The house was overflow- 
ing with a delighted audience. Madame Fabbri deserves this support for 
the pains she evidently took to make the execution as perfect as possible. 
She was a host in herself apparently. The event of the evening was the 
first appearance of Mr. Jacob Mueller, in the character of " Don Carlos." 
San Franciscans will scarcely have forgotten his fine presence and rich 
baritone voice. His middle notes are particularly soft and melodious. His 
natural rendering of declamatory music more than once brought down 
the house. Mr. Habelman sang better than he sometimes does. The 
trios and quartettes were particularly effective, and the chorus quite satis- 
factory. In the second act there was a delightful ballet. Miss Von Dah- 
leen and Senorita Christina appeared as principals, to which position both 
possess the very highest claim. Madame Fabbri is much to be congratu- 
lated in her new house. Its acoustic properties are excellent, and there is 
good accommodation for her many admirers. Supported as she was on 
Sunday night, Madame Fabbri's artistic taste and ambition afford a more 
than sufficient guarantee for entertainments of the highest class. We 
wish her every success. To-morrow (Sunday) evening will be presented 
Joseph in Eyypt — a historical and dramatic opera, in three acts, by Michael. 
Mr. Jacob Mueller will make his second appearance. There will be new 
scenery and a grand triumphal procession, in which a number of camels 
will take part. Snowjlake continues to draw good audiences. The matinees 
on Saturday and Wednesday were very large. The ballet of flowers and 
enchantment is nearly equal to anything we have seen in the palmiest 
days of ballet at "Her Majesty's," in London. This is no doubt high 
praise, but it is just. Mesdames Lapo, Rita, Priola, and Christina succes- 
sively pleased the spectators — indeed a more exquisite combination of 
beauty, color, and motion can scarcely be conceived. Few persons who 
only saw the imperfect representation on the first night would now recog- 
nize the entertainment, it is so essentially changed and improved. One 
now forgets the tediousness of some portions of the dramatic dialogue in 
the naivette of Miss Pixley, the charming ballads of Miss Montague, and 
the succession of enchanting scenes. The continuation of full houses not 
only proves the soundness of the public taste, but that it grows on what it 
feeds. Mdlle. Cora Adriana has been unable to appear for some days in 
consequence of illness. She is better, and will appear to-night. Miss 
Kingsbury, the new attraction, has arrived from the East. 

FOB ARIZONA AND MEXICAN POSTS. 

For Cape St. Lncnft, iTI:iz!i(I:iEt. l^n I*:iz. 4kU3i>iiium nsttl the Colorado 
River, touching at Magtlalena Bay, should sufficient inducement offer —The 

Steamship Captain, will leave for the above ports on 

at la o'clock M., from Folsom-strcet Wharf, connecting 

at che Mouth of the Colorado with the Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
Steam Navigation Company for all points on the River. Through Bills of Lading 
will be tarnished and none others signed. Freight will be received on Monday, 
27thlnstant. No freight received for Mexican Ports alter Friday noon, and Bills of 
Lading for those ports must be accompanied by Custom-house and Consular 
Clearances. For freight or passage apply to 
March 6. B. M. HARTSHORNE. 610 Front street. 

G. H. MUMM & CO.'B CHAHP AGNES. 

Dry Yerzenay, quarts and pints; Extra Dry. quarts and 
pints. RUHL BROS., Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 522 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco. Dec 18. 

B. F. Flint. Flint, Blxly & Co.] [J. Lee. D. W. Folgeb. 
A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Grit tiers. Packers and Dealers in WOOI, corner of Battery 
and Greenwich streets, San Francisco. ■ J an. 29. 

15,000 TONS PEE MONTH 
f Black Diamond and other 9ft. Diablo Coals received and 

for sale by [May 23.] P. B. CORNWALL, Prea't B. D. Coal Mining Co. 



o 



i\ , s »o; | 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



L8 



VERSES FOR THE KITCHEN. 
Uncle Saui Ward. "Kiaffo! the Lobby," who fa eagoodai 
keii a i written the followin U of true imwtrdneee : 

uioa with nbnoBt 
Aii-l pal mini mum your roasted lamb on. 
In dn "I'u aalad mind thii la* 

With two urd yolki m m that* raw. 

Boaal Hal a ith rich - f rta ; 

An. I pickled maflhroanu, t.«>, ol 

Rnaal port mu apple aaoee pael doubt, 

N " H.tuiK-t" with the I'liru.- left out. 

Your mutton<chopa with paper oover, 

And nuke than unbar brown all orer. 

BroU lightly your beefsteak t*< fry it 

Annie* contempt of Christian diet. 

To roi moll am 

Job) iplil '-in down the book and broil Vm. 

It gives true epicures' tha vapors 

To - ■ broiled mutton minus capers. 

The oook d arty oufihw 

Who serves roaat fowls with tasteless staffing, 

Sni.lt- raquira egg ; i "'l biscuit powder 

Dont pol fat para in your clam chowder, 

Bgg sauce taw make it right, alas - 

I good with bluefiah or with lnuw. 

Nice oyster sance gives test to cod— 

A bah] whan fresh, bo bast ■ god. 

Hut one nii,-ht rhyme for weeks this way, 

And still have lota of things to say. 

And bo Ml close] for, reader mine, 

This is about the hour 1 dine. 



THE SPIRIT OF 1876. 



The little stir which has been agitating the community with a sense 
of something agreeable about to happen has finally settled itself into a 
pleasant fact, via., ths grand ball to be given at Onion Hall on the 22d of 
February by the ladies of the Centennial Commission. It is written in 
the chronicles of all time that whereas the fighting and the glory have been 
given t" man as his part, genuine love of country has burned its purest 
ore in 1 1 > * ■ heart of woman. Therefore it is not to be wondered at that in 
this hundredth :umi\ cr-:iry of n wondrous year it has been left to woman's 
hand to stir the dying embers of patriotism with a flame of enthusiasm. 
Tins ( lentennial ball will be the first step taken in California to bring her 
people to a realization that it is just one hundred years since the year 
177'i, and whether it will be through patriotism, or because every one is 
going to be there, every one wants to go. It promises to be one of the 
most brilliant affairs ever held in the country, and if our grandfathers 
could look into the ball on that night, they woidd doubtless have a hard 

time in ol Bine between the stiff brocades, the powdered hair, the square 

shoes and buckles of 177<> which will be represented on the floor on the 
23d, and the Bheath dresses, Grecian knots, and elaborate simplicity of 
1876, which will, of course, hold its own on that night, too. We advise 
those who intend participating in this elegant affair to make early applica- 
tion for tickets, as the ladies of the Committee who have taken charge of 
the disposal of them find them going off very fast. The seal of fashion is 
a magic one, hence the rush for the Centennial ball. Tickets can be had 
of any of the following ( 'ommittee for -S10 in gold: Mrs. Wm. Ashburner, 
Mrs. Joseph Austin, Mrs. L. L. Baker, Mrs. Gen. W. W. Burns, Mrs. 
Howard B. Coit, Mrs. D. D. Cotton, Mrs. S. B. Cooper, Mrs. Isaac E. 
Davis, Mrs. Peter Donahue, Mrs. Joseph Godcheaux, Mrs. Col. G. W. 
Granniss, Mrs. Wm. A. Grattan, Mrs. Wm. M. G-win, Miss Gertie 
Benchley, Miss Lillie Buckbee, Miss Emma Cole, Miss Laura DeRussy, 
Miss Nopie MoDougaL Mrs. Lucien Hermann, Mrs. James T. Hoyt. 
Mrs. Milton S. Latham, Mrs. Charles A. Low, Mrs. Frank McCoppin, 
Mrs. Donald McLennan, Mrs. Thomas Morrison, Mrs. Gen. J. M. Scho- 
field, Mrs. Wm. H. Sears, Mrs. Seixas Solomons, Mrs. Henry Wether- 
bee, Mrs. Dr. J. D. Whitney, Mrs. Wm. A. Woodward, Miss Anna J. 
Perry, Miss Mary Seawell, Miss Quica H. Smith, Miss Fannie Washing- 
ton, Miss Maria K. Woods ; Mrs. Frederick MacCrellish, President ; 
Mrs. < 'ornelius Cole, Vice-President ; Mrs. Louis Sloss, Treasurer; Mrs. 
A. V. Wakeman, Secretary. Continental dress is desired by as many as 
feel disposed. 

REMOVED. 

James G. Steele & Co., the well known and popular Chemists and 
Apothecaries, have removed their entire stock and fixtures from their old 
stand to their new, elegant and commodious store, No. 316 Kearny street, 
east side, between Pine and Bush. Their large and well assorted stock 
of Pure Drugs and Chemicals, Genuine Patent Medicines, etc., has lately 
received important additions from the Eastern States and Europe, and 
their attention will be devoted to keeping, at all times, the variety neces- 
sary to a first-class drug store. The Prescription Department will be un- 
der the charge of skilled and experienced dispensers, and Physicians can 
rest assured that, as in the past, strict integrity, neatness and dispatch 
will be observed in compounding prescriptions. A new and well-arranged 
Laboratory, perfect in all its details, is located in the basement, where the 
manufacturing operations pertaining to a large business will be carried on. 
Physicians, and others at a distance, ordering goods, can depend upon hav- 
ing their orders filled with the same regard to quality and price as though 
obtained in person. We wish our friends, Messrs. Steele & Co., the suc- 
cess their new location invites. 



Mr. Harry Haskins, a veteran printer and wielder of the foreman 
rule, is dead. Mr. Haskins was a '49er, and for the last twenty-five 
years officiated as printer and foreman on local papers, particularly the 
Bulletin. Having accumulated some means, he invested the same in 
stocks, and became wealthy by their rise. He then retired from active 
business. He goes to his well-earned rest, followed by the sincere and 
heartfelt regrets of troops of friends. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOB WtKK KNDINOFEB. 4, 187o. 






. 

AdvUlOO 

Anuuutu 

All- 



ui KUk , 



in I lal . . 
Belcher 
I.' -: .\ i 

tool 

!-.■ 

Buckeya 

Bullion 

■■ On i k 

Polw 

Clialli ngs 

I'd. .Il.tr 



Don Virginia.... 

California 

Caledonia, ...... 

ipolltan . .. 

Cow Con 

> onfldt nee 

Condor 

Cabinet 

Dayton] 

Defiance 

Empire Mill 

BunkaCon 

Bxche tucr 

Bldorado South . 

Eclipse 

Edinburgh 

Europe 

Bast Ophir 

Globe 

Could >v Curry .. 

Oloocoe Con 

Gold Run 

Gila 

'Golden Chariot. 

Glasgow 

Hale & Norcross. 

Hussey 

[topenal 

International . .. 

Mu Elmore 

Jackson 

Justice 

Jefferson 

Julia 

Jenny Glynn 

Knickerbocker', . 

Ken tuck 

K. K. Con 

Kossuth 

Kclscy 

Lady Bryan 

Leopard 

Leo 

* Lady Wash'n . . . 

Leviathan 

Mexican 

Monumental .... 
'Meadow Valley. 

Midcs 

Miller 

'Mint 

Mansfield 

Marks & Darrow. 

•New York 

Nevada 

"North Carson .. 

Niagara 

*Ne\v Coso 

Northern Belle . . 

Newark 

Ophir 

Overman 

Original Gold Hill 

Occidental 

Pioneer 

•Piocbe 

Prospect 

Pacitic ?.. 

Poorman 

Phil Sheridan . .. 

'Prussian 

Panther 

Rye Patch 

Rock Island 

Raymond & Ely. 
Seg. Caledonia . . 
South California 

'Savage 

Sierra Nevada... 
Seg. Belcher .... 

Silver Hill 

South Silver Hill 

*Succor 

South Chariot. . . 

Safe Deposit 

Union Con 

Utah 

* YVoodville* 

West Comstock.. 

Wells Fargo 

West Belcher..,. 
Yellow Jacket... 



■■I 

H 
t 

::' 

m 

m 

» 

>-• 
«sj 

M 

420 
Hi 
»S 

~li 
221 



MOgOAY. 

a u. r. M. 



i-j:. 

35 



28J 



09 | 105 



15i 



U3 



,.. r * 



I] 

21 



2* 



ioj 



107 



. M 



M) 



■OT Tli . 



r . , «.. I- w 



123 



121 



mi 



123 



151 



12J 



59*. 



163 



12i 



The Stocks above marked thus * are Assessed. 



2 

n 



s 



24| 



82J 
J 

ir,j 

J 
» 

a 

i* 

i s 

_* 

n 

Oi 

15} 



4) 
12 

i s 

191 



Khokand, saj's the cable, will probably be 
probably as that when a bear puts his nose into a 
nex " the honey. 



annexed to Russia ; as 
hive he intends to "an- 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 5, 1876. 



SPECIAL BREVITIES. 



Common Sense Ventilation.— "Air is like a rope ; you can pull it 
better than you can push it. " All mechanical appliances for pushing air 
into a room or a house are disappointing - . What we need to do is to pull 
out the vitiated air already in the room ; the fresh supply will take care of 
itself if means for its admission are provided. It has been usual to with- 
draw the air through openings near the ceiling — that is, to carry off the 
warmer and therefore lighter portions, leaving the colder strata at the 
bottom of the room, with their gradual accumulation of cooled carbonic 
acid undisturbed. Much the better plan would be to draw this lower air 
out from a point near the floor, allowing the upper and warmer por- 
tions to descend and take its place. An open fire, with a large chimney 
throat, is the best ventilator for any room ; the one-half or two-thirds of 
the heat carried up the chimney is the price paid for immunity from dis- 
ease ; and large though this seems, from its daily draft on the wood-pile 
or coal-bin, it is trifling when compared to doctors bills, and with the loss 
of strength and efficiency that invariably result from living in uuventilated 
apartments. 

The Philadelphia "Times" publishes an interesting letter showing 
that the water of artesian wells is not fit to drink. There is an artesian 
well at Beading 2,000 feet deep, costing §22,000, which contains forty- 
seven grains of epsom salt to the gallon. An artesian well at Fifth and 
Cherry street, Philadelphia, contains 116 grains of foreign matter to the 
gallon, and can only be used to condense steam for the boiler. An artesian 
well in South street furnishes water not fit for steam. At Seventh Btreet 
and Passyunk road there are two artesian wells, each 100 feet deep, but 
the water of both is so impure that it can only be used for condensing. The 
water of the well at the Continental Hotel is not pure. At Lousiville 
there is a well 2,649 feet deep, one in St. Louis 2,086 feet deep, one in 
South Bend, and one in Terre Haute, but the water of them all is impreg- 
nated with minerals, and fit only for medicinal uses. At Atlantic City a 
number of wells have been bored in the hope of getting pure water, but 
not one yields water fit for household use. 

Dr. Livingston's Dog. — Lieut. Murphy, whose name is well known in 
connection with the Cameron expedition into Central Africa,, is in Bom- 
bay. The gallant officer, according to the Times of India, has a com- 
panion also distinguished in African travel. This is the late Dr. Living- 
stone's dog, the only dog that has survived a journey into Central Africa. 
This faithful creature traveled from Zanzibar to Unyanyembe with the 
explorer, and then followed Livingstone's body back to the coast. The 
dog wears a medal bearing the following inscription : " Mabel F. R. G-. 
O., late Livingstone, East Coast African Expedition, 1873-4." It i3 a 
small sized bull terrier, white in color, and we are sorry to say in very in- 
firm health. It traveled 1,500 miles in Africa — a wonderful effort in pe- 
destrianism— before it was 12 months old, and it has since traveled 15,000 
miles by sea. 

Hog Slaughter. — The Cincinnati Commercial describes an improved 
process of pig-killing, by which, in two and a half minutes, a live hog was 
converted into bacon. The hogs are driven up the gang-way to the slaugh- 
ter pen, where a negro claps a chain round the hind legs of each in suc- 
cession. The pressure of a steam lever jerks the pig into the air, and in 
an instant another man plunges a knife into his throat. A constant line 
of hogs thus fatally wounded slide down an elevated bar, and being dead 
by the time they reach the end, are plunged eight or ten at a time into a 
tank of boiling water. A revolving iron skid, worked by steam, throws 
them out singly on a long wooden table, where a dozen men are employed 
in scraping them. To cut up a thousand hogs is considered a fair day's 
work for one man in this wonderful Porkopolis. 

A quarter-inch rod of the best steel will sustain 9,000 pounds before 
breaking; soft steel, 7,000; iron wire, 6,000; iron, 4,000; inferior bar 
iron, 2,000 ; cast iron, 1,000 to 3,000 ; copper wire, 3,000 ; silver, 2,000 ; 
gold, 2,500 ; tin, 3,000 ; cast zinc, 160 ; cast lead, 50 ; milled lead, 200. Of 
wood, box and locust, the same size will hold 1,200 pounds ; ash (toughest), 
1,000 ; elm, 800 ; beech, cedar, white oak, pitch pine, 600 ; chestnut and 
maple, 650 ; poplar, 400. 

It is now rumored that Boss Tweed is concealed in Trinity steeple, a 
place which no one has visited in three weeks. Other rumors are that he 
is in the caisson of the Brooklyn Bridge, the Tall Tower, Jay Gould's 
pocket— which has carried two men nearly as large— concealed in the vast 
recesses of his own cheek, at the other end of Sheriff Conner's conscience, 
and under a cloud. Probably he is either at the end of his rope or the bot- 
tom of a well. 

One of the newest articles produced in Germany is an artificial grind- 
stone. These grindstones are made at the city of Worms of grit, soluble 
glass, and petroleum. The proportions are not given by the journal to 
which we are indebted for information concerning their fabrication. It is 
said that they are so firm as to endure a very high speed without becom- 
ing soft. 

Coyotes were never known to be so plentiful in the vicinity of Austin 
as at present, and regardless of the bounty offered in the law for the de- 
struction of noxious animals, they make it very warm for sheep in that 
vicinity. Th*: sheep herders poison a great many of them, and bring their 
scalps to town and claim the bounty. 

And now the Alfonsist troops are concentrating, and it looks blue 
for the Car-lists, Isabella — with her gingham um-ber-ella — is seen coming 
over the Pyrenees to join her son. The '" umberella" is to aid him in his 
reign, of course. There is no other news from Spain. 

A telegram from Yokohama states that a Portuguese, having been 
detected in trying to negotiate false letters of credit, purporting to have 
been issued by the Japanese Government, for $3,000,000, had fled either to 
America or Europe. 

Madame Christine Nilsson has made an engagement to give eight con- 
certs in Scandinavia — four in Stockholm, two in Christiana, and two in 
Copenhagen— during the ensuing Spring. 

A strange animal, about the size of a California lion, but with longer 
legs and a bristling mane, has been recently seen near Eureka, and hunters 
are in pursuit. 

The admirers of Madame Ristori in Australia talk of presenting 
her with a golden wreath set with Australian diamonds. 

Fossil scorpions are extremely rare, but several have been recently 
found in the Sandwell Park colliery, England. 



BROKERS. 



SAMUEL McKEE & CO , 

Stock Brokers anil dealers In Stock Privileges, 324 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. We transact a general Stock Brokerage Business. 
Buy ami Sell Stocks for cash or on a margin, making cash advances on active accounts. 

We make a special ty of Stock Privileges. Our business has assumed such proportions 
that we are compelled to remove from our late office to the large office. No. 321 Mont- 
gomery street (Safe Deposit Company's Building). Our Brokers are DR. C. W. Fi >\ 
and CHAS. N. NEAL, Members of the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board. 
Bankers : The Nevada Bank of San Francisco. Our Weekly Circular, containing the 
highest and lowest prices of active Stocks for each day for the past thirty days, with 
a Pamphlet explaining Stock Privileges, sent free to any address. No. 324 Montgom- 
ery street, S. F. Office at Virginia City, in Wells, Fargo & Co.'s building. Jan. 29. 



REM07AL! 
W. Brown A- Co., Stock and Money Brokers, have re- 



^J « moved to No. 317 Montgomery street, Nevada Block 
J. W. Brown, Mein. S. F. Stock and Exch. Board. [Jan. 



Geo. S. Brows 



NOTICE OF KEMOVAL. 

Fry, »al A Co.. Commission Stock Brokers* have removed 
to No. 330 Montgomery street. Safe Deposit Building. 
Chas. S. Neal, Member S. F. Stock & Exch. Board. [Jan. 20,] E. M. Fry. 

Albert A. Hickox. Thomas Steel. H. G. KOHL, 

KIHL, STEEL AM> HICKOX, 

Stock Brokers, 302 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. [10-2. 

D. G. SC0FIE1D & CO., 

(Commission Stock Brokers, buy anil sell all stocks, and 
J carry same on margin. Rooms 6 and 7, No. 315 California street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Jan. 15. 

JAMES H. LATHAM & CO , 

Stock and Money Brokers, 411 California street, San Fran* 
cisco. Member S. F. Stock and Exchange Board. Money loaned on Stocks. 
Stocks bought and carried on margins. Jan. 8. 

SHEnwnoD Callaghan.] NOTICE OF KEMOVAL. [Jehemiah Lynch. 

Clallaghan. Lynch A- Co. have removed to No. 10G Eeidesrtorff 
J street, near corner of Halleck. Jan. 8. 

JOHN G. AYRES, 

Late of Ayros. Cone A Co., will negotiate loans, and liuy and 
sell stocks of every description on conimission. Otfice : No. 307 Montgomery 
street (Nevada Block.) Jan. 8. 

SAiVUEL McKEE & CO., 
rokers and Dealers in Stock Privileges, Pnts and Calls, 

224 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Jan. 1. 



B 



A. A- Hickox.] HICKOX, KUHL & CO., [H. G. Kihl. 

Stockbrokers, 302 Sansome street, corner California, arc 
now prepared to buy and sell Stocks on Commission, and loan money on 
Stocks. All orders intrusted to our care will receive our most careful attention. 10 2. 

Edwin F. Child, S. F. Stock Exchange. George E. Maquire. 

CHILD & MAGUIRE, 

Commission Stock Brokers. 433 California street.— Stocks 
Bought, Sold and Carried on Margins. Liberal Advance on active accounts, 
Sight and Time Drafts on National Bank of Republic, New York, in sums to 
suit.. June 5. 

E. P. PECKHAM, 

(Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock Ex- 
J change, 413 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive prompt execution and return. 
(June. 19.] 



CAHILL & CO., STOCKBROKERS, 
406 Montgomery Street- 



Dec. 11. 



HUBBARD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers, 333 and 324 California street, 
San Francisco, will transact business through the San Francisco Stock and Ex- 
change Board. _^_____ ** u]v *'- 

D. M. Hosmkr.] HOSMER & BOURNE, (J- B. Bourne. 

Stock Brokers, 116 Halleck Street, San Francisco. Post- 
oIHcl' Address, Lock liox li<37. August 7. 

F. G. BERRY, 

Late of Berry A Capp, Commission Stock Broker. Office at 
former place of business, 418 Montgomery street. Sept. 18. 



X C WINANS, 
Stock Broker, 319 California street. 



Nov. fi. 



WIRE AND WIRE ROPE FOR SALE IN STORE OR IN BOND. 

I^T/W'h miles, Xos. 8 and 9, Galvanized Telegraph Wire. 
p ]W\ "" " 200 Coils Galvanized Wire Hope for Ship Rigging. In Store— All kinds 
of Wire, Galvanized on Black Iron, Brass, Copper, Steel, Market, Stone, Spring, 
Tinned, etc., etc. In Stock and Made to Order— 

BRASS AND IRON WIRE CLOTH, 

Battery Screens, Fly Cloth, Ore Screens, Sand Screens, Wire Netting, Galvanized or 
not ; Ornamental Wire Work of all kinds, Staples, Riddles and Seives of all kinds. 
Flower Stands, Summer Houses, and everything that can be made from Wire. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 Pine street, S. F. 

WIRE ROPE, 

Flat and poii ml. o. r Iron or Steel, on hand or made to order 
of unequaled excellence. Picture Cords, Sash Cords, etc., etc. 
Jan. 22. A S. HALLIDIE, 113 Pine street. 

TO OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE. 

Persons wnin; Beal Estate, tli \t ha? hsretofre been 
assessed in the former owner's name, are requested to appear personally, or 
sand their Deads to the Assessor's Ofica immediately, and have tlunacassary changes 
mid.; for tha il3xt year's Ri!l. T.ie work on fie Real Estate Roll will commence in a 
few days, after which it will be too late for any changes. 
Jan, 29. ALEXANDER BADLAM, City and Count y Assessor. 

MONEY TO LOAN. ~ 

John T. I.iriie. Money Broker and Ileal Estate Affent. dis- 
counts notes and loans money on all kinds of collaterals in large amounts ; buys l; 
and sells real estate. OFFICE: 405A CALIFORNIA STREET, | 

Dec. 25. Opposite Bank of California. 



r . 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



16 



FAITH. 

r bod 

With plume md kurvoled hair; 

Aii'l I laid : 

■* M..i It b«i u . . r nol 

the her *na t" strengthen on ih< 
Uu " • not whisper thai which either knovn 
Of i n uid of rapturotu i 

An.l Ik whoaODMDi wai Rope, whoM ' 

Wore ala 13 bed, reap roded now : 

"0 brother. I ty thine hand upon her brow ; 
r.'iiit'Tt dot with Godi promiae while *li>- dionf 
Whemnl hi* felluw-angol nearer drew 

To the whitv nifferer'a pillows, pausing there. 
Hut on ■ midden, outlined trow void ;>ir. 
a third angel, rtatelier than the two, 
"Nothing until the and may*s1 thoa reveal !" 

Calm, y- 1 oonunanding, hia clear voice ran.,' out 
•■ TTbi better bo die battling a i t > 1 one doubt, 
Than « ith :ill knowledge at the Throne t" kneel '" 

-Edgar Fmcrtt. 

CHECKING OVER-ISSUES OF STOCK. 

The loose system 1 -f stock tavnee now in rogue make it :i matter of 
wonder thai over-iaeues are not more prevalent, but tin- same laxity ex- 
plains that detection i* not easily made. A Mining Commissioner might 
lake prevent] 03 requiring tin- Presidents and Secretaries to 

tilr ;i -.«orn Btatement semi-monthly of stock outstanding, giving in detail 
the number of each certificate and the number of shares corresponding. 
The names of st.n-khol.h-rs or trustees would also lie requisite. These 
li-t- open to public inspection in the Cniiiiuissiiuier's office — would be a 
Valuable cheek against fraudulent stock. People who over-issue cannot 
do 10 with :i limit of only two weeks in which to redeem. Their spurious 
■lock would pass from hand to hand without returning to the office, and 
the official list just equalising the total capital stock would speedily show 
any falsity upoti comparison. Besides, the President or Vice-President of 
a company should be required to compare all certificates issued with those 
surrendered, and to sign no blank certificates. If, however, the Legisla- 
ture UDpardonably omits to establish a 4 tonunisaion, the duty then devolves 
upon the Stock Boards t<> provide for the security of their clients. These 
institutions receive in commissions probably £3,000,000 annually, in addi- 
tion to Large fees from the companies for being listed and called. They 
hav consequently no excuse for spigot economy. They have the power 
to compel every Btock on their list to comply with such a sensible neces- 
iiiiL' this.it would be requisite to appoint special officers, 
Bay two registers and three recording clerks. Eveiy company should fur- 
Dish a hook uniformly ruled, and with the outstanding certificates and 
shares we will assume for February 1st. Then each day the companies 
hand in the certificates issued, and a memorandum certified to by the 
President or Vice, and Secretary. This memorandum would be headed 
with the date and underneath the issues, thus, 11,290— 50— ex 4,032 (the 
latter figures representing the number of certificate canceled — the first 
and intermediate figures showing the number of new certificate and num- 
ber of shares respectively. Where a piece of stock is subdivided, the va- 
rious numbers can he combined with a bracket centering on the canceled 
number. After a proper comparison, the new certificates are then officially 
stamped by the registers and returned to the company. The clerks write 
up the memorandum, and cross out canceled numbers. All this need only 
cause the delay of a day. or even less, in delivery. In case of assessment 
Bales, the Secretaries should transmit a copy of the result. In this con- 
nection something ought to be done to avoid fractional issues. These are 
principally the offshoots of assessment sales. The companies should re- 
call all fractions of a share, and, following an even basis, whenever a ten 
share certificate (or anything' else) is to be sold for assessment, let it be 
taken in for company account, and if at the end of sixty days it is not 
redeemed, then let it be sold, and the coin balance be held at the disposal 
of the proper claimant. We have to remark, in conclusion, that unless 
some system is adopted, the " street " will wake up some fine morning and 
discover a bonanza of over-issued stock. Vcrbum sat sap. 

YE BOHEMIAN. 

He entertains a calm consciousness of superiority over the rest of man- 
kind, like that which one feels in kicking a mule when the latter is unable 
to return the compliment. Is an ultra Red in the Republic of letters, and 
thought Dan O'Connell an effete monarchist when he wrote " Bohemia, 
though an empire grand," but forgave him when he let up on City Lyrics. 
Thinks " Our Club " a little ahead of anything on the footstool, and meas- 
ures the wit of other members by his own yard stick, always favorably to — 
himself. Has a sneaking objection to the jokeB of Campbell, Barnes, Lake, 
et a!, because they are strictly legitimate, and whenever Harry Edwards 
gets off a good thing, doubts whether a scientific bug sharp can be a true 
Bohemian, bugcause no bug however sharp has an os hum irus. Is com- 
munistic on all property rights except copyright, and never objects to any 
other fellow squaring the tipple. Objects to paupers of the Carmany 
stripe and scan mags of the Overland kind. Is partial to borrowed paint- 
ings and cheap music, and manages to corral the latter by invitations to 
the Club. " They are the jolliest set of fellows in town, you know !" (We 
don't kn<nv, but then a Bohemian never lies.) Thinks Bromley first-rate 
at impromptu wit when he has had time to think it over and knows how 
many times he has responded to " The Ladies — God bless 'em. 1 ' Wonders 
what biz MacCrellish has in a literary club, and why he ever orates to 
" The Pres3." Wishes Pixley would give his hobbies a re3t, and thinks 
Sam Williams throws himself away en the Bulletin. The saddest thing in 
life is when the free list is positively suspended and he wants to take his 
girl there. Believes there is no time of day like the night, and favors 
nocturnal prowling. Affects long hair because other geniuses wear it. 
Thinks Mark Twain hogged it on " Densmore's Gilded Age," and that 
Mark writes more for lucre than fame, anyway. Thanks God ten times a 
day because he is so much more talented than other people. Amen — Finis 
—The End. ' 

That Tennessee preacher forgot himself, who, while addressing a 
ladies' charitable society, said, " I now urge all of you to dive down into 
your breeches' pockets and haul out for the poor." 



i.ri-iMKhT.] 

A ROGUE'S RETROSPECT. 
■;i Hi.' \.-is fork Trim I 
"LorlmrPickernw ofthrSt. Loo 

■ 

■: rrrd h* 

vverc Immediately icnl up th< M ar#ull of 

•• hirn.iu- li wan eappoaed he had started tot California,— /W/adMoMa Buiutin." 

\ Prom th< v ■■■ 11 ■■ . .Mil'- ip w 

" Arrest of Pickering, late Editor of tte St. Louie Union. — hunm. 
queoi inconnti da nol rnflroly confUn t; . t% port* hitherto received, it In now 
'* stated, by lho*e who ongbt to know, mil Pickering was arrwted In SI ■ 
•' by Me-eere, Trcni a Brumrun, md puhseqni ntlj committed to the caBtrVh ol tni 

"Sheriff, or one of rt» deputies, ol Buchanan C ty, White In costody be found 

off to parte unknown, Tbe party in porenlt of bin 

"li h« mIo, out] - 1 ci eded in obtal g 1700 from film, and no otner property .>r 

"notes, Thorn- 1 r purr-nil, we arc told, wtc not prepared w lib any nutLiorlty to 
"follow htm bey ml the limit!- of tin- .suite, .v. umi* /;</>N?,ti,-<tn. 1WA." 

[From tbe New Fork Tribune, June 20, 1849.1 
" The Absquatulator. — Information waa received from St. Joseph yester- 
u day that JnVear*. Krnmron ft Treal came up with Pickerings! that place; thai 
*• iin'v compounded w itii b)m for his offenses by receiving eome *"'>o in money and 
"abonl fi.noo in note- of hand, etc, nnd then Icl htm go. When the boat left ho 
"was Bttlng our lor California, nnd they were returning by easy stages to Bt 
" Louie.— St. Louia litpublican, Qth." 

I •The above mimed Lorfiig Pickering 1* now one ol tbe Proprietors of the San 

Francisco Daily Evening Bulletin and Jforuing Call, two papers publiebcd in 
till- city.] 

LEV & PERUIN'S CELEBRATED WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, 

Deelnrert by Connoisseurs* to be tbe Only Cioori Kniic* ■..--in 
consequence of spurious imitations ol LEA & PERRINS' SAUCE, which are 
calculated t<> deceive the public. Lea & Perrina have adopted & mns label, bearing 
their Bjgnature, LEA & PERRINS, which will he placed on every bottle of WORCES- 
TERSHIRE SAUCE, after this date, and without which none la genuine. November, 
1874. This does not apply to shipments made prior to the dale given. 

Ask for Lea & Perrine' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stopper. 
Wholesale and for export hy the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse «v Blackwell, Lon- 
don, etc., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To he obtained of 

August 2a. MESSRS. CROSS & Co., .Sim Francisco. 

KEATING'S COUGH LCZENGES. 

Uinuinls of Of ty years experience has 1 nlly eonfirmed tbe 
superior reputation of these Lozenges in the (.'ore of Asthma, Winter Cough, 
Hoarseness, Short !ic>* of Hreath, and other Pulmonary Maladies. Sold in bottles of 
various sizes. HEATING'S BON-HONS, or CHILDREN'S WORM TABLETS, a purely 
vegetable sweetmeat, furnishing both in appearance and taste a most agreeable 
method of administering a well-known remedy for intestinal or Thread Worms. It 
is a perfectly safe and mild preparation, and especially adapted fur Children. Sold '- 
bottles of various sizes. T1IOS. KEATING, London, 

Export Chemist and Druggist. 
Indents for Pure Drugs and Chemicals carefully executed. 
Agents— Cuarlbs Lakqley & Co., corner Battery and Clay sts., S. F. June 29. 

MARAVILLA COCOA. 

Tnylor Rrnthem (the larsrfMt iriai; ufi.eluiei'H of Coron In Fnro|ir), 
having the Exclusive Supply of thiB unrivaled Cocoa, invite comparison with 
any other Cocoa for purity, tine aroma, sanative, nutratlve and sustaining power, 
easiness of digestion, and* especially High Delicious Flavor. One trial will estab- 
lish It as a favorite beverage for breakfast, luncheon, and a Hoo'.hlng refreshment 
after a late evening. N. li. Caution— "MARA VILLA" is a registered Trade Mark. 

MAEAVILLA COCOA. 

The Globe nnyn, »*Tnyl«r iiniili.iV IMTiirn villa Coeoa hn» itchieved a 
thorough success, and supersedes every other Cocoa In the market. Entire 
solubility, a delicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest elements of nu- 
trition, distinguish the Mara villa Cocoa above all others. For invalids and dyspep- 
tics, we could not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverajje." Foi further 
favorable opinions vide Standard, Morning Post, British Medical Journal, etc., etc. 

HOMEOPATHIC COCOA. 

ThiH oiM'srin.'il prep:ii'jttin>' luta :,(<:■£■«■<) a « «irl<t-wI«Fe rern** 1 Iton . 
and i8 manufactured by TAYLOR BROTHERS, under the ablest Homoeopathic 
advice, aided by the skill and experience of the inventors, and will be found to com- 
bine in an eminent degree the purity, fine aroma, and nutritious property of the 

fresh nut. 

SOLUBLE CHCC0IATE. 
ntle In one niin ute iv'tlioiil l>o»ii s — 'I he nbove Drlleleit nre pre- 
pared exclusively by TAYLOR BROTHERS, the largest manufacturers in 
curope, and sold in tin-lined packets onlv, hv storekeepers and others nil over the 
world. STEAM MILLS, BRICK LANE, LONDON. Export Chicory Mills, Brugt s, 
Belgiura- May 10. 

ROWLANDS' MACASfAB OIL 

PreKervi'ft. 'li«'r:-i! i>. • :ir <1 Im-; mi ti .«■■> Hi*- Ititiiiiii* hnlr : molcei* ft 
grow thickly on hald places, and eradicates scurj and dandruff: lias been In 
use all over the world for the last seven ty-flve years. ROWLANDS' ESSENCE OF 
TYRE changes red or prey hair to a permanent brown or black. Sold everywhere by- 
all draegisis, chemists and patent medicine dealers. Ask for Rowlands' Articles, of 
'id, Hatton Garden, London, and avoid imitations. M ay 1. 

BEST FOOD FOE INFANTS, 

SnpB>l.i ii>- the highest amount or nonrishment in the most 
digestible and convenient form. SAVORY & MOORE, 143 New Bond street, 
London, and all Chemists and Storekeepers throughout the World. June 19. 

CAUTION— BETTS'S PATENT CAPSULES. 

The- public :tie r*"»iu'«-t »V l lv erntioreri Hi: 1 It-ll-V B :. t«-n t CitpriifeK 
are being Infringed. BETTS'S name Is upon even* Capsule he mnkeslor the 
leading Merchants at home and abroad, and he la the Only Inventor nnd Sole Maker 
In the United Kingdom. Makufactouib: 1, Wuaef Road, City Load,! cnhok, 
and Bordkaux, FuaNck. June 15. 

J. H- CUTTEE OLD B0UEB0N. 

C^ P. Moorman A Co., Tfannfaetiirers, Louisville, Ky.— 
j% The above well-known House is represented here by the undersigned, who 
have been appointed their Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 3. A. P. HOTALING & C( >. , 429 and 431 Jackson street, S. F. 

WANTED, 

By a young; man, a situation as Book-keeper, or any light 
work he is capable of doing. Good letters of recommendation from his last 
employers. (Jan. 8.] ALFRED GURREY, Postotfice, S. F. 



M 



s 



JOSEPH GIIL0TTS S'EEL PEPS. 
old by all Stationers throughout the Worlil. Sole Agent 

for the United States : MK. HENKY OWEN, 91 John street, N, Y. Jan. 16. 



P 



QUICKSILVER. 
or sale— In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, "So. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 1G\ 



16 



SAtf FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 5, 1876. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 



A lie has no lees, aurt cannot stand ; bat it "aas wings, and can fly fur and wide. — 
Warbubton. With the adaptability of a lie, sin lias many tools, hut a lie Is the 
handle which fltw them all.— Lord Bkough\m. A lie begets others ; one lie must be 
thatched with another or It will soon rain through.— Lord Tuurlowb. 

** And the Parson made It his text that week, and he said likewise, 
That a lie which is half a lie is ever the blackest of lies ; 
That a lie that is all a lie may be met and fought with outright. 
But a lie which Is Dart a truth Is a harder matter to 0£ht."— Tbkntson. 

San Francisco Lies. — It is not true that our Russian Professor, Von 
Schmidt, after concluding his survey at Lake Tahoe, returned to the Pio- 
neer's Society, and struck the Spring- Valley in conjunction with Lawyer 
Clarke. Von Schmidt was well aware that the waters of Clear Lake 
produced valuable cubes of borax, but what was the Professor's amaze- 
ment to find the artesian well with which the worthy judge supplied him 
gave out a large volume of acrid or briny fluid to such an extent that 
his lachrymose optic has been shielded from the mid-day sun until lately. 
The green shade is now happily removed. This curiouB incident carries 
with it a speck of unfairness in the whole affair, because it takes a couple 
of C's to be equal in hight to one Von. "We are reminded thereby of Mil- 
ton's couplet: 

"Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, 
And made Hell grant what love did seek." 
That that "uneasy little wretch," Pocahontas Smith, ever sits in the or- 
chestra now. ^— That J. Knox Brown is a liar and a thief. ^— That Pet- 
tus owns the Palace.— That when he left New York it tipped up.^— 
That he charges four prices.— — That his productions are all slop 
shop work razeed down. — That Jim McKenzie took Spanish 
lessons while in San Francisco ; that he spoke the language fluently after 
taking one lesson of five hours' duration.— That Robinson, of the Olym- 
pic Club, did not pav for that badge presented to him last Friday even- 
ing.— —That Ed. F." and Ed. S. got a ducking in Lake Merrit.— - That 
Harry George is a gas meter.— That Gift paid for the oysters he lost at 
Manning's last week.— That Prof. W. F. Marklay was seen selling 
whistles on Market street on Monday night. ^— That Rev. Dr. Stone re- 
fused to sermonize on a recent stormy Sunday evening because he had 
only fifteen auditors. —That Supervisor Strother ever talks too much; 
that he displayed good taste in procuring the discharge of a gardener for 
political reasons. ' - That the contractor who built the caved sewer on 
Hayes street should be hung.— That West Evans is the great Ty-coon 
of this coast.— That Ida W. brags she will marry Louis Z.— That he 
will be ruined and disgraced if she does.^— That she had better be sent 
back to Clarke's. 

Vallejo Lies. — It is not true that M. J. Wright ever wishes to be rid 
of his accumulation of secrets.— That J. G. Smith is a good judge of 
model statuary. ■ That George Wood has refined musical sensibilities. 
■—That F. Sanders ever offers the ladies " Solace " for chewing gum.— 
That John Brownlie is a devout student of "Sam Slick."— -That A. 
Powell would like to establish a branch institution at Mare Island.^^ 
That W. C. Nelson's prosperity is the direct result of unlimited blowing. 
— —That Ed. Morton thinks blue ties very becoming.^— That P. R. 
Walsh reflects Vallejo's prosperity. —That Frank O'Grady wants an en- 
gagement as " end man ' ■ in a minstrel troupe. That J. G. Lawton car- 
ries a crushing load of briefs. ■ That James Crellin is opaque to a joke. 
^— That D. G. Barnes has a nice smooth manner, especially with strang- 
ers.^— That M. L. Kelley was disappointed with his last visit to Sacra- 
mento. —^That John Handforth ought to go into the business of magnetic 
healing.— That J. A. Atchison will be askedto officiate at the ceremonies 
of laying the foundation stone of the " Good Templars' Hall."—— That B. 
H. Ivory has discovered an invaluable secret for giving a polish to linen, 
i That Hammell & Connelly expect active business immediately after 
17th March.— That James Cook would likea business with more potatoes 

and less starch. ■ That William York is living too fast. That Widen- 

mann & Rothenbusch are each proficient gaugers.— =That they can tell 
the capacity of their patrons at a glance. -^— That J. N. Saucts fills up his 
spare time counting the sands in his sample barrel.— That J. F. McGill 
hails from " Georgia."— — That H. H. Snow thinks his presence at a fire 
is equal to a whole engine company. —That John Roach e says, "Walk- 
ing is the sole enjoyment of life." That J. L. Heald is Vallejo's strong- 
est supporter.— That John Frey wishes Christmas came twelve times in 
the year.' " -That J. B. Williston is studying the Law of Contracts. 

Napa City Lies. — It is not true that George W. Gift has a weakness 
for sending presentation copies of the Napa County Reporter where the 
effect will be most appreciated.— —That W. C. Watson has a weak side ; 
that it is his faith in vine stocks.— That G. A. Blank is trying hard to 
develop artistic taste in Napa.— That Nan Beven will be the Rothschild 
of Napa County. That James H. Goodman has any interest in Demo- 
cratic politics.— That Ben Woodward has sent East for a fishing 
canoe.— That Parks is growing handsome every year. ^— That Boggs 
and Pond will go into partnership."^— That J. O. Shafer is as unrelenting 
as granite. ■■ -That Pendegast has a delicate taste for shrimps.— That 
J. Giles watches the County records with an eagle eye. -^— That J. N. 
Pearson has a most delicate hand.— That his grip is most destructive. — 
That George B. Clifford knows the road to Sonoma. That James Don- 
nelly boasts his " pioneer" experiences.— ^That J. E. Nicholls learned a 
few fresh anecdotes last week,— That R. N. Steere deserted the navy 
for something better. '■■ — That Chancellor Hartson's modesty prevents 
him from signing his name in full. ^— That N. E. Steward has lost his 
voice.— —That he has doubled his commissions in consequence.-^ That 
Daly & Eison developed a new plan last week. — That every one will soon 
hear of the prodigy.— That J. H. Mallett is a man of the knife.— That 

A. G. Hull has lost all interest in the doings at the State Capitol. -^— That 
R. H. Sterling enjoys hearing his friends repeat his name. That D. 
Devoe can trace his ancestors back to the fourteenth century.— That W. 

B. Mugford is very anxious to secure our Liar a homestead in Napa.— — 
That B. L. Longfellow knows a single line of the "Tales of a Wayside 
Inn."— That Dennis Spencer is an ardent admirer of the " Fairy 
Queen. "—That E. N. Boynton is going to swim from Napa to San 
Francisco on the Fourth of July. 

Benicia Lies. — It is not true that McKay, the blonde Tanner, is about 

to take unto himself a wife. That the ladies of Benicia would like to 

know her name.— =- That Jones goes to "Bottle Hill" in preference to 

sending his man. That his attentions are thoroughly appreciated in that 

[Continued on Twelfth Page.] 



ASLEEP. 

Wee hands so meekly folded Soft hair all tossed and tumbled 

Across a tiny breast ; Around a dimpled face ; 

Blue eyes of drooping; beauty, Sweet baby-smile so peaceful, 

All closed in peaceful rest— And full of baby grace— [strong ; 

Sleep, baby, sleep— lie oalm and still, Rest, darling, rest— grow bold and 

And dream sweet dreams, and fear You will find life's pathway rough 
no nl. and long. 



empty little cradle 

And lonely little grave". 
O heart all crushed and broken — 

God help me to be brave. 
Gone, baby, gone— but I know where ; 
I'll trust thee to my Saviour's care. — Will Beardsley. 

SENATOR SHARON'S DEPARTURE. 

Apropos of the departure of Senator Sharon for Washington, and the 
general interest which we see by our exchanges from the Capital is man- 
ifested in regard to his appearance there, we take occasion to herald his 
active participation in the political hub-bub of the other side of the con- 
tinent, by a brief reference to the real chief claim he has upon the interest 
and attention of the busy world of the Nation's administrative center. 
For over a year the scrutiny of the East has been fixed with peculiar 
steadiness upon the wonderful development and opportunities of the Pa- 
cific Coast, and those of our citizens who have not visited the States for 
some time would be astonished themselves at the general and undissuadable 
ideas of the colossal fortunes and universal wealth that are supposed to 
prevail here. To the dweller in the over-traded and over-crowded East, 
the mere mention of " Califomian " seems to at once imply the personal 
possession of the veritable lamp of Alladin, or at least an interest in the 
"Philosopher's Stone " itself. That this amiable illusion is a nattering 
one we need scarcely say, but of the possessors of the baker's dozen of co- J 
lossal fortunes that have given rise to this popular theory, there is no one 
who has excited more interest and curiosity in the East than the gentle- 
man known there by the soubriquet of the " Bonanza Senator." 

The busy fraternity of the quill, ever anxious to originate sensations of 
an enduring and mysterious nature, have already endowed Mr. Sharon 
with as many diverse, not to say conflicting, attributes as would go towards 
the composition of an individual concentration of a Monte Christo and Lo- 
renzo di Medici. The stories that have been set afloat through the realms 
of newspaperdom regarding— and the minute personal descriptions of— the 
gentleman whose name heads this article, doubtless astonish no one so 
much as the subject thereof himself. We have no wish to discourage the 
well meant assiduity of our exchanges on the other side of the mountains, 
but we desire to say a grave and hearty word or two regarding what we 
consider the real chief reason of Senator Sharon's popularity in the city 
and State that is proud to call him citizen. This does not lie in his great , 
wealth, or any other purely adventitious reason whatever. It is because 
in that inconceivably dreadful and never to be forgotten hour when the 
great bank went down, and the shocked heart of a vast business commu- 
nity stopped beating in the awful anticipation of impending ruin, it was 
the single arm of this one man that was first lifted to stem the sweeping 
tide of financial disaster. It was the quiet but resolute figure of this one j 
man that rose amid the white faces of that memorable meeting of our city's 
magnates, and, with half his fortune in his hand, led the way into the 
widening breach. It was he who assumed the control of the six million > 
hotel with a quiet stroke of the pen ; it was his strong hand that finally 1 
held the head of the grand old bank above water until the storm had ] 
passed. And to-day the solid foundation of the bridge on which a com- 
munity of seven hundred thousand people crossed the chasm of business ] 
and commercial ruin, is composed of probably a third — at least ten mil- J 
lions — of the fortune of this one unostentatious and unpretentious man. j 
It is not a mere money bag that we send to jingle his dollars in the Senate. 
Senator Sharon may or may not add to his present reputation in the j 
council halls of the nation, but nothing can ever lessen or erase the endur- J 
ing place he has won for himself in the gratitude and affection of every 
dweller on the Pacific Coast. 

YE HOODLUM. 

" Like the lily of the valley," he is the result of spontaneous combus- 
tion, and, mushroom-like, emanated from a compost of total depravity, \ 
somewhat similar to an alligator hatching out of slime. This fungus, this 
toadstool, is the equivalent of a New York Bowery Boy, with the added 
brutality of a nigger driver and the cowardice and treachery of an Apache s 
Indian. In appearance he patterns on the style of a flash-dealer in bogus j 
jewelry, with the greasy exterior of an oilman on duty. Delights in ob- > 
scene vulgarity in public, and spends the force of a cancarous brain in the 
invention of strange baths. Marauds on the solitary storekeeper when — j 
coyote like — numbers give him courage. Insults women with pleasure, \ 
and waylays old men and boys in the darkness. Generally carries a "gun 
for intimidation, or a " toadsticker " to " cut " with on short notice. Fre- \ 
quents the lowest cesspools of the metropolis, and has a female of the spe- 
cies who is known as his " chunk, cow or heifer," and whose duty it is to 
furnish her lord with subsistence and pocket money, her reward being 
abuse and desertion when some more attractive "chunk" claims his atten- ] 
tion. Attacking Chinese with clubs or stones is a favorite pastime, es- 
pecially when on a " tare." Being " snaked " up in the Police Court for 
some extra atrocity is his ambition. If this animal has a single redeeming 
trait, the people of the city whose atmosphere is poisoned by his presence 
have never discovered it. San Quentin is his reward of merit, the whip- 
ping post or the gallows his only adequate settlement. If the stranger ob- 
serves this description, he may know how to avoid a pest, beside which the 
Mephitis Ameriwnus is an angel. 

Thefearfalatormthat has chilled our usually salubrious climate recently, 
has also, we are informed by the unimpeachable wire, visited Sacramento 
with the very first experience of ice in the memory of the oldest inhabit- 
ant. The native inhabitants have, in consequence, been going skating with 
more vigor than intelligence. For instance, a party of young ladies to the 
manor born, and who had never been to the other end of the incorporated 
swindle that runs through their town, ventured upon the treacherous con- 
gelation the other day, and were incontinently ducked. We take pleas- 
ure, therefore, in informing these ingenuous birdlings of our sxmny slope 
that they never go skating in the East without having a man underneath 
to hold up the ice with a pole. 



Postscript 





CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




Offloe-607 to eiC Rlerohant Street. 



VOLUME 26 



SAN FHANCISCO, FEB. 6, 1876- 



NUMBER 1. 



MR STANFORD S LETTERS TO THE LEGISLATURE. 

We print herewith Governor Stanford's two recent tetters to the 
tutv, ainl which have excited so much attention and genera^ dis- 
■nwrTrn : 

To tke Honorable, t'» Committee on Corporation* of the Auembly of the 
■ California ■ 

Gentlemen : I am advised that bills are pending in the Legislature 
having for their objects State interference with the management of rail- 
koads, and a modification in essential particulars of the Btatntes in pur- 
fcuane ■ with which corporations were organized and are now operating 
nearly all of the railways within the State. Aa the representative of the 

Srincipal roads to be affected thereby! it will not be regarded aa intermed- 
Ung with that which lines not concern me, if I tender a few reasons why 
existing lawn should remain unchanged. Before proceeding, however, I 
will call attention to the exhaustive investigations had before the Com- 
mittee on t !nrporations «>f the Senate during the session of 1873-4, wherein 
tin- management "f the roads passed under most searching review, and 
tin* coat of transportation and travel over the ( 'alifomia roads was <■ mi 
bared « ith the charges for similar service over the principal roads east of 
the Rocky Mountains. I also invite attention to similar inquiries made 
by the Committees of the session of 1871-2. To the showing heretofore 
made by the companies, in defense of our position and management, I do 
pot know that 1 have anything to add, though I am ready to respond to 
II i»f kindi-d character that may be made upon the companies. 

The views 1 now submit will be general in their character, not aa op- 
pH.vd to any particular pending measure, but as questioning the power of 
the Legislature over the subject, and denying the expediency or wisdom 
of action thereupon, if the power exists. I shall endeavor to exercise per- 
il lor, and to be logically correct. Many years active experience in 
tail way construction and management have taught me, if * I were other- 
wise incliued, to respect the rights of individuals severally as well as col- 
lectively, and that it is at all times ill-advised and impolitic for persons or 
Corporations to attempt to maintain a position by sophistry orany specious 
argumentation. 

All experience and nil history teach that governments are stable and 
beneficent in proportion to the security they afford of life, liberty and pro- 
perty ; that security in the exercise of the right to acquire property, and 
Eta legitimate retention by the lawful possessor, is the unerring standard 
by which the value of a government may at all times be tested. Any 
peeling of doubt or uncertainty in regard to personal liberty or the tenure 
of property, begets a corresponding lack of respect for and confidence in 
the State, and these materially tend to idleness, wastefulness and bad citi- 
zenship. 

Great undertakings are made successful through the agency of enter- 
prising citizens aided by commensurate capital. The larger ventures, 
those which usually result in the greatest good to the State in developing 
her resources, assume such proportions that no single individual is willing 
to take the hazards involved. Partnerships have been found inconvenient 
and cumbersome modes of associating and managing a large capital, and 
hence corporations. They seem to be necessary to the execution of great 
undertakings ; and the greater the undertaking the more indispensable 
becomes their agency. 

The citizen in well ordered states is guaranteed in the use and enjoy- 
ment of his property according to his own discretion, provided he does not 
contravene public morals and a sound police policy. The fundamental 
law will not suffer him to be divested of bis goods without due process of 
law, nor disturbed therein without adequate compensation. It has been 
found to be both unwise and unjust to impose embarrassing restrictions 
upon the acquisition or use of property — unwise because it takes away 
the great incentives to industry and economy ; and unjust because its ten- 
dency is to indirect confiscation. 

Capital is permitted and invited to be aggregated for the purpose of 
undertaking great improvements — to facilitate those enterprises on which 
the well-being and even the life of the State may depend. The law per- 
mitting and encouraging such aggregation, specifies the terms on which it 
may be done, the machinery by which it may he operated, holds its 
offenders to a rigid personal accountability, and has pledged the faith of 
the State that such changes in the law as would have a tendency to render 
the investment less secure, shall not be encouraged or permitted. Good 
faith requires that associated dollars shall not be made less stable or less 
productive, by any action of the law, than was contemplated by the law 
when the aggregation was authorized. Good faith requires that indi- 
viduals associated in a common enterprise involving the use of large 
means, should stand on the same plane of security before the law, that 
they occupied before the community of interests was established. If new 
restrictions can he imposed on corporations, affecting them in vital points, 
whereby the income from their investments may be cut down from time 



to time aa shall be dictated by caprice, then the process may be carried on 

until all profit shall he stopped, which would DC confiscation. And who 
shall mark the line dividing the right to abate from productive capacity, 
and confiscation? Who possesses the wisdom requisite to so difficult a 

(Toblem? And why are railroad companies singled out from the great 
»My Of corporations in this State and made the center of attack ? Why 

is not some distinguished capitalist called to the bar of legislative omnip- 
otence, and the rule of his business dealing prescribed for him? Because 
it would be unjust and unstatesmanlike ; because he would invoke in his 
protection the fundamental principles upon which civilized society rests. 
The gravity of this question will be more apparent when we consider that 
there are three hundred and fifty millions of property created, and now 
held by corporations in this State — and that they ramify every interest. 
If this Legislature shall deny by any enactment that there are vested 
rights incorporations, then I imagine that our citizens will not create new 
corporations nor invest in those already organized. 

It will not be denied, that for the proper development of the resources 
of the State and fostering her business interests, the aggregation of capital 
is not only a convenience, but an absolute necessity. In great enterprises 
are associated not only capital, but to be successful, corresponding skill 
and business talent. There is strength in unity of purpose, thought and 
action, as well as in unity of wealth. There will not be the force of com- 
bined ability without community of interest. The rewards of industry 
ought to be the same, whether the citizen works his hands and brain 
standing by himself or in concert with his neighbors. Why should the 
guaranty of protection be less sound in the one case than in the other? 
The State is directly interested in the industry, skill, economy, and enter- 
prise of her citizens. She is interested in their working and productive 
capacity. She reaps no profits from drones, either in production or 
character ; on the contrary, they form the disturbing element in society. 
They challenge the wisdom of the order of things that brings success to 
the enterprising, and clamor for the communistic era. 

But it has been said that corporations abuse their powers and privileges. 
In behalf of the railroad companies represented by me, I deny the state- 
ment emphatically. Our roads penetrate many of the populous centers 
of the State, and we deal largely with the public. It would be indeed 
strange, certainly exceptional, in railroad experience and management, if 
some persons with whom we come in business contact, should not com- 
plain of fancied grievances. It would be too much to expect of human 
nature that it should be otherwise. However, the major part of the com- 
plaints made, emanate from, and are industriously circulated by, persons 
who never have any occasion to deal with the companies, and busy them- 
selves in manufacturing public opinion. But no just grievances are 
brought to the attention of the management with wdiich I am associated, 
that pass unredressed — self-interest, if there existed no other considera- 
tions therefor, would establish such a course of action. 

Perhaps a foundation for justifying legislative interference with railway 
corporations is predicated on the right of eminent domain, set in motion 
for the purpose facilitating the construction of railroads. But this right 
of domain is exercised for the benefit of the State — to facilitate intercom- 
munication between her citizens ; to cheapen transportation and traveling 
expenses ; that her resources maybe developed ; that her agricultural and 
manufacturing interests may be fostered ; that inducements may he held 
out to the people of other States to come and cast their lot with us ; and 
that there may be broad facilities for the rapid interchange of the luxuries 
and neces ;:,ries of civilized life. For the accomplishment of these objects, 
and in her own interest, the State exercises the right of eminent domain, 
but around such exercise has most carefully drawn the shield of the law 
for the protection of the citizen. The State exacts that full compensation 
should be made the citizen of the railroad company at whose instance he 
has been compelled to surrender the use of his property. The citizen 
whose property is thus taken f r jq him by legal force, makes no contribu- 
tion to railroad construction — he is paid by the corporation the full equiva- 
lent for the use of his property. If it is otherwise, it is the fault of the 
legislation. The right granted to the railway is a privilege — or necessity 
— for which the company makus ample recompense, in obedience to the 
law. 

But in proportion to the number of miles of railways constructed in 
this State, the right of domain has been seldom exercised. A very large 
percentage of our roadbeds and depot grounds have been obtained by nego- 
tiation with the owners of the property necessary to be taken. If it be 
said that this percentage is largely due to the concession of the right of 
way through the public lands granted by Congress, then I answer that 
such grant by Congress was upon the condition of certain enumerated ser- 
vices to be rendered by the companies to the United States, which is only 
another mode of making compensation. 

If the property of corporations, or any class of corporations, is to be sub- 
jected to this depreciating process at the will of the Legislature, why not 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 5. 



make compensation, as in the case of the taking of the property of 
the citi2en? I do not deny that the State may condemn the prop- 
erty of railroad corporations; on the contrary, my position is, that it 
may he so, hut not without compensation, as seems to be the theory with 
some. In other words, I maintain that any change in the law which has 
the effect to make money in?ested in railroads less valuable, less remu- 
nerative than it might or could be under the law as it stood at the incep- 
tion of the corporation, is condemnation without compensation, in propor- 
tion to the extent to which it is carried. 

But assuming that the constitutional power exists in the Legislature to 
regulate and control railroad companies, which I do not # concede, is it 
wise, expedient, or necessary to do so at the present time? " The railway 
system of the State is far from being completed. The trunk lines are be- 
ing advanced as rapidly as possible— more rapidly, I think I am justified 
in stating, than the public anticipated. This is particularly noteworthy, 
when we consider the damaging blows that have been aimed at railway 
construction and management, reaching in their effects every quarter of 
the globe. Through the prejudices of the people, appealed to often for 
ephemeral ends, railroad credit has passed through a period of suspension, 
greatly to the injury of California. Still railroad construction has made 
annual progress ; and since the last meeting of the Legislature about four 
hundred miles have been added to the roads of this State. We are now 
seeking to push the Southern Pacific far enough to the southeast as to 
bring the productive provinces of Arizona and !New Mexico into close con- 
nection with our commercial cities. 

Experimental surveys for branch lines have been made and are being 
made, designed to penetrate some of the richest districts, now compar- 
atively inaccessible and unproductive. These are not projected to mislead 
or beguile the public. They are conceived with a view to their early ex- 
ecution. 

Thousands of laborers now find employment in railroad construction 
and thousands* in operating completed roads. As the system develops, 
large additional numbers will be required. 

Within the past two years no State in the Union has accomplished so 
much as California to develop and utilize the slumbering riches of the com- 
monwealth. Apart from the values railroads add to the State in and of 
themselves, as they advance, the properties of the citizens nmltiuly ten 
and twenty fold. Hundreds of thousands of acres that five years ago 
were only valuable as cattle and sheep ranges, and this was the measure of 
their value, are now appropriated to cereals, give a steady reward to in- 
dustry, and homes, surrounded witli the comforts of civdization, to thou- 
sands of good citizens. The tide of settlement has and will keep pace 
with the advance of railroad construction. The prosperity of the State 
has and will keep pace with both. Unfriendly legislation ought not to 
check enterprises productive of such results to the State. Its effects 
would be to intimidate capital and cripple industry ; destroy credit ami 
confidence both at home and abroad, and to create a feeling of insecurity 
fatal to all great undertakings. 

To these considerations so briefly set forth, and kindred ones that will 
be so readily suggested to the reflecting mind, I most respectfully iuvite 
the serious attention of the Legislature. 

My purpose in this communication is to present a few fundamental 
propositions, which may be condensed as follows : 

First — That the benefits to the State flowing from railroad construction 
vastly exceed any advantages that can possibly accrue to the companies, 
by the creation of wealth, by aiding- to develop our mineral, mechanical 
and agricultural resources, and by rendering communication between re- 
mote districts more rapid and inexpensive. 

Second — That it is not for the interest of the State to attach embarrassing 
restrictions upon the use of capital, whether under the control of one or 
an association of her citizens. 

Third — That there are enterprises indispensable to the full development 
of the material interests of the State, that assume such proportions that 
they cannot be carried out without the use and aggregation of large sums 
of money. 

Fourth — That such aggregation has been found by experience to be 
necessary to build up and maintain a railway system commensurate with 
the natural wealth of the State ; and hence the Legislature has authorized 
the incorporation of companies, in pursuance with which the existing rail- 
road companies were organized. 

Fifth— That the State, recognizing the great advantages to accrue to her- 
self through the agency of transportation and traveling facilities, permits 
private property to be condemned and used by the railroad companies, 
they paying the full equivalent therefor. 

Sixth — That the interests of the railroad companies are so intimately 
connected with and depenaent upon the convenience and prosperity of the 
people, that they must subserve the public good to assure their own suc- 
cess. 

But it has been said that the freights and fares charged on the roads in 
Calif o'rnia are exorbitant, extortionate, and that improper discriminations 
are practiced. Without entering into details on this subject, or assuming 
the defensive in this communication, I undertake to say, and am prepared 
to maintain : 

FirH— That the average cost of transportation and travel over the rail- 
roads in this State is no greater than is charged on any of the first- class 
roads on this continent, when the "circumstances affecting the business of 
railroads are fairly considered. 

Second — That the average cost of transportation in California is 3 66-100 
cents per ton per mile, which is 11 34-100 cents per ton per mile less than 
the law, as it now stands, authorizes our companies to charge. 

TAird— That we have endeavored to discriminate in favor, of the min- 
eral, agricultural and mechanical products of this coast. 

Fourth— Thai there are certain expenses denominated fixed expenses, 
such as interest, salaries, the general cost of operating roads, etc., which 
must be provided for from the earnings of the roads; and if the maximum 
now allowed by law be reduced, and be held to be binding, it would be 
necessary to reduce the present rates charged on importations and lux- 



uries, and advance them on the mineral, mechanical and agricultural pro- I 
ductions oi the country, ■ A certain average must be reached, or the roads 
must suspend business. Respectfully submitted. 
January, 1876. Lel.vnd Stanford. 

To the iimoruhh, the Committee on Corporations of the Senate of the State of 
C'llif'iruiit : 

Gentlemen : -I have already made a communication to the Committee 4 
on Corporations of the Assembly, setting forth, somewhat at length, rea- . 
sons why there ought not to be any legislation which would materially af- 
fect the rights of corporations organized under existing laws ; to this I re- 1 
spectfully invite your attention, and now beg leave to submit substantially 
the same views more briefly. 

New legislation that would materially change existing laws to the detri- 
ment of property existing thereunder, necessarily assumes that corpora- 
tions per se have no vested rights ; it also assumes that the property of the ;] 
corporation, and consequently the property of the citizens of the State •} 
who own in corporations, may be taken in whole or in part, without com- ' 
pensation. The vast amount of wealth created and held by corporations 
in this State naturally challenges attention to a subject so important. 

Before the enactment of general incorporation laws, corporations were I 
created by special acts, and necessarily had exclusive privileges, and often ; 
became odious monopolies. The necessity for corporations has long been J 
acknowledged, but the making of them available to all persons who de- 
sired to associate themselves together in a convenient form for the purpose 
of embarking in any undertaking, is of modern invention, and has relieved -j 
corporations of the odious features of monopoly. If it shall now be estab- 
lished that there are no vested rights in corporations, then their agency 
will go into disuse. They seem inseparable, in this age of progress, from 
the development of the business and resources of the country. Common \ 
law partnerships are insufficient to meet the various demands of business. 
Our general incorporation laws impose upon the public no monopoly, be- 
cause they are open to all, and afford a more convenient agency for the 
transaction of business than partnership. The property of the corporation 
is still the property of individual citizens as much as though it was invested 
in an ordinary partnership. Why should this property, the result of the 
enterprise of the citizens, be less secure in the one case than in the other ? 
Why should the one class be denied the rewards of industry, of economy, 
of foresight and enterprise, more than the other?. Is not the State equally 
interested to protect alike all citizens in their persons, their property, and 
their legitimate pursuits ! The State is composed of a community of citi- 
zens, all of whom are interested that each citizen shall employ his time in 
such legitimate pursuit as shall yield to him, and consequently to the com- : 
munity, the greatest reward ; and the success which attends his efforts is 
marked evidence of how far he supplies an immediate want. To limit the 
profits which the citizen, whether mechanic, merchant, agriculturist, pub- 
lic carrier, or when engaged in any other pursuit, may derive from his 
business, must operate primarily as a discouragement to his energy, be- 
cause it fixes a restriction upon his productive capacity. Laws aiming to 
regulate the affairs of individuals are, to a certain extent, attempts to con- 
trol the property of the individual without his concurrence, and probably 
to his injury — control being the essence of ownership — and any legal nega- 
tions that pass beyond the absolute necessities of police purposes are in con- 
flict with the fundamental principles of our G-overnment ; the State is in- 
terested in the uses made of the time, the energies, and the property of its 
citizens. 

The idler is a loss to the State to the extent of the capacity he has for 
production, but which remains unemployed. This is most manifest to 
his immediate neighbors, to whom he could be of most service. The 
State is also interested in the merchant, the farmer, the manufacturer — 
indeed, in the legitimate business of all her citizens ; but she does not un- 
dertake either to prescribe the rides for the management of their business 
nor fix a limit to the profits to accrue 'therefrom. Enterprise should not 
only be left open to the citizen, but he should be encouraged therein ; and 
it will be found in all countries where restrictions and embarrassments are 
imposed upon the people that there the average condition is much worse 
than in those countries where enterprise has a more open field for its de- 
velopment. Then can there be any wisdom in making a distinction be- 
tween citizens associated under the general corporation laws and those not 
so associated ? Wherein is the business of one class less legitimate and 
less entitled to protection than that of the other? Does the State give to 
corporations as such, by the law authorizing their members to associate 
in a corporate capacity, anything but the advantages of organization and 
existence under a law conceived in wisdom and fruitful to meet the wants 
and necessities of civilization and modern expansion? If not, then 
whence comes the reason for an exceptional interference with and regula- 
tion of the rights of property of these citizens '! Why not hold out to 
them as to others the same favorable inducements, and hope that their 
economy, industry, foresight and enterprise shall reap their just reward ? 
It seems to me I might well stop here and await answers to these propo- 
sitions ; but inasmuch as the public attention has been more particularly 
directed to the specific class of corporations known as railroad corpora- 
tions, the inquiry naturally is suggested, Why is it that this more serious 
attempt is made to interfere in the management of their affairs than with 
that of other corporations ? To my mind, an answer would be found in 
that railroads seem to be more largely beneficial in their influences, more 
largely supplying a want, and I may say a necessity, for the varied and 
often conflicting transactions of life than other corporations. 

The companies deal largely with the public ; have transactions -with 
every degree of intelligence, involving amounts within the means of the 
humblest as well as the wealthiest citizen ; the roads have become as 
much a public necessity as a convenience. 

But perhaps this legislative discrimination against railroad corporations 
is assumed more especially because of the exercise of the right of eminent 
domain by the State for the purpose of permitting their construction ; 
but this right is not exercised for the benefit of these corporations, but for 
that of the State. Under the fundamental law, the property of " A" 
cannot be taken for the benefit of "B." The powers of eminent domain 
under which the property of the citizen may be taken can only be exer- 
cised for the benefit of the State, and then only upon just compensation 
being made. After the exercise of this right, and payment has been 



-VI.. 5. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



.■■ Indlrtdual* 

■ 
i fur l»y ill- 

• 

ttiM- t»f : . n tr >m " A liv ill" SLaI<- ami i 

that with that which the company hud 

wtiv piIioiiM not tli> v 111:1k i.' '■"iii|"ii-.tti.'iL i- 'iiiiioh-iir.it'- 

Will ;*nv nil.' prviftul tint tin- piliuiii- .'I" income is no! the 

Tli- |>rinhicii of |>ru|>«rty determines it- 

> unit tli<- n.'lit nf tin' Si it- I property 

►r a public dm on the tarns that it takes the 

I >ut I claim th.it citisens composing a 1 

»li «!1 h"l'l their property »« *»cnhl from oon&acation ai under 

ither ritiiens hold theira. 

there exists the right for the axerobe of *«n»t r- >t over 
U ilitftTcnt in -in that < \-r-i- -I over individual!*, or other corpora- 
it wi-r t-. i|.< so ;it tli-' t i in*- w hen tin- railroad > item of the Sut«- 
in far from being completed : when railroad credit, lately bo seriously im 
■■ recovering ; when there i< no cause nf complaint of the manage- 
when, in fact, tin' average charges f"r business upon 
:- i- !-■" than one-fourth of tin- maximum allowed by the laws au- 
11. and on tin- faith of which tiny are organised : 
liv ileuionstr r:i,jn> oommil I 

■ >>f the >t .it i, a fair consideration nf tli" rircumstanoes .if 
iven, the cheapest railroading in 
n California? If legislative control over tnese 
railnM'l corporations i> t.> Ik- insisted upon as just and necessary, then 
>.-■ ri't'i-' 1- ii -t legitimate; their investors have made a mil 
mid, were it po^tible, withdraw their property and place it where 
: t-i ..iih. in vment would be unquestioned, and the profits from its 
..■■ii by their fellow men : and it i- a mistake to Buppose 
that the public benefit of railroads is sufficient to justify the State, in her 
of eminent domain, to promote their construction. No calling is 
or will In- safe that is t-i excite the oeaselesa effort at control of those who 
v d in it, and the Stat- must pronounce agaiust its pursuit. 
If the ikeu in the Foregoing cannot pe controverted-— and to 

- • investigation I invite the attention of the Committee, and also 
of the public press '•;' tin- State then wherein can be shown any justifi- 
cation for legislation on the subject ? 

It is no answer to say that the people have otherwise instructed their 

mse the people do not exact or desire that any wrong 

or injury shall be inflicted upon any citizen, nor any class of citizens, nor 

that there should be unjust legislative discrimination. Respectfully Bub- 

Leland Stanford. 
January, 1870. 

FROZEN AUSTRALIAN JOINTS. 
If the preservation of raw meat by freezing has not hitherto 

firoved the decided sue. ess the industry deserves, it cannot be said the 
kilure baa been attributable to stinginess of expenditure on the part of 
inists, as recent Australian papers inform us that Mr. Ihonias 
f Sydney, has already lavished £40,000 on preliminary experi- 
ments. Apparently, however, his commercial reward now looms in the 
mstan e with a better defined outline than the prospects of his predeces- 
sors, bis. great establishment at Lithgow Valley having been completed, 
and about t<* commence freezing operations. Ice-making is already con- 
ducted in a curious manner by means of a large copper drum, containing 
I freezing mixture, the lower half of which is immersed in pure water, 
'the drum is caused to revolve rapidly, which aids the process, and the 
boxen water quickly collects in the form of snow on the outside of the 
bright copper, from which it is scraped, and immediately compressed into 
Ice blocks. For preserving meat Mr. Mort has provided two large apart- 
ments, each seventy-five feet square, and about ten feet high, named re- 
spectively the cooling ami freezing chambers, the walls of which are 
Upwards of five feet thick, and whose only opening and entrance is a 
smtll hatch in each ceiling. The precautions to be taken in handling the 
joints, both before and after refrigeration, seem to be of the most sensible 
and prudent description, and augur well for the ultimate success of the 
scheme. We may mention that an experiment of some importance in 
view of our deficient meat supply has been brought to a satisfactory issue. 
During the early part of the past month the steamer Illinois arrived in 
the Mersey from Philadelphia, bringing about 30 dressed beeves, 150 
sheep, and a quantity of poultry, which were placed in a tank in the 
lower hold. The meat was in eight layers, upon iron bars, so that the 
air had free access to it. A blower, run by a five-horse power engine, 
■reed a constant current of air through the ice chests, which circulated 
Ehrough the compartment, and thence drawn back through the blower, 
keeping the meat at a low temperature. The tank in which the meat 
was placed was capable of holding 75,000 pounds. All tbe meat was 
Btated to have been in good condition. — British Trade Journal. 



THE BOY WHO LOVES HIS MOTHER. 

Of all the love affairs in the world, none can surpass the true love of 
the big boy for his mother. It is a pure love and noble, honorable in the 
highest degree to both. We do not mean merely a dutiful affection. We 
mean a love that makes a boy gallant and courteous to his mother, saying 
to everybody plainly that he is fairly in love with her. Next to the love 
of a husband, nothing so crown's a woman's life with honor as this second 
love, this devotion of son to her. And we never yet knew a boy " turn 
out " ba<l who began by falling in love with his mother. Any man may 
fall in love with a fresh-faced girl, and the man who is gallant with the girl 
may cruelly neglect the worn and weary wife. But the hoy who is a lover 
to his mother, in her middle-age, is a true knight who will love his wife 
as much in the sere-leaved autumn as he did in the daisied spring-time. 

Snooting a Cat — It was in Portland of an evening. Three of them 
were killing a cat. One of them held a lantern, another held the cat, and 
the third jammed the pistol in the cat's ear, and fired it, shooting the man 
who was holding the animal on the hand, and wounding the party with 
the lantern in the arm. The cat left as soon as it saw how matters stood, 
and that ill-feeling was being engendered. — Danbur>t News. 



OUR QUACKS. 




The lonjrerwc keep our column'* open to Ins dHruMlon of medical nf- 
nlrs, the mors itarUIng the evidence beoomes that ll lea most daogtrons thins 
la lend fori Doctor In Ban Prancltc loss yon know who yon an ama- 
in : for, in view of the fnrtf that have come to our knowledge, \w fool 
uunred thai we shall he squally wrvlng the profession and our citizens 
eenerally when vra publicly ask certain men: "Have von a diplomat" if 

iln-y have, we will Bjlve Hi.-m an ailvrrli*.-rn.-nt oralis." ll llirv caonol in* 

Bwer the query, tin- conclusion is obvious, and the duly of tnetr patients 

plain. Wo append a ll*tof practicing men I nil men, to whom wenuw put that 
question. We shall add to it from ilnir Ultima 
OtnUemen, You Catt Yourself** Doctor*, 

A.'ivii- ...I K, traveling around. 

Adolphus. Henry, IJ8 WjiHiiinctnn 
" iro, E.8., S I 



Bat* You a Diploma f 
Jodss, ik.- W. 188 Third. 
, Jaiiico,K,91fl Powell 
o*l .v Kearny. Kelly, T B, :m Davis. 



no, 6, sol Third street. " Kn ipp, Rear/. 100 Terrell 

iiiiK.,1 1:, Market and *th, 



1 iv A.DOLPD, Pres't Society 

German Phjiioiaos, '-.' Kearny. 

Antonla.C. IWM Post, 

Ivory, v. n'.'.k; Bash, 

Aid rich, Ktnely, >Wi Market. 
Baldwin, h rt-i 12 1 ilu - 

It wcitorr. W H, trim-line around. 

Blankhah, wm. rnbbs' Hotel, oaki'd. 
Braman, .1 J, traveling aronnd. 

liitf.s' \N. Paul M, drifting nrnund. 

Brown 1, (colored). ti-JT Union. 

Bchrena, H C F, 742 Market. 

Hkuo, c, -its California. 

Barter, A B. Hi O'Farrell. 

Brows, W Luther, . m Washington. 

Bordenwal, .1 . S18 st nekton. 

Breed, S F, 80 O'Parre'. 

Barach, — .252 Minna, 

Bryant. C G, 5j2 Taylor. 

BitANOB m:i>. H, BMwiiv, n'r Stockton. 

BnNN,Jons K, ■-':'' K'-ufny. 

Bakbat. John, 010 pacific. 

Sennet, Wm. 4S3 Sixth. 

BRBDULL, A R G,212l Mission. 

Broadbent, O R. AuzcruiB House, S Jose 

Bailey, ?. iiJt Tehama. 

Burke, G.r.ii, Sutter. 

Bltlier, G W,r,;i S;i<ramento. 

Bnrr.C.li'S Third. 

Bruck, A. Santa Crer. 

I'.ink, A S.'J-Jl Po*t. 

Cook, C A, 281 Post. 

Carr. A L, 48S Bush. 

Cnh 111, — . 106 Stockton. 



Kelle) . — '. .ii, .tn-. 't"v ( niT,,,, oaki'd. 

l.u^'.'inh. eh:,., c^u-iok Institute, li'j'l 

I'lny Btieet, 
•Lyford, Beo v, vtt Kearny. 
Looscheld, Rev W. Klin « lo Germany. 
LTTSBLBKI, I.. MS Pin--. 
Lriu.i.sKi. M I,, !»»-, [''o|(oni. 

Logan, LF, in.". Market. 
Leavltt, \. % 1 Geary. 
Martin, M P. ii:n t-'oisom. 
M.vthkw, Clauescf.. 71 Fourth. 
Maxwell, .1 s, inci ice rated 

Meyer, A W, m i Kearny 

Miner, H N.S.W. Kearny and Jackson. 
MOREENCvJoSE M.4li)i T-nama. 
Morton, Wm n^JFol""-' 
Meyer, Siegfried, traveling around. 

Mutciilf, , yii) Frsinklln, Oakland. 

MrGov«BW ( CO, ll Post. 

MiSiuirr.'n. Archibald, travel'? aionnd. 

Mayon, T H, Alhambra ThtUcr Itulld- 

lng.310 Bush. 
Mott. N AC,: O'Farrell. 
Murphy, N S, 331 Kearny. 
Mukro, Geo F t 10 Post. 
Mason,.! H,«3 Fifth. 
Meuhicks. A, intvchni; round, 
Marshall, M V. (colored), si-.i Jackson/ 
Morton, Albert. 11 O'Farrell. 

Maynard, .71 Fourth. 

Mathews, I M, 3H Russ. 
Merril, A P, to O 'Parrel. 
McG'oncahy. S W. iufi California. 



|'i,m;k,.1imix Kn.gone to Healrlsburg. Newton. . I'll, travelinc aronnd 
cius,., w X, (cx-Pollceman),KWMi66'n. Noble, W B. KussHoubc. 
Corbett, — .2H2 Pacific. 



Czapkav, L J, traveling aronnd. 
Cohen, Simon. (" old clo"), 105 Kearny. 
Clapp, G H, (Farmer). Sonoma. 
Deaxe, C T, cor. Montg'y and Sutter. 
Oolierty, Wm K.61!) Clay. 

Dwyer, Joseph, am Pacific. 

Davis, M. iu:is Mission. 

Dunhip, A W, 138<lth. 

I)e Belzon, M, traveling around. 

Dunning, O.S.W. .htckson & Saneome. 

Dodge, K E.beef kniicker, 123 Ellis. 

•Draper, C F. alias Fox, Oakland. 

Demarest, J D.6l7Commercial. 

Eiehers, J,;"»07 Union. 

Eckel. J N,:«5 Geary. 

Earl.M R.S2 1 Second. 

Elmore, A C, 10-.:! Washington. 

Ewing, E, til! Fell. 

Bophrat, Fred (Peddler), Los Angeles. 

Estf.x, J, 108 Stockton. 

FERBI6, A S, mat'ess-mak'r. 8'2 How'd. 

Elcliler, , cor OnkiRRav, Ala'da 

Fischer, Geo., (laborer), 814 Stockton. 

FlSOHEB, GtJSTAT, 501 Fell. 

Ferdi'iiandt-rz, Manuel, 215 Kearny. 

Frankenberg J (Shoemaker), tfilPost. 

Flnigan, H, 345 Jackson. 

Foxskca, D L, traveling around. 

Flllino-e.D C (col'd cook) .:v±a Third. 

Fanterbang, Sam. Ki5 Pacific. 

French, K C, 4RI Minna. 

Fichtner, Gastave, gonclo N. York. 

Fic-li'ner, Charles, . "01 Fell. 

Gaiidaxowsky, A E, 1053 Broadway, 
Oakland. 

Gibbon, J F.cor. Commerc'l & Kearny. 

Gilbert, John F, 72'.' Broadway. 

Gregorlo, A. -itravellnn round. 

Gales, Dan Virgil. 60S Sac'trf. 

Grover. A J, 408 Bush. 

Gobs, w. li Third. 

Holland, Gustave, late Hospital Stew- 
ard, 413 Bush. 

Hatch, Hknrv, alias H W (rag-gath- 
erei). drifting around. 

Hkll, S Hastixgs (alias Sam), ffll Cal. 

Holtz, Paul F," French Cook," drift- 
ing about. _ 

Hodgdon, C L, 10G3 Howard. 

Hastings, Alonzo Tom, Peddler. 

Halle, Richard B, 134M Post. 

Handt, C 0,8 Kearny. 

Hiller. D A.22'iPost. 

Hogle.G, N.W. Jackson & Stockton. 

Yic^n,, , Park street, Alameda. 

H:irtman. A, 1123 Stockton. 

Ilollister, G W, \\ Montgy. and Onkland. 

Hoffman. Mrs AM, 1122 Folfiom. 

Howard. \V (colored barber), 1159 Mis- 
sion street. 

Hlller, F, Senior, 224 Post. 

Horn,Jerome.S04 Post. 

Jordan - , Louis J, 211 Geary. 

Josselvn.BenJ F.(;is Sacramento. 

Jones, Wm, cnr. New Montg i Natoma. 

,1-isskly.v. J H.2J; Sutter. 



O'Neill, Howaed D,:0l Front. 

O'Don.vell, C C, 825 Kearny street. 

Owens, Evan, traveling around. 

Parsons, Lorenzo, 54i2d. cor. Brnnnan 

PBOSBK, JOSEPH, Assistant Physician 
German Hospital. 51:1 Third. 

Pboschold, C, 113 Third. 

Pinehard. J B (Bartender), 1" Third. 

Pliley, E i;,s:T> Wnt-hiiiL'ton. 

Porter. D C, 43 1 Clementina. 

Qcixlin. AG, lsTlilrd. 

Ouerllleeq, M. 111!) Mission. 

Klchard, P. J, traveling around 

Knssel, E F. r. Post. 

Rappln, G, 1517 Stockton. 

Kapt'iv.FG. travePg round In Idaho. 

Randolph, P B, 141 Minna. 

RoyerLC (harncsp maker), Idaho. 

IiErrENSRVRfiEn. Jacob. Assistant Phy- 
sician German Hospital, 112 Powell. 

Regal. COT. T7fi Howard. 

Roll, John, S3:» Pacific. 

Roberts, Mrs. H, 10 Sixth. 

Howell, Wm P, 23 Stone. 

Sbeley.C M,.'!is Fourth. 

ScnoENBEnG.G. 1315 Powell. 

Sherman, J AJMO Montgomery. 

StuttmciHter R (Tanner), 109 Dupont 
and 1H13 Powell. 

Rhkkrmer, H.iill Webster, Oakland. 

Schonwald, Franz-. 85, Third. 

Sanders, D, lOiR^ Dupont. 

Sznrvash. AST, 1329 Dupont. 

Szctskl, Judas, fW4Picfllc. 

Smith, E D, 5i3 Kearnv. 
I Stowe, C M. 410 Kearny. 

Seller, Edward. 503 Davis. 

Sposati, N, Stockton. 

•Summers, H A M, 776 Howard 

Talt, J G, niMlnna. 

Tilton, J. R., 1245 Mission. 

•Thomas, Gko. F. traveling round. 

Trask, J B, 542 Market. 

Tozer, Charles H, < lakland. 

Thiese, A A, R0S Sutter. 

Treat. J \s W,523 Kearnv. 

•Tbompaon, Wm (alias " Old Dr. T.") 14 
Gear}'. 

ITtcer, Henry, 18'iJS Post. 

Vigoureaux, A W, corner 3d A Mission. 

Valentine. C H ("col'd cob'rj 325K 4th. 

Vasl!l,FS.S08 Kearny. 

Von Kaismer, C, bootblack, 763 Folsom. 

Vandenberg, Jr, — , drifting round. 

Wright, J v7, s Kearny. 

Wilson, Wm, 653 Howard. 

Wilson, H Roberts. 29 Minna & Oaki'd. 

Weber. John, 1717 Mason. 

Warrkn, O P, corner Broadway and 
Telegraph av, Oakland. 

Williams, H, 630 Mission. 

Wliherby, L. 23 Fell. 

Watt, W A. 22; Second. 

Wilkins, T J, 815 Bush. 

Wllley, Jack.3il Sixth. 

White, SS, 2213 Larkin. 

Whitmore, D W,60i Pine. 



Josselyn, W H.S03 Third. 

Those persons whose names appear In small capitals claimed to have dlplo 
mas from Institutions whose officers re pudiate those claims. 

•Has a diploma from the Quack Medical School of Philadelphia, that 
sold them. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 5. 



BIZ. 



The first month of the year has passed, and we have yet no con- 
siderable revival in business circles to record. In fact, January has been 
a dull month in all trade departments and, for the most part, unsatis- 
factory to business men in general. It is singular that our people should 
complain of a plethora of Silver Coin in the community, but this is true, 
nevertheless, and Silver Trade Dollars — and Half-Dollars — have really 
become so plentiful that the discount thereon has become burdensome to 
traders in general, causing those who are compelled to take them in pay- 
ment of small debts as to eat up a large share of their profits on goods 
sold. What is now the remedy ? Since the war, the States of California, 
Oregon and Nevada have alone adhered to specie payments, while all the 
rest of the United States have been trading in Rag Money as their only cur- 
rency. Of course this greatly circumscribes the use and circulation of 
Silver Coin, while the production of this fractional Silver Currency has 
rapidly accumulated and has even now become quite a drug on the Pacific- 
Slope. The remedy is to be found alone in the resumption of Specie pay- 
ments at once and without delay. This matter is very clearly elucidated 
in the Commercial Herald of this week, from which we copy : 

Residents of the Pacific Coast are not a little disturbed in reference to 
the discount on Silver, its cause, and when, if ever, it will probably cease 
or be confined within certain reasonable limits. The reasons advanced 
and the measures proposed to remedy or modify this rapid decline in the 
value of silver are as various and numerous as can well be conceived. In 
our opinion there is but one cause, and one way to avert its progress. The 
adoption of a rag money postal currency, to harmonize with the greenback 
and national bank note system of all the Union except the Pacific States, 
naturally drove all denominations of silver coin from that extensive mar- 
ket, confining their use to a comparatively very small section of the coun- 
try, and particularly that section in which silver is one of the most abun- 
dant natural products. The constantly increasing yield of silver from our 
numerous mines, and the unearthing of a bonanza announced to be worth 
anywhere from §300,000,000 to 3700,000,000 more, pouring their glittering 
treasures upon a single and already well supplied market, together with 
the demonetization of silver by several European Governments and its dis- 
use in the Atlantic States, naturally created a glut which is now pressing 
itself upon public attention with considerable vehemence. The coinage of 
Trade Dollars was resorted to as a means of utilizing the surplus in the 
China trade, and was successful for a time; but China and India — those 
heretofore insatiable consumers of silver — appear to have at length be- 
come satisfied. The proximity of California, the great source of supply, 
and the facilities offered by regular steamship intercourse, have convinced 
the Orientals that they can obtain all the silver they may need at the 
shortest notice, and their greed for hoarding this metal, formerly difficult 
to obtain, has come to an end. So much for the causes. Nothing that we 
are aware of can stop the rapid decline in the value of silver except the 
resumption of specie payments. When the millions of rag postal currency 
shall again be compelled to give place to the silver coinage of the country, 
when every man, woman and child, from one end of the Union to the 
other, shall once more be permitted to deal in hard cash, and not until 
then, silver will be accorded a much more permanent value than it can be 
at present by any other process. The idea, so often advanced, that a 
restoration of silver coinage would eventuate in its absorption by other 
peoples, is simply absurd. They are not over-anxious for it now; it is not 
probable they would be then, and if they should, so much the better, as 
they would furnish additional and valuable markets for the consumption 
of our growing surplus. 

The Bag market has of late shown considerable activity, resulting 
in purchases here and to arrive of some (5) five million or more of Burlap 
Grain Sacks — more than half this quantity being Calcutta made Bags, 
22x36 — standard size. The price of these Bags has been steadily advanced 
from 10 to lie, until sales this week for forward delivery have actually 
been made at ll£@ll|c., usuaL credit, and the price now advanced to llAc 
for invoice lots. The quality of the Calcutta goods is thought to be pre- 
ferable to those from Dundee, and the result promises to be the total an- 
nihilation of the English trade with us in Grain Sacks and Hessian piece 
goods. 

Borax continues to be in fair request for Eastern and foreign account, 
with sales during the week of 60 tons Concentrated, from second hands, 
private, quotable at 7@7£c. Refined in cases is held at 9$@.9hc. 

Coffee. — Imports per Constitution from Central American ports, 1,138 
bags only — a much less quantity than was expected. Sales during, the 
past fortnight, in lots of 2,000 bags, within the range of -20i@22c, 

Coals. — With lessened supplies from Australia, and few cargoes en 
route, prices have risen to S10 25 a .$10 50. Liverpool has also advanced 
to the same figures. Lehigh, on the contrary, has declined to §12 a §=15 
from ship and store respectively; Cumberland, $18 a S22 for bulk and 
cask respectively; British Columbia Coals, $10 a $11; Seattle, $9 26 a 
§0 50 ; Coos Bay, £10 ; Mt. Diablo, §6 25 a $8" 25 for Fine and Coarse re- 
spectively. 

Quicksilver. — The steamship Great Republic for China and Japan car- 
ried upwards of 1,500 flasks, making our total exports for January to 
date 4,014 flasks, against 821 same time last year. The price here is 60c. 
per pound ; in London, £11 per bottle. California produced in 1875 53,- 
700 flasks ; in 1874, 32,000 flasks. Showing a wonderful increa. 

Sugar. — Imports for the week have been insignificant, and our stocks 
of all sorts waning rapidly. We quote Hawaiian Grocery Grades 8 a 
lie; China, 9al0ic. ; California Refined, 12al2ic. ; Yellow and 
Golden, 10 a lie. 

Wines. — Our exports in January 36,350 galls., against 22,700 in same 
time last year. Advices from Chili state that Henry Gerke, of this city, 
obtained the first premium at the Chilian Exposition. 

Teas. — The O. and O. steamship Belgic has arrived from the Orient 
since our last with 2,S50 pkgs., chiefly Japans, for this city ; 10,100 pkgs. 
for New York and other Eastern cities. The same to go forward by Pa- 
cific Railroad. 

Exports. — Our exports of Breadatuffs continue upon a Liberal scale. 



Since July 1?t, 1875, to February 2d, we have sMpped to all ports 
282,000 bble Flour, against 301,000 bblfi same period of the year previous. 
Of 'Wheat the exports for same period, 1875-6, aggregate 4,648,000 ctls; 
1874-5, 6,584,000 ctls. The aggregate cash value of our Wheat and Flour 
to the United Kingdom for the harvest year as noted— 1875-6— amounts 
to §10,355^00; 1874-5, 810,367,300; 1873-4, 914.3:36,250: 1872-3, 812,600,- 
000. We nave now some fifteen ships on the United Kingdom berth, to 
load Wheat. These, with what has already gone forward, swells this sea- 
son's shipments up to 300,000 tons— and how much more is to go forward it 
is difficult now to state, as Seeding time has not yet passed and the quan- 
tity left for consumption none can tell with any degree of accuracy. The 
present price of Wheat is §1 80al 95, the latter an extreme price "for Ex- 
tra choice. 

Barley. — There is a good local demand for Feed, at §1 22^al 25 f ctl; 
Brewing, SI 30wl 35 }$ ctl. 

Oats command S2n2 25 ^ ctl. 

Hops.— The supply is free and the demand light, price nominal at 10® 
15c, as extremes. 

Hides.— The supply of Dry is free, at 13(5150.; Wet Salted, 6<S7£c. 

Tallow.— There is a good demand at 6&@7£c for Crude. 

WooL — We have no stock of moment pending the receipt of the 
Spring Clip. Burrv, 9@llc ; Free, 12.\@14c for Short Staple. The best 
Northern Clip 16@17Ac. 

Butter.— Fresh Grass Roll iB very plentiful at 22i@28c. The Best 
Table Butter in the market is only 30c. 

Potatoes.— The supply is liberal, at SI 25@1 75 $? 100 lbs, according 
to quality. 

Onions- — The range of the market is 75c to SI 25 ^ 100 lbs. 

Beans are plentiful and cheap, at lf@3£c, the latter for Bayos. 



ARE THEY_ QUACKS? 

' When patients comes lo I, 

I physics, bleeds and sweatB 'em ; 
Then, ST they choose to die. 
What's that lo I— I let's 'em."—!. Lettsom, 1770. 

Gentlemen, You Call Yourselves Doctors. Have You a Diploma? 

tMoore, D. C. N.E. Post «fc Kearny. 

tMoore, Ellen. South Sim Francisco. 

Preshaw, R. G., on th»? wins, 

Preehau-. Mrs. S. G., on the wing. 

Piquet. E.,cor. Wnsh'n and BrenhamPl. 

Pratt, P., with "King of Pain." 

Pprey, D , nn the wing. 

Rutlet, J. H., nostrum peddler, 145 
Mission and 405 Kearny. 

Eowe, J. L.. 220 Third. 

Rabagliati, N., 819 Montgomery. 

Reed, Amhrose M.. B'dwny &2&1. O'fed. 

Ren ken, Henry. 9th &B'dway, Oakland. 

Rider, *'red, 504 Bush. 

Steele. Emrm, 50li Third. 

Stcrman, Ben*.. 649 Howard. 

-rStnith, Barlow J.. «35 California. 

Snrkizer, . traveling about. 

Spinney, A. B., 11 Kearny. 

Steinhart, P-, 425 Kearny. 

Simmons, alias Curl. 777 Market. 

Tirlcmon, , 405 Kearny. 

Thomsen. N. L., 74 Fonrtb. 

Trask, Edw., Nnclens Hotel. 

+Truesdcll, A. P., on the wlbjr. 

*Van Den Bergh, J. P. P., Mission be- 
low Third. 

Van Den Brrgh, Albert. 

Vandenherjrh. L. C, Tlii Montgomery. 

Wood. Wm. H.,61S«ond. 

Walker, Mart K. ( 110 Sixth. 

Woods. J. H., Lick House. 

White, Elijah, 17 Third. 

Webber. B., 828 Kearny. 

Wolff, Mhs, graduate Sing; Sing Prison 
419 East. 

Yeaton, George A., alias Henry Clay 
Wilkins. BigamtBi, WuWonvilJe. 

Yoong. J. C, t>lS Sacramento. 



Allen, H. R., 

Anderson, R. C„ 40S 3d and 1S&H Mis'n. 

Avechiga, Vincent, Green above K'rny. 

Burr, Agnes, 131 O'Farrell. 

Baronidis, G. W.. 518 Green. 

tBartlett, Mrs. A. W. M.. 29 O'Farrell. 

JBlach, Carl, 514 Kearny. 

Cowan, Robert H., 207 Kearny. 

Clawson, J. W. C, gone lo Arizona. 

Chapman, C. B., 824 Montgomery. 

Crooker, M. J., 821 Market. 

Curtis, Alvah. Oakland. 

Cobb, A. J., 7th street, Oakland. 

Cornell, Janon L. $26 K earn v. 

Chamberlain, B. A., 709 Mission. 

Evans, T. \V., 473 7th st, Oakland. 

Eaton, E. B. 

Evory, A. P.. part nostrums, 008 M'ket. 

Flattkrt, Jonathan, Gov't House, 
Washington and Saneome. 

Fish, L. vV„ lOti Stockton. 

Gottschalk, Marv, 615 Larkin. 

Hendee, M. J., Mission and Third. 

Hobbs, — , Los Anseles. 

Hill, A. B., 137 Montgomery. 

Hill, R. B-, on the wing. 

Holwi?, Friedrich, N.E. Polk & Jackson. 

Joscelvn, W. Robert, 118 Post. 

Joscelyn, Aldrich, 118 Post. 

Johnson, P. T., 104 Kearny. 

Krocbolm, . 

Koon, J. M., Grayson, Cal. 

Lanszweert, Louis. 406 Fourth. 

Maxwell, , 114 Geary. 

Miliken. A. Redwood City. 
Mayer. H. E., " French " nostrum ped- 
dler, 7 Geary. 
McBride, J. J., etc.. 534 Market. 
Moore, S., 31 Second. 
Miller, J. A., Ilaywards. 
♦Claims a diploma from the Quack Medical School of Philadelphia, that sold them. 
tClaims diplomas from the Hygeio Therapeutic Water Cure College in New York. 
For Carl Blach's " qualificaiions," see the News Letter of November 27th. His 
name will he removed from the above liat as soon as he has the regular diploma. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October 19th, 1875.] 

Sure death to Squirrels. Rats, Gophers, etc. For sale by all 
Druggists, Grocers and General Dealers. Price, 91 per box. Made by -T AME S 
G. STEELE &. CO., San Francisco, Cal. Liberal discount to the Trade. Aug. 21. 

ELLIS RFAD. 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

June 12.] 310 Clay Street San Francisco. 

CASTLE BEOTHEBS— [EatabliEhed, 1850.] 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, \os. 313 aiid 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 

CONCENTRATED GREEN TURTLE. 

Put up in cans of 3 1-3 Pouuds and warranted to keep. For 
sale by RjDGLKS, MEYER & CO. November 27. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO.. 
YTTholesale Auction House. 304 and 306 California street. 

T T Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 a si. Cash advances on consign, 
ments. Dec. 14. 



! 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BONO 
to in<- When «i!l in v Lover oomt t«> mo! 

1 vt waited for bin 
in pale, -divvy Andnoi irinhnhawt 

By musk ■■! uu tons \ 
. fond, tofood, For I have lt«pt it oil far him 
\\ i, Mr pun-, my virgin love, 

Then vs.. nl. 1 f >it beard* btan there, An. I I bow told it to the waves 

him, oil inv own, And to too -tan above. 

When will in to nu Whoa will my lover come to ma I 

Down by the river ardo, I roll*. Mv boorl boa weary grown : 
Wli.-r- .T.mlSt Lawrence sweUiaad Tin- olaaTrfng anna to circle me 

In oil it." nwrt and pride ! Mual be mi mu alone, 

Where proud the stately steamer* ride Hi- lipe alone my own may pram 

Upon its emerald I ther lip- I'M scorn ; 

There would I -it me by the aide And lii* the eyoa t" (rate in mine 

uf him 1 love tli* At noon, at night and morn. 

When will my lover come t<> me! 

< >h, can bii hi art be cold ! 
Know* ho that never other hand 
■ us my hand shall hold ! 
Oh, oould he linger it he knew 
My heart's Fond, wild desire, 
And that it burns alone for him 
With Love's sweet, deathless tire? 

— Sarah S. Lewis. 

MONETARY AFFAIRS 

There is at present no Felt s-.ui-.ity of money in the several banking 

reservoirs of the city. The eouimomal hanks are accommodating their 

regular customers at 1(5 11 percent, per month, while the savings hanks 

ami loan societies are lending freely upon real estate, bunds and other 

» securities at '.'" L2 per cent, per annum. The superabundant 

supply of silver coin has caused the discount thereon to be advanced to 

r cent., while Mexican dollars rule still higher, and the latter no 

circulate union:.' the pe"pl>\ h- in,' taken by traders at only 90 cents 

on the dollar. Some of dot wholesale jobbers now discriminate between 
gold and silver by making a price for each, regulating the rate of mer- 
chandise to .-nit the purchaser, the mutter being left optional with the 
latter. Leading merchants in all departments never offer silver in pay- 
ment of hills, hut invariably pay the face of the bill in gold; others try 
to force 5 t<- 10 per cent, silver in payment. Within a week past the Pro- 
duce Exchange, Chamber of Commerce and others have taken hold of 
this silver question in right good earnest, but to little propose, as the vol- 
nme of silver is mcreaaing so rapidly as to be beyond their reach, We 
see that a Washington street grocer offers to take silver coin at par for 
goods purchased, and to allow 5 per cent, premium on gold. The only 
remedy is for the nation to resume specie payments for legal tender cur- 
rency. 

Overland forwardinga of treasure, by express, for the week ending Feb. 
2d, were $213,915 88mlver bars, $57,059 10 gold bars, and $1:10,000 gold 
Coin— total, $400,975 07- Customs absorbed &56,922,|agavjiBt|$109,292 last 
week. Steamer Constitution, from Panama January 29, brought 852,073 
treasure ; steamer Newbum, from Mexican ports, brought 692,471 in 
pressure. 

The shipments of gold coin overland, by express, since January 1st, 
1870, have been as follows : 

January 1st to January 0th §305,500 

January 6th to January 13th 360,000 

January 13th to January 20th 341,707 

January 20th to January 27th I 153,302 

January 27th to February 4th 130,000 

T.-tal §1,290,509 

Same period, 1875 - 686,894 

Increase this year §603,675 

The official exports of Treasure from January 1st to date have been as 
follows : 

Jan. 1 to Feb. 3— Overlaud to New York §2,085,190 27 

January 4— Per City of Pekiug to China 226,797 97 

January 15— Per Montana to Germany §6,201 01 

To Central America 3,000 00 

9,201 01 

January 18— Per Oceanic to China 147,646 05 

February 1— Per Great Republic to China, 147,446 00 

Total since January 1st, 1876 §2,606,280 30 

Corresponding period, 1875 2,590,342 84 

Increase this year §25,937 46 

The above table does not include the amounts of treasure sent through 
the United States mails. 

The duties paid at the Custom House in this city, from January 26th to 
date, have been as follows : 

January 26 : §15,740 61 

January 27 - 35.875 78 

January 28 '. 27,925 84 

January 29 , 21.087 10 

January 31 ! 24,076 61 

Previously in January , 454,684 91 

In January §579,390 85 

February 1 32,216 49 

Total since January 1, 1876 §311,607 34 

Corresponding period, 1875 558,974 07 

Increase this year §52,633 27 



uner Great Republli 
■ v 1st, wen ai I'll- 

TO BOtrOKO 

Chinamen, trad.' dollars V117.897 ihj 

» 'hinum.ii, Mexican dollars 

Chinamen, gold coin 1,818 00 



Total $147. 1 16 <«> 

Our treasure exports, by boh and express, for the month of January, 
1878 '"'. oompare as foil 

T-. 187ft. 

New York $940,438 

China 819,824 

England 15,587 

Honolulu 10,000 

Germany 

Central America 4o.ow 

Mexico 6,000 



1878, 
874,443 



6,201 

3,000 



Totala 11,831,794 $2,392,198 

The comparative deseri pti on. s by above table were ax follows : 

1875. L876. 

Silver Bars §525,958 §775,989 

Trade dnllunt 644,540 182,402 

Mexican dollars 122,177 60,248 

Gold coin 524,089 1,231 ;-7l 

Gold dust 4,421 1,990 

Gold bars 119,500 

Silver coin 10,000 500 



Totals §1,831,794 §2.392,198 

Our merchandise and treasure exports (excluding value of merchandise 
forwarded via railroad) compare as follows : 

Months. 1875. 1870. 

Mdse. Treasure. Mdse. Treasure. 

January §2,040,130 §1,831,794 §2,392,198 §1,956,016 

LATEST PRICES OF IMPORT AND EXPORT STAPLES. 



JIKTALS. 

Pit? Iron, Scotch, No.l... 
Bar Iron, assorted, $» lb.. 
Metal Sheathing.* it..... 
Tin Plates, 1 C, 9 box.., 
Tin Plates. I X.Vbox... 

Lead, Pig, '# It. 

Lead, Sheet, # » , 

BancaTin, ?' ft 

Quicksilver... 

COAL. 

West Hartley, *ton 

Australian 

Cumberland 

Anthrarlte , 

BelliiitfliMin Bay 

Mount Diablo 

coffee. 

Guatemala, # lb 

Java, Old Government.. 

Manila 

Costa Rica 

BICE 

China, No. 1, *» lb _ 

China, No. 2 

Hawaiian 

WINES. 

Champagne, $ doz 

Port, according tobrand 

* gallon 

Sherry, do. do 

OIL. 
Coal and K'-mncne , 



10 SO @ 

9 SO @ 

— t) @— (■> 
@ — 10 

— 25 @ — 2(i 

— 60 @ - 

10 00 @ 11 01 

10 00 @ 10 50 

18 0j @ 22 00 

14 00 ® 16 00 

5 50 @ 

6 25 @ 8 50 

— 20 @ — 21 

— 28 @ — 23 

— 21 & 

-21 @-22 



— 5 @ — ». 

- 7 @— ?> 

20 00 @2fi00 

@ 6 75 
@ 7 00 



2 00 
1 75 



25 <a - 



SO 



TEAB. 

1 n pans 

Oolong , 

3PGAB8. 

China, No. l.» lb 

Sandwich Ishmd 

Manila 

Crushed, American 

M usco vudo 

Peruvian , 

CANDLES. 

Sperm Wax,* lb 

Adamantine , 

SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS. 

Whisky, Aint-i lean 

Wlllskv, Scotch 

WhlBky Irish 

Alcohol, American 

limn, Jamil lea , 

Urandy, French 

BAGS AND DACIOIXG. 

Chicken Gunnies 

Gunny Bags in bales 

Burlap Bags 

Hessian, 40-inch, $> yard. 

DOMESTIC STAPLES. 

Wool. $ lb 

Tallow 

HideB 

Wheat, 9 loo ibs 

Barley 

Oats 

Flour. $ l'Jfi Tbs 



PRICES. 

$— TO @ — 50 

- 45 & - 55 

- 9 @— 10}* 

- 8 ®— 11 

- 7 ®- 1% 

- \2<g>— 12 1 -. 

- @- 7 

- 8 @ — 

- 80 @ — 42 

- UK® - 17H 

2 25 @ 5 50 

5 00 @ 5 50 

5 00 @ 5 50 

2 25 @ 2 40 

4 50 @ 5 25 

4 00 @ 10 00 

- 16 ®— 17 

- li) @- 11 



— 9 @— 17 

— 7 .s>- 1% 

— 13 @— 15 
I 75 ® 1 95 

1 25 @ 1 33 

2 00 @ 2 25 
4 50 (3) 6 00 



MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 



ROBERT KENNEDY NFTTAIL, 

Consulting Surgeon and Physician. 



October 2. 



Ml, <;■ arv street, office hour, l(i a.m. daily. 



A CARD. 

Jir. Klallarri. Physician, u.lt.. London ; Mt.R.CP., Ion- 
« don; M.R.C.S., England. Fjrmerly Physician to the Great Northern Hos- 
pital and St. George's Dispensary, London. S.E. corner of Post and Kearny, en- 
trance on Post. Office hours from 12 to 3. Special appointments at any hour. 
[Novembei <'•. | 

DR. GEORGE C. MATTHEWS, 

Licentiate Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland; I.. R.C.I*. 
and L.M., Edinburgh, lately Intern Rotunda Lying-in Hospital, Dublin. No. 
322 11th street, Oakland. Office Hours, y to 10 a.m., 1 to 2 p.m., 7 to !) p.m. Dec. 11. 

DR. L. V. EVGLEHARD, 
• >,")•> Kearny street, Consulting- Physician and Surgeon. 

•3.-^eJ Specialties : Eye, Ear, Throat and Skin Diseases. Office Hours : 12J to 



2 J and 4$ to 5£ p.m. 



Nov. 20. 



H 



DOCTOR ANDREI 
as returned from Europe, and may be found at his office, 

er the Clay Street Savings Bank. Dec 11. 



PHYSICIAN, SIRGEON AND ACCOIFCHEUR, 

J. 3. AUEREACH, M.D., 
March 13. 310£ Stockton street, San Francisco. 



D 



NOTICE. 
r. A. J. Bowie has resumed the prnctice of his profession. 

Office, 022 Clay street. Office Hours from 10 A.M. to 3 P.M. Sept. 27. 



N. MILLER, M.D., 
Inysician, Oakland. Oflice, 1004 Broadway ; Residence, 364 

Eighth street. October 2. 



DE. J. P. M03KLAB. 
23 Post street. Office Hours, 11 AM to 2 P.M. 



Oct. 16. 



6 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 5. 



LIES OF THE DAY — Continued from News Letter. 

Legislative Lies. — It is not true that Pierson is called the brilliant 
solitaire of the theater goers.— —That Secretary Beck fails to find the 
necessary adhesive element in the mucilage bottles.' '■' — That he is very po- 
lite.— That he learned it from Drury. -=— That Drury runs the Secretary 
of State's office yet.— —That there are 4,000 names on a petition against 
the Bancroft Bill.— That Murphy, of Del Norte, writes his speeches and 
commits them.— That Bagge is the orator of the House.— —That there 
was a question of veracity between Malone and several members of the 
House. — That the defeat of Love's bill caused a demoralization in the 
lobby.— That Sergeant says Mr. Speak-w-e-r. — —That Gelwick's voice 
requires tuning up.— That there are two spuds in the House— Murphy, 
of Del Norte, and Murphy, of 'Frisco.— —That the Sergeant-at-Arms of 
the Senate uses a box of boot-blacking a day on his head. —That Rogers 
attends balls nightly, and forgets to change his vest in the morning.— 
That McKeuna would make a gopd preacher.— That Wetherell is Chair- 
man of the Committee on Elections.— —That Hopper, the contestory with 
Biggs, has kept Wetherill supplied with the juice.— ^That the young ones 
of the House get away with the old ones on the Love Bill.— That Lewis 
is a little subdued.-^— That McG-arvey " sent Sallie off " on Sunday last. 
That the member from Tehama took his Copying Clerk with him 
when he left town on Friday of last week.— That Mrs. K. K., of the 
Engrossing Clerk's Office, exercises a motherly influence over the young 
Becks.— That the hair on the top of Carson's head is very thin.— That 
Murphy, of San Francisco, busies himself keeping his finger nails in or- 
der.— That the Copying Clerk's Office of the Senate is dubbed " the 
harem."— That Harris, of Modoc, ever saw it. — — That Tom Shakelford 
talks through his nose. That Lewis was the friend who requested Hart 
to introduce the resolution to remove the Chronich reporter. That the 
only article published in the newspapers this year in favor of Lewis was 
written by himself, and published in a newspaper that he controls.— 
That Meyer Heustis has become a Democrat. That Carson belongs to 
a fire company in Sacramento.— That his rooms are worse than the 
Union. -^That the notice in the Directory spoiled Harding. —That 
Hamilton and Selkirk are the sameperson. That in consequence Hamil- 
ton has to pay Selkirk's board.— That great men are coming to the front. 
—That O'Connor, Porter, Soltry, and another man, can run the Cap- 
ital.— That it reminds one of the smart things done by a man, a boy, a 
d— ni fool, and a Dutchman. That OConnor should be forwarded to the 
Centennial as an exhibition of cheapness. That he can run several en- 
gines and a dozen quartz mills with one nian.-^— That it would be a good 
thing for the State if the Legislature would adjourn sine rft'c— — That 
Lewis is the man from Connecticut who put green spectacles on his mule 
to make him eat shavings.— That Hendricks does not keep his appoint- 
ments to attend masquerades. —That Lewis, Farley, Johnson and Beck 
tasted Monopole at Judge English's dinner Thursday night.— —That 
McGuire is in love. ■ < That the object of his affections is auburn haired. 
—That Sallie H. was Chairman of the Committee on Education from 
the House. That she went to Berkeley. That McGuire went. 

Sacramento Lies. — It is not true that the lady in sacred mourning did 
the Arcade Friday night. That she was left at the door Saturday night. 
That her escort concluded he would dine at the club. That the "immacu- 
late" invited her to go to Folsom on Sunday. That it stormed, and they 
couldn't go. That her friends don't keep her secrets. ■ That Henry 
Lowell looks like a Turk. That he knows how to run a harem.— —That 
John Larkin says, "Gentlemen, we will try and pay you off next week." 
—That Ed. Murray is getting the best of the Colonel. That the Col. 
will find it and, like he does some other things, when it is too late. " — 
That the City Attorney does his hair up nights on tea lead. — That 242 
K street was a little off Saturday night. That Mrs. P. couldn't see it. 
That Mr. P. did. =— That the divine Buckley has " another life he longs 
to meet," despite his nine children. -^That "Walter Emory would make 
a good Postotfice Clerk. That Henry Lowell is a victim of blighted 
affections.— —That Cantrelldoes everything '* in the language of the clas- 
sics transcendently magnificenta."— That the Arcade boarders are out 
of nights. That the Arcade is the moral house of the town. That the 
landlady is very motherly. That she can see through a plastered parti- 
tion. That she did not alwavs see as well. ■ That the Leader is dead. 
—That F.— de— F. G. is busted.— That there is nothing further, 
Brother Garrett. It is not true that the Hawthorne will not play with 
any one but O'Neill. That O'Neill stood at the entrance of the dress- 
circle at Saturday's matinee to be looked at. *^— That nut oil is in great de- 
mand in Sacramento. That it is used for coloring fashionable ladies eyes. 
— That Bill Barnes is running the Club alone.— —That the landlord of 
the Grand dresses in sack cloth and a;his, and sits opposite his lady 
boarders to prevent them from eating. 1 hit he succeeds.— That Crane 
was a "little off" at Saturday's math e?.— That the average Sacra- 
mentan prefers cheap performances or p ayer meetings. 

Sah Jose Lies. — It is not true that tr. French has a soft thing nowa- 
days.— That Eastman, at Moorehead's, paints and put his hair up in 
papers.— ■—That Ben Caswell likes the married women.— ■= That young 
Dr. Breyfogle wants the money back again that he spent at the leap year 
party. ^— That J. N. Burk likes to play one pin pool.— — That Frank 
Pray, of Santa Cruz, was over here last week.— That it agrees with 
Charles Wilcox to be married. ^— That Singletary wants some one to 
propose to him this year. — That George Ashley did not have to foot the 
" Bill " at the leap year party.— 'That Dock Anderson wants a job lay- 
ing off sidewalks.-^— That Tom Brown could not walk straight with his 

hair parted in the middle the other night. That Gregory, of the F. U., 

is a near relative of Mrs. Pateman, Vho died in Chicago.— That Miss 
A. H — t likes to have her company leave before two a. m.— That 
Givens George carries a bay window with him.— That A. L. Boggs 
does not want to ask any one " what he can do for them."— That Miss 
Y — g just came from the city.— That Ed. Goodrich, Lendrum and Dib- 
ble like to go on a spree when they think it will not be found out.— 
That Frank Haight thinks his mustache is killing.— That Geo. Ashley 
resides at Hanchettville.^— That Charles Hensley is getting " Moody" 
in his deportment. -=-That Ike Loeb never calls to " See-see"'' at all ; it is 
some other man. That W. C. Kennedy always burns his cigarritos and 
chews.— That George Pomeroy has retired to settle down for life, dis- 
gusted with S. J. society.— That the Nnrmalites will not trade at Mor- 
ton's, because he always looks so cross of late at the loss of his widow. 



STATEMENT 

OF THE C03TB1TIOX AJTD AFFAIRS OF THE 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of San Francisco, 

In the State of California, on the 31st day of December, A. D. 
1875, and for the year ending on that day, as made to the Insurance Commis- 
sioner of the State of California, pursuant to the provisions of Sections 010 and (Jll 
of the Political Code, condensed as par blank furnished by the Commissioner. 
Capital, $300,000. 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in Cash $200,000 00 

Amount of Capital Stock paid up in stockholders' approved stock notes, 

authorized by Section 410, Political Code 100,000 00 

Assets. 

Real Estate owned by Company S 17,000 

Loans on Bond and Mortgage 59,713 90 

Cash market value of all Stocks and Bonds owned bv Company 53,100 00 

Amount of Loans secured by pledge of Bonds, Stocks and other market- 
able securities as collaterals 21,040 00 

Cash in Company's oificcs at San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose 2,543 42 

Cash in fifteen Banks and Savings Banks in Cal'a, Oregon and Colorado . . . 121,093 92 
Interest due and accrued on all Stocks and Loans. 
Interest due and accrued on Bonds and 5J 

Premiums in due course of collectk n 

Premiums in due course of collectiun in hands of Agents. 
Assessment levied Dscembsr 17, 1875, remaining unpaid 

Casks and wine in warehouse owned by the Company \Z, 

Office Furniture, Safes, Horses, Buggies, Harnesses, in San Francisco, San 

Jose, Stockton, Oakland, Virginia City, Nevada, and Portland, Oregon. 10,383 05 

Oregon State Stamps on hand 136 70 

Short-term and call loans, on indorsed notes and other good securities 30,898 46 

Stockholders' approved notes, authorized by Section G14 of Political Code. 100,000 00 



,305 11 

Interest due and accrued on Bonds and Mortgages 4,2(13 91 

"",022 78 
,081 23 
,040 00 
,031 26 



26,( 
22,( 

28,0 



Total Assets §511,053 74 



Liabilities. 

Losses adjusted and unpaid, Fire, in California §1,825 00 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense, Fire, in Oregon and Utah. . 2,750 00 

Losses in process of adjustment or in suspense, Marine, 1873 2,800 00 



Total Fire and Marine unpaid 

Gross premiums on Fire Risks running one year or less, 8307,905 6j , 

insurance fifty per cent 153.9S2 84 

Gross premiums on Fire Kisks running more than one year, §36,108 08, re- 
insurance pro rata 22,231 10 

Dividends to Stockholders not called for 1,106 00 

Total Liabilities 184,094 04 

Income. 

Net Cash actually received for Fire Premiums §367, 

Net Cash actually received for Marine Premiums 

Discontinued Marine business, January 20, 1875. " 
Received for interest on Bonds and Mortgages, Stocks, Loans and from all 

other sources 27 

Interest accrued on same 5. 

Assessment on capital stock, levied December 17, 1875 GO, 

Increase in value of United States Bonds 



7,375 00 



,285 70 

,003 82 



,226 48 
304 70 
,000 00 
,084 53 



Total Income $465,905 29 

Expenditures. 

Net amount paid for Fire Losses (including §9,324 11 losses of previous 

years) §268,480 36 

Net amount paid for Marine Losses (including §63,194 41 losses on previous 

years) .* 08,298 14 

Dividends to Stockholders .' 30,500 00 

Paid or allowed for Commissions or Brokerage 07,369 62 

Paid for Salaries, Fees, and all other charges for Officers, Clerks, etc 38,144 22 

Paid fur all other office expense 30,042 40 

Paid for State, National and Local Taxes 993 85 

Reinsurance and Cancellations of Marine Risks upon retiring from that 

branch of the insurance business 9,100 72 

Sundry small items to Profit and Loss 592 92 

Total Expenditures §520,122 23 

liosses. 

FIRE. MARIXE. 

Incurred during the year §263,731 25 §5,103 73 



Bisks and Premiums. 

FIRE RISKS. 

Net amount of risks written during the year §25,721,855 

Net amount of risks expired during the year 20,511,114 

Net amount in force December 31, 1875." 22,708,153 

Risks written in the State of California 23,923,344 



PBEJtlfMS. 

§378,019 25 
324,076 12 

344,07:1 76 
370,384 11 



MARINE RISKS. PHE.MUMS. 

Net amount of risks written during the year §315,229 § 5,169 20 

Net amount of risks expired during the year 801,825 28,076 55 

Risks written in the State of California.! 308,354 4,525 30 



Chas. R. Story, Secretary. 



J. F. HOUGHTON, President. 
Jan. 29. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL &TEAKSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yo- 
kohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

BELGIC February 16th and May 16th. 

GAELIC -. March lGth and June 16th. 

OCEANIC April 17th and July 17th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 3 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Jan. 22. 

J. H. CUTTER'S OLD B0UBB0N AND RYE WKISKY, 

Manufactured by Milton J. Hardy & Co., Sons-in-Law and 
Successors of J. H. CUTTER, Louisville, Ky. E. MARTIN & CO., 

August 14. No. 408 Front street. Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



Feb 5. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



LOCAL DOTTINQa 

The iuteraectloii I oondi- 

■ .1 \ 

' u R3 for plaintiff in 

M.ur\ S, Inn I . t a). II nrv 

in. lit in tht* Kiti.'.iitli l>i»trict I 



inted Clerk, "f thi District Court, 
— I Committee will Investigate th< 

k'tiniiiKo.uitructrtwiuitlwt.— ^Commwtort Robert Martin, n 
mida well known eiti/.n. died on \\ •■.in. isday an niiu,— — Dr. 

churvh will oniaJ tea part} on 

I tuiil 23d of February, in the Art Gallery of the Pavilion. — In 
\ the i»i,| Fellows' Library i volumes as follows; Eto 

151; biography, 17*»: 
2W; science, 180; theology, 27; belles lettrea, 224. T.-t-d.'s. i 1 . 1 :.. 

I work "f the letter carriers in January i-* mmmariied aa follows: 

delivered, 273,140; registered letters delivered, 1,002; dtj 
lelivervtl, S3,285; ] ■<■-t.il cards delivered, 107,279; | apers delivered, 
Dan McNeil and John Mogan bad a fight on Wednesday after- 
McNeil slapj and he retaliated by stabbii 
ith n penknife, inflicting a alight wound. Mogan was ai 
— — K. Kelly s soap factory, on Greenwich street, between Webster and 
Franklin, was destroyed t>\ Bre Wednesday night,— ^The Libera] 1 ■ a jm 
nfSan I atemplata erecting a bronze statue of Tom Paine hi 
ln.l. pendence Hall, rhilad.-lphia.—— Alfred Paraf, of oleomargarine 
tame, i- said to have taken a hurried trip to the " Springs."^— P. 11. Mc- 
Gowan, late proprietor of tin- San Mateo Time*, has purchased a quarter 
and will hereafter assist m its management. 
>~— The mineralogical cabinet of the State University is being arranged 
nnder the direction of Henry G. Banks. It contains the Hanks' Geolo i- 
irey and Pioche collection "f mineral specimens.*" — A match race 
for $10 - place Wednesday between Blade's br. g. iHrigo and 

in five, to harness. Qirigovrov 
md, fourth and Hftli heats, and the race; best time, 2i3£f.— — The 
North LAopard Gold and Silver Mining Company incorporated, to work in 
the Cornucopia Mining District, Elko county, Nevada; capital. $10,000, - 
pOO, Directors G io, Hearst, C. K. Greathouse, C. S. Drew.T. A. Brown. 
— Tin- Masonic Savings and Loan Hank institute suit, in the Nineteenth 
l i 'ourt against Martha Troll to foreclose a mortgage for $4,000— 
.I.'hn Seeley, a messenger in the office of H. W, Plummer & Co., stock- 
brokers, is reported to have left for " the springs, "takiny with him 81,500 
belonging to the Hrm named.—— K. A. Stevenson was knocked down ami 
robbed of a small sum of money by two men, on Post street, Tuesday 
night—— Maggie Reardon, aged fifteen, and Camillia Hintze, were yes- 
Unlay committed t" the Industrial School by the Police Judge.— —A 
tittle boy, s..n of John Douglass, was run over by a butcher cart on Pacific 
Iteeet, near Jones. He was not seriously injured.— The case of John 
Hopper against W. J. Hamilton, to recover $5,000 claimed to he due on 
account of stock and other transactions, is on trial in the Fourth District 
jUourt. ■ «■ "Victor Briant, last Monday night, had a little trouble with 
Joseph Zamite, and cut him across the cheek with a penknife.— -Next 
Saturday evening H. W. Luther and C. H. Edwards, a printer whose 
hand was recently hurt by being caught in a printing press, will receive a 
complimentary entertainment and ball at Charter Oak Hall, Market 
strict.— Allen P. Mayer, an iron moulder, forty-one years old, was com- 
mitted to the Insane Asylum yesterday. His wife and neighbors are in 
constant fear of hira.^— The Great Republic sailed for Yokohama and 
Hongkong to-day.— *«The sailing of the Ajax for Portland has been 
deferred until to-morrow. The schooner Frances has been sold on terms 

d, but supposed to be *1,500.— The Second Infantry, Colonel R. I 
H. Savage, had a drill in La Gnfnd Armory.— H. B. M. Corvette 
Amethyst is daily expected here to relieve one of the shim on the Pacific 
fetation.— The Fourth District Court has granted MaryT. Hill a divorce 
from Ashbel F. Hill, on the ground of desertion.— —Fourteen vessels 
cleared from this port with wheat last month, carrying 448,200 centals, of 
the value Mt 8888, 300. —The steamer Coquille, coming up the harbor, 
struck on Anita rock, but floated off all right yesterday morning.— -One 
of Hill's Yosemite paintings, on exhibition at the Art Association rooms, 
tas been sold to Leland Stanford for $10,000.— In the case of Eliza 
Thomas vs. Annie R. Read et ak, the Third District Court has granted a 
decree for the plaintiff as prayed for. 

FOREIGN DOTTINGS. 

Jolui Forster, formerly one of the editors of the Daily News, and 
latterly celebrated for bis " Life of Charles Dickens," is dead.— General 
Quesada has destroyed the powder and cartridge manufactory, and occu- 
pies Drina, Arteage and Ceavuri, in Biscay. He now threatens Durango. 
^— The Austrian, Russian and German Ambassadors have communi- 
cated orally on Count Andrassy's note to the Porte. These, and other 
Powers at the same time, declared that they saw nothing in it contrary to 
the Treaty of Paris.—— Holines, British Consul at Bosnia Serai, capital 
of Bosnia, has gone to Constantinople on a special mission.— Arch- 
bishop Ledochowski is expected to arrive in Rome on the 6th of February. 
The Archbishop will probably remain in Rome. -^—Advices from Slavonic 
sources report the Turks repulsed at Gradatz recently, losing 80 killed, j 
and that they met with a reverse near Klek, where they lost 50 men.— 
Cardinal Simoni has been instructed to quit Madrid if the Government ) 
assents to an approval by the Cortes of the clause of the proposed Con- i 
etitution relating to liberty br worship.— An official dispatch has been ' 
received in Washington stating that the report that Cuban insurgents had 
entered Cienfuegos is entirely untre.-^— A special from Berlin says Cardi- 
nal Hohenlohe has gone to Rome. It is thought that this tends to confirm 
the statements that negotiations are in progress for the establishment of a 
modus vivendi between the Church and the State in Germany.— A Ber- 
lin special states that the Penal Code amendment, relative to pamphlets 
and pastorals, was rejected by a maneuver of the Ultramontanes, who 
pressed a division when many of their opponents were absent. —" The 
Servian Skuptschina closed recently.— F. R. Plunkett, Assistant Secre- 
tary of the British Legation at Yedo, is appointed Secretary at Washing- 



I i< i Pom Burit< . the Brail known I 

.: 

Louis, ami thai I'. nil. in,. i,t will 

low i ( ! ■ not Ui accept id-' cu 

of the American International - 

the I. a-. | Theinvitatlonii di i llni don tin 

that the time fixed i u the Henlej Annual Amatoui \ 

-«— •Indications of ■ gpeedy eruption of Mount Vesuvius u 

n makln In Naples for the oarob 

nee the overthrow ■■!" the Rnnrhonn. ■ A special from Bori 
Hohenlohe has had a conference with Uitonelli, and it Is stated hi 

quested an audience with the Pope, \ po la) from LI bo 

thai the i Chamber of Peers lias voted the abolition of slavery in the Island 
"t" St Thomas. Gulf ..Minima.*— A dispatch from Perth says people by 

a of the remains of Dealt. Mem- 
bers of the Hungarian Diet watch the body.— The protests which have 
been filed against illegal acts in the Senatorial elections, in France, are 
more numerous and Important than at oral reported**— Advices from the 

1 '!- of G I Hope report thai the Zambesi Mission has succeeded in 

a Bteamer on Lake Nyanza. Seven hundred natives were employed 

the vessel past Murchison cataracts, The Oxford University 

authorities have resolved not to accept Max Midler's resignation, but to 
appoint a deputy and divide the salary equally between bun and Midler, 
who will prosecute his studies of Indian literature,— A London dispatch 
.says: Sir John Glover has return from Paria His proposition to buy the 
French fisheries rights in Newfoundland was declined. He stated that the 
French authoritnesrahow considerable resentment at the discussion of the 
subject by the English Press.^— The Empress Augusta of Germany has 
sent Mrs. Dorrien Smith a gold and jeweled bracelet, and two ladies of 
Penzance brooches,, in recognition of the kindness to the passengers and 

. crew of the German steamship 8ch Her, which was wrecked at the Stilly 
Islands last year. 

TELEGRAPHIC DOTTINGS. 
Vice-President Wilson's funeral est Massachusetts $5,322 23.— 
Mrs. Polly Jerome, New London's "oldest inhabitant," is US years old 
and has 98 descendants.— "Oh !" says Ben Butler, contemplating the 

amnesty tight ; *' Oh ! for just one hour in Congress !"— G. L. Fox, the 
actor, is still in the asylum at Somerville, Mass.— The first man to die a 
natural death in the lilaek Hills was a Mr. Hollcnbeck. His remains 
have arrived at Cheyenne.— —The last descendant of the famous navi- 
gator, Americo Vespucci, who gave his name to the New World, has just 
died near Florence.— Mr, Disraeli, on his 70th birthday, received a 
letter of congratulation from the Nottingham and District Workingmen's 
Constitutional Association.— The publication of Charles Sumner's 
works has come to a standstill, the fund left by him for completing the 
edition having been expended.— Miss Charlotte Cushman is again dan- 
gerously ill in Boston, and her condition gives serious alarm to her 
mends.— Colonel Baker, the British officer who is now in jail for inde- 
cent assault, is said to be immensely popular in Pans, and Miss Dickinson, 
his victim, is just the reverse. One of the most poDular songs of the day 
celebrates the virtues of the recreant Colonel.— The persons convicted 
of participation in the whisky frauds at Indianapolis have been placed in 
the State Prison.— The stern-wheel steamer John M. Chambers had her 
upper works burned on Wednesday evening, while lying at the levee in 
St. Louis. Damage about §10,000 ; insured in Cincinnati offices for 820,- 
000.— —A fire in Beekinan street, New York, yesterday, caused a loss of 
§65,000, of which 856,000 is suffered by Norman L. Munro, publisher of 
a widely-circulated story paper.— —An engine with a snow plow went 
through a bridge on the Midland Railroad near Middleton, New York, on 
Wednesday, carrying nine men with it, all of whom were seriously in- 
jured, one fatally.*— A committee of the creditors of Harris, Chipman 
& Co., of Boston, report the liabilities of the firm at 8320,365, and the 
assets at $158,850. The firm offers 37^ cents on the dollar on time.— — 
The United States Attorney for Kansas has been instructed to proceed at 
once against the parties accused of complicity in the Pottawatamie Indian 
frauds. These frauds relate to the collection of money and selling of 
lands by persons acting as bogus administrators of Indian estates. 
—An inquiry into the loss of the Harvest Queen was opened at Liver- 
pool on Tuesday. The amount of bullion withdrawn from the Bank of 
England on balance last Tuesday was £65,000.*— The reported elope- 
ment of the Earl of Dunraven with the daughter of a Montreal physician 
is without foundation.— The Indianians recently tried and convicted at 
Indianapolis for whiskey frauds were placed in the State Prison at Jeffer- 
sonville.— A London dispatch of February 2d states that the steamship 
Indiana from Philadelphia, the Prussian from Portland, and the Victoria 
from New York, have arrived out.— Sylvester Scott, the Cloverdale 
bear hunter, killed two brown bears last week, on Thomas Cooper's 
ranch, six miles above Cloverdale.— L. R. Newell, a hand in the boiler 
shop at Sacramento, committed suicide last Saturday morning by shoot- 
ing himself through the head with a pistol. —A man named Williams, 
formerly a saloon-keeper in San Diego, and concerned as a leader in the 
Chinese trouble at Los Angeles some years ago, was shot and killed by 
Charles Austin, at Ivanpau, recently.— Mr. Walker, of Los Angeles, 
who has started the industry of note, news and wrapping paper manufac- 
ture from the bayonet cactus, will have his pulp mills on the Mojave Des- 
ert, and his manufactury probably in Los Angeles.— —A raft from a 
wrecked vessel came ashore at San Luis Rey last Friday, though there are 
no means of telling from what vessel it came or who had been upon it. 
It was twenty feet square, and made of booms and spars firmly lashed to- 
gether, with a water-barrel lashed on one corner.— Considerable anxiety 
was felt in Sonoma County last week lest the cold snap had injured the 
fruit buds, which were far advanced, but it was found that they had sus- 
tained no injury, thanks to a heavy mist which hung over the valley.— 
Lewis Parsons, a rancher from Yolo County, 56 years old, went to Sacra- 
mento a few days ago to see his father and mother, aged respectively 96 and 
86 years. - Domingo Seezry, for 25 vears one of the characters of Santa 
Rosa, died in the County Hospital recently, at the age of 100 years. He 
was a Malay sailor and was wreck on the coast in 1851.— —The publica- 
tion of the Boston Daily News, the evening paper formerly owned by E. 
D. Winslow, suspended recently. It is reported 8200,000 have been sunk 
in the attempt to establish it.— The Republican Congressional Campaign 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRAKCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 5. 



CRA DLE. ALTAR. AND TOMB. 

CRADLE. 

Koch— In this city, January 37th, to the wife of Wm. D. Koch, a sod. 
Cahu— In this city, January 32d, to the wife of David Cahn, a daughter 
Miller— In this city, January 22d, to the wife of Capt. J. Miller, a daughter. 
Heppe— In this city, January 22d, to the wife of J. G. Heppe.a eon. 
Young 1 - In this city, January 31st, to the wife of R. H. Young, a son. 
Lindner— In this city, February 1st, to the wife of J. Lindner, a son. 
Manning 1 — In thiB city, January 81st, to the wife of H. J. Manning, a son. 
Harris— In this city, February 1st, to the wile of Daniel Harris, a daughter. 
VonGlahn-In Oakland, January 31st, to the wife of J. F. Von Glabn.a sou. 
Wig-more— In this city, January 31st, to the wife of John Wismore, a son. 

ALTAR. 
Bartels-Sublett— In this city, February 2d, C. F. Bartels to Nellie B Snblett. 
Sinclair-Millig-an— In this "city, January 31st, S. F. Sinclair to Ellen Milligan. 
Aitken -Hayes— In this city, John R. Ait ken to Annie L. Hayes. 
B lock- L.e Vinson— In this city, February 2d. Bernard Block to Clare Lcvinson. 
MayviUe-Alexander— In this city, Jan. 27th, F. Muyville to A. L. Alexander. 

TOMB. 
Gartland— In this city, Jannary 29th, James Gartland, aged, 33 yeara. 
Short - In this city, Janurry 20th, Magg'e Short, aged 11 years. 
McCarthy— In thin city, February 1st, Alfred McCarthy, aged 5 years. 
Hoff— In Oakland, January 31st, Caroline B. Hoff, aged 69 years. 
SorreU— In this city, February 1st, Mulvania E. Sorrel), aged 15 years. 
Noyes— In this city, February 2d, Annie F. C. Noyea, aged 2 months. 
McDonald— In this city, February 2d, John McDunald, aged 40 years. 
Bonn— In this city, February 2d, Marie M. Bohn, aged 11 years. 
Ahrens— In this city, February 1st, Annie Ahrens, aged lli months. 
O'Connor— In this city, February 1st, Timothy O'Cor.nor, aged 42 years. 

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for the 
Week ending February 2, 1876. 

Compiled from the Records of the Mercantile Agency of John McKillop tfc Co. t 
317 California Street, San Francisco. 



Thursday, January 27th. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



John Archibald to Mich'l Kelly . 
V S Moore to Jerome B Piper. . . 

BF Swan to C J Fiatt 

W JGunn toNLThomsen 

Thos Graham to Geo Graham... 

A VV Lenne to A Vahlbuscb 

A Vahlbusch to A W Lenne 

Jos S Alemany to H Rutledge ... 
A D Splivalo to S Martinovicb.. 

W E Young toGeo Goodrum ... 
D Green to Emil Grisar 



DESCRIPTION. 



F Cunnineham to Theo Le Roy. 
D W C Gaskill to Oliver McAvoy 

C C Clay to L S B Sawver 

Greek C & BenSoc to E Chielovich 

Buena Vista Hd Asn to A Dirking. 

Water Front L Co to same 

Erlw Preble to Jas B Haggin 

Martha B Hunt to AL'nes Clark 

Bay ViewH As'n to A Goldsmith. 
Annie G Goldsmith to G Wnbben . 

T L Com'rs to Cath K Brown 

ChftB Teckelnburg to G W Wells. . 

H Wend t to Geo Brown 

H F Crane to City and Co of S F. . 



Nw Howard, 525 sw 7th, 25x90 

Nw De Boom, 200 ne 2d, 25x80 

Sub 2 and 3, lot 15 of blk 313, Hunter T 

S Sutter, 110 e Lyons, 27:6x137:6 

S7thav, 280 w K, 80x100 

F Army, 25 e Sanchez, 25x114 

Ne Armv and Sanchez, 25x114 

S Pt Lohos av, 50 w Collins, 20x125 

Ne 3d, 75 nw Townsend, 50x80, subject 
to mortgage , 

E Fair Oaks, 97 n 23d, 25x117:6 

160 acs com at sw cor of the Sans Souci 
prop'ty, running n SO deg. 45 min. etc. 

Blk 81, W A-Larkin, Bay, Polk, N P't. 

E Larkin, 117:6 s Jackson. 20x82:6 

Sw IStli and Sherman, 75x125 

|Sw Parker av and Turk, s SO deg 45miu, 

I w 407. 8 9 deg, etc 

iLotl, blk 108, Buena Vista H'd 

ISe 5tli av and J, 15x100 

[Sundry properties in Western Addition. 

W Va'eucia, 176:6 n 20th, 25x100 

Lot5, blk 533, Bay View H'd 

Same 

Nw Howard, 100 sw 7th, 25xll 5 

S Powell av, 200 e MisBinn, 25x100 

N Post, 35 w Larkin. n 95, e 55, etc 

N Bay, 38:5 w Jonas, w 99:1, n 119, etc . 



PRICE 



$1,600 

1,225 

5 

925 

1,000 

5 

5 

700 

15,000 
1,000 

600 
5,500 



500 

750 

5 

250 

500 

150 

16 

500 

5,000 

1,955 



Friday, January 28th. 



Wm Barry to Masonic S & Ln Bk 
Same to same 



Francis C Cleary to Honora Cleary 
Market & 14th St H A to W Alvord 



E Webster, 50 s O'Farrell, 25x90 

Lot 122. blk 122, Central Park Hd; also, 

n 24th, 75 e Bryant, e 25x104 

Lot 161 and portion 162. block 181, San 

Francisco Hd Union 

E Belcher, 100 u 14th, n 125x125 



Same to Nat Gold Bk and Trust Co £ Sanchez, 150 n 14th, n 25x125 . 



Jas D Walker to Fredk A Hill 

Same to Thos Kavanagh 

M Williamson to A G Fitzpatrick 
Richd L Ogden to Wm Searon ... 



CCameto to Jean Dnpny 
H McLaughlin to R Lavilla 



E Van Ness, 67:6 n Erldv, 25x109 

E Van Ness, 30 n Eddy, n 37:6x109 

Alabama w, 286 s 201 h, s 26x100 

Cor 4th and Bryant, 275x275— also se of 
Perry, 230 sw of 4th, sw 45x80 

N Broadway, 115 eof Stockton. 22:6x130 

Nt- Pacific and Larkin, 45:10x60 

NoeGar ftdU'n to J B Gallagher. [E Douglas, 210 n 22d. n 50x134:8 

J Decker et al to Albert Cramer. . ISW Clinton, 75 nw Brannau, 25x80 

Mar & 14th St Hd to J McFarlandlW Landers, 210 n 14th, n 25x125 

Jas Morrison to Ellen Mc Avery Undivided l-6thu Union, 44:6 w of San- 
some, 25x120 

MHHurlhert etal to A Belaeco. . N Cleary, 92:6 a 5th, e 45x80 

J no Archbald to Anton Lemaire...|N\v Natbma, 425 sw of7tb, sw 50x75 



$ 876 

1,874 

Gift 
6,355 
1,270 
5,250 
7,875 
700 



6,000 
3,500 
500 
1,568 
1,285 

108 
6.000 
3,175 



Saturday, Jannary 29th. 



Susanna Scholl to Wm Sharp 

Cath Crane to Mary Bray 

Wm Saalburg to Alrich Bnrmeittterj 
Simon Popper to Hannah Lucette' 
John Landers to Adam Grant.... 1 
Mar & 14th St Hd Ass'n to A Mi Her 
Ira Wentworth to Benj Hoharl Jr. 



E Goslinsky to Jos Napthaly 

Same J;o Adolph Roos '. 

Wm Sharon to WmS O'Brien..... 

A Holms to Jane Kerrigan 

A J Ralston to Jno Kentfl'-ld 

H Brown to Richard Dowdale.... 

Willows Land Ass'n to same 

Thomas Neil toLawrence McNally 



N Post, 111:6 e Dnpont, e 26x73 

E Mission, ISO s 25th, s 30x115 

Ne of Eddv and Steiner, e82:6x82:7... 

Lot 21, block 640, Pt Lobos AveHd... 

S Pine, 181:8 e Hyde, e 10 inches x 137:6 

Belcher w, 150 n 14th, n 50x125 

Undivided two-thirds s Fell, 137:6 w of 
Franklin, w 137:6x> 20— subj to mortj 
for $14,000 

Neol Post and Gough, n 120x30 

Not' Post, 30eGmiL'h, e 30x120 

S Sutter, 137 6 w of Powell, \> 200x137:6 

Lot 7, blk 11, Fairmount Tract... ... 

Sw Fremont, 95:6 nw Harrison, 42x92 

E Valencia, 135 s 18th, s 75x80 

Same 

Sundry properties in western portion | 
city | 1,475 



27,000 
2,000 
325 
150 
2,540 
22,000 



6,000 
6,000 

202000 

500 

5,500 

5,500 

5 

6.200 



Monday, January 3lst. 



GRANTOR AND GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Tide Land Comrs to Jas II Lemon Sw Harriet, 150 se Howard, se 25x75 

Drury Melonj to D Bush etal.... jSe Scott nnd Eddy, s 137:6x137:6 

Philip H Graser to John Costello. [Lots 1,672 and 1.703, Gift Map 3 

Thos Magce tu Wm Curlett |E Pierce, 100 n Tyler, 37:6x1(15 

CM Richmond to Alex Warnei JriE Capp,205 n 18lb, 25x122:6 

Jas Adams to Henry Kelly !N Sac, 55 e Broderick, 100x27:6 

A B South worth to City & Co S FlStreets and Highways 

M Fraser to Thomas Dixon F Lily, 30 w Laguna, 25x40 

Ellen Galvin to Jno Riely . ..... Nw Bryant, 115 ne 4th, ne 40x80 

EC Skinner to John C Parks N 26th, e of Guerrero, 27x31 

JnoFSinton to Joe Skae S Clary, 197:6 e 4th, 27:6x80 

Same to same . . . : iE 4th, 50 n Clary, 25x80 



Same to same 
Same to same 
Same to same 
Same to same 
Same to same 
Same to same 



N Clary, 160 e of 4th, e 60x75 

N Clary, 120 e of 4th, c 40x75 

F Clary 220 e of 4th, e 27x76 

N Clary, 80 e 4th, 40x75 

Ne 4th and Clary, 50x80 

Se4th and Clary, 25x80. 

Same to same N Clarv, 247 e of 4tli, e 23x75 

Same to same (Ne of Harrison and 5th, n 75x30. 

Charles Murry to Samuel MathewsiE Dolores, 94 n 22d, 28x92:6 

James Cndworth to I M WentwortbJSw of Laguna and Filbert, 32:6x87:6 

Benj Hoban JrtoMfl Laidley.,..|Und two-thuds s Fell, 187:6 w Franklin 

I w 137:0x120. sub to morta for $14,000. | 22,000 

FM Bokmann to A Arrechea IS Clay, 43:9 eof Dupont, 25x68:9 ... 

Eugene Marrinane to D J OliverlNe 8ih, 195 se Howard.se 25x137:6 



11,000 

350 

2,600 

10 

1,000 

1 

700 

6,750 

900 

25 

25 

40 

25 



50 
80 
20 
50 
900 
1,250 



. I 11.000 
. I 4,500 



Tuesday, February 1st. 



J C Duncan to William RommeljLot 22, blk 38, City Ld Association 

Jno Archbald to Peter Enright ... (Se Nitoma, 350 BW of 7th, 25x75 

Same to John J Smith ISe Natoma. 375 sw of 7th, 25x75 

Harrsnn Roberts to Mrs Ann ReedS 15th av, 225 w P, 25x92:6. O N & HT't 
Mary A Tibhey to Henry S Tibhey|S Green, 45:9 e Montgomery ave, elc... . 
DF McDonald toGuadalupaCarlosiUud one and a half ac McDonald Truct 

E Burr to Benj X Brown ISe Tehama, 135 sw 3d, 80x80; also nw of 

| Minna. 97:6 ne of 3d, 20x80 

H F Hoffman to Mary L Hoffman jSundrysnhdivs of Smoke Ranch 

A H Vaughn to Elizabeth Vaughn'Sw 6th, 75 se Folsom. 50x60 

M Doyle to James McCormack IN Bonita, 131:6 w Polk, w 25, n, etc.... 

Mar & 14tli St Hd An to G Jaudin I Landers w, 185 s 14th, s 25x125 

GeoJaudin to Mary E Jaudin Same 

II Michaels to Louisa Michaels iVan Ness w,94 n Oak, 26x82:9 

Wm Hollis to Samuel Rowcll 'Jessie, 107 s 20th, 22x75 

Wm Sharon to John Skae IS Fulton, 137:6 e Polk, e 68:9x137:6 .... 

Paul Rousset to F M Orjnbin.. ,JSw MoutL'omerv Av, 40:20 nw Powcl) etc 

JasPhelan to Jno Wieland Jr.... |N Turk, 245 w Franklin, 30x120 

Odd Fellows' Cem Asn to C Lester! Lot 3, Hope Sec plot 3, O F Cem 

Mar & 14th St Hd to Chas LeGay'E Landers, 210 s 14tli, s 100x125 

Jos C Cardozo to Robert Murdoch | Western Addition block 576 

James Murphy to Theresa B Curry |N Page, 110 Buchanan, 110x150 

FI Curry to Jas Murphy. (Same 

HMGoeltingtoD & PGardimeier'.S Filbert, S7:6 w Powell, 19x70 



$ 90 

1,550 

1,550 

70C 

1* 

5 

Gilt 

Gift 

750 

1,275 

5 

Gift 

3,385 

10.000 

7,010 

4,8:0 

00 

5.0SO 

700 

Gift 

2,000 

3 750 



Wednesday, February 2d. 



Edward Vischer to A J Pope I 

Benj Richardson to Bame | 

Flint Tract Hd Ass'n to II B Chase 1 
City and Co S F to A B Sontliworthj 
A J Morrell to James Cosgrove. ... 
A J Gunnison to Kate A Pidwe!) 
Michael Hogan to Mary Daly 

J D Casebolt to Charles J Fox 

Woodbury Bradford to M Reubold; 
Wm Hattaboush to J Armstrong' 
Tide Land Comrs to J McNamara 
C T Pidwell to A J Gunnison... 1 

MDorctoJae Flood I 

John Center to Ruddy Doyle... 
I T Milliken to Denis Sullivan... 
A Klopeiistine to Fred Funcke... 
Nat Gd Bk & Trust Co to A J Pope 
Marg't Doyle to Mich'l Doyle 



I Olive J Clark to John Grady 

Abraham Levy to Pat k F Nolan ., 



John Mahon to John Martell 

A W Bowman to Amanda Arnot .. 

John 4rchbald to T C Jansen 

Benj F Sterett to F Henry 

G Goodman to Rich'd Tobin 

Rich'd Tohin to Francis 11 Drnffel. 

Fmnk Caffry to Thos Donnelly 

Same to same 

John O'Brien to P N Hanna 

Market St H'd As'n to H Baroilhet 
Jas Walsh to Solomon Peneton . . . 

Henry Hinkel to Cesar Dor 

Market St It As to F Hufschmidt.. 
E Chielovich to Greek Church 



S cor Harrison and 8th, sc 175*275.... 

Sundry properties throughout city 

Lot 7, blk 4, Fiint Tract Hd 

Sundry properties thouL'hont city 

N North Pt at. 137,6 e Broderick 08x137 

N 14th, 240:4 e Mission, 52x110 

NO'Farrell, 82:0 e Webster. 55x137:0; 

ulso, s O'Farrell, 90 w Bucha'n, 90x25 

E Laguna, 100:8 s Greenwich, s, etc 

N Winters Lane, 20 e of Mason, 25:9x22 

Se Cheneiy, 5 ne Miguel, ne 50x100 

Nw Shipley, 100 ne of 6th, lie 25x75.... 

N 14th, 145:7 e Mission, 51:9x110 

Ne Dore, 290 se of Bryant, 25x83 

E M ission, 30 n 19th. n 30. e 122:6, 6 etc 

S25lh, 252:3 e Church, e 25x114 

Sw 24th and Fair Oaks, 125x100 

Front w, 91:8 s Jackson, 45:10x137:0 

N Bonita, 134:6 w Polk, w 25, n 77:11!;, 

ne29:3}£, etc 

S Bush, 200:3 w Octavia, 31:6x137:6 

N Tyler, 139:0 w Steiner, 37:6x137:6. sub 

to mortgage for £1.875 

E Zoe, 97:0 s Bryant. 20x75 

N Pine, 137:0 e Van Ness, 63x137:6 

Se Natoma, 500 sw 7fh, 25x75 

Nw Howard, 200 sw 1st, 25x85 

Sw Clayand Hyde, 60x80 

Same 

NEIiz'lh, 229 e Grove. 51x114 

Lot 12. blk 25, Fairmount Tract 

Lot 16, blk 532, Bav View H'd 

W Belcher, 100 n 14th, 50x025 

N G:over, 229:0 w Jones, 23x60 

S McAllister. 114:6 w Webster, 25x137:6. 

N 14th, 114:6 w Websler, 23x137:6 

S Turk, 407 w Parker ave, w 40:4, s 41 

deg, w 201:6, etc 



203000 

1 

1,100 

1 

1,500 

2,000 

1,600 

200 

7 

t 

800 

10 

400 

5.500 

19,000 

650 
3,400 

4,500 

2,750 

lO'OOO 

1.5M 

6.500 

104 

1 

1,000 

900 

300 

2.510 

2.000 

2,668 

1,290 

3,043 



Thursday, February 3d. 



Isaac Joseph to Harris Joseph 

Harris Joseph to Louis Joseph ... 

Harrison Barto to J Aitchison 

Win Ho'.lis to M McDonald 

L S Welton to August Ilahn 

John Berry to Henrv Hughes 

John Reilly to Mary Reilly 

Pt Lobos H'd As'n to C B Turrell. 

Wm Hollis to Jacob Schwerdt 

Same to Wm Deacon 

G Wolfes to Louis Lang 

A J Plate to C Spreckejs 

Albert Boltzto Mary Bollz 

Market St H'd Ass'n to A Borel.. 
W A Macondray to M Gallagher .. 

L Seligman to Win Schleicher 

A Sclieman to same 

JohnLHunttoEJLe Briton . . . 
C Daly to H S and L Soc'y , 



N Bush, 110 e Laguna, 27:6x127:6 

N Bush, 82:6 e Laguna, 27:0x137:6 

N Army, 50 e Sanchez, 30x114 

E York, 169 s 21th, 23x100 

S Bush, 137:6 w Buchanan, 08:9x137:6 .. 

Se Welch, 190 ne 4th, 20x80 

|E Rondel pi. 203:8 s 10th, 22:6x61:2 

[Lot 27, blk 041, Pt Lobos H'd 

W Jessie. 173 s 20lh, 22x75 

Se20th and Jessie, 37:0x85 

S Fell, 192:6 e Octavia, 27:6x120 

Polrcro Nnevoblks 1 1 and 16 

W Deviso, 58:9 n Ellis, 81:4 !*;xl25 

[S 14th, 50 w Landers, 25x110 

ISe Brvant. 60 ne 8th , 25x00 

|N Green, 133:8 w Montg'yav, 27:6x137:6 
: Same 

IW Alemany, 126 n 17th, 26x74:10 

[Sw Sausome and Greenwich, 137:6x68:9 



S.3,000 

3. 0C0 

420 

2,700 

500 

2,800 

5 

1 

3,000 

7,3i'0 

4,800 

8.000 

Gift 

1,665 

1,800 

5,600 

1 

775 

0,220 



The Special and Authorized Organ of the ^rial Stoam Navigation Co. --Fred. Marriott. Patentee 

ESTABLISHED JULY 20, KM. 



Prlo* per Copy. 15 Cants.) 



Annual Subiorlntlun in gold , 0.60. 



^» . . o i- ^^V. ^-* 




DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 26. 



SAN FKANOISOO, SATURD/Y, FEB. 12, 1876. 



No. 3. 



Ollir<-« «!' trtr Sun Fritnt-Hro BfoWSJ Letter, i ;ili l ornin < liiua 
.Mi%il. rnliroruii. .Hull Unx* Son— dde tforchanl street, No. (*>7 
9*0 Fnuiciseu. 

(1 OLD BARS 890(9900 SilvirBarh 8@12#cent disc. Treasury 
* Notes are wlhi Mexican Dollars, 6@7 l> cent. disc. 

Trade Dollars, 34<§ i\ per cent discount. 

_T Exchange on New York, J®— per cent for Gold: Currency, 12} 
per cent prem. On London, Bankers, 49@40£; Commercial. 40j 
Ifj Paris, B francs per dollar. Telegrams, 1 per cent. 

0- Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb. 11. at 3 p.m., 113. Latest 
price of Sterling, £4 86@*4 89fc 

*»* Trice of Money here, V<> 1 \ per cent, per month — bank rate. In the 
open market, l(S 1 '.. Demand active. 

FINANCE. 
The monetary aspect is cheerful. Add to our large supply of coin 
the release of three-quarters to one million for mortgage taxes heretofore 
np f the payment of dividends by hunks, mines, etc., and we may 
safely say we have abundance ; hence capital looks for investments, and 
loans are easily effected at moderate rates. The Clearing House will 
probably be in operation by the 1st of March. A few banks have as yet 
not joined Ws give them three months to change their mind. By that 
time they will have seen the great usefulness of the institution, and unless 
1 by motives which do not lie at the Burface, will quietly fall into 
the ranks. * The silver question is at present the topic of the day. Very 
erode ideas have been expressed. The crudest is that the heavy fall is 
brought about by speculation. The whole matter lies in a nutshell. Itis 
merely a question of supply and demand. Germany, having adopted a 
gold standard, threw three hundred millions of silver on the' market. The 
enormous production of our Nevada mines only helped to fan the fire. 
This production, large as it is, has been magnified, and Loudon, the center 
of the monetary world, took alarm. The principal outlet London has for 
silver is India and China. It happens that the halance of trade of both 
countries is at this time less in their favor than for years past, conse- 
quently remittances to India and China, which are always silver, arc slack, 
therefore silver accumulated in London, and hence the sudden and heavy 
decline. The overstocked silver market can be relieved for a time by the 
action of our Government in redeeming their 44 millions ot fractional cur- 
rency for silver. To say, however, that this will give permanent relief, 
would be a fallacy. If our mines in Nevada will continue to yield at 
the same rate they do now, we will have to solve the same problem two 
years hence. 

S^n Franciscoites Abroad. — Paris, Jan. 15, 1870 : Charles Aveman, 
Mr. and Mrs. Bixler, Mrs. F. A. Hassey, F. R. Hassey, Mr. and Mrs. 
T. B. Howard, "W. H. Locke, Mrs. Atkins Massey, Miss Maggie V. Has- 
sey. Mrs. Hall McAllister, Mrs. Kate Moore. Mrs. Fanny Osbourne,Miss 
Belle Osbourne, Mr. and Mrs. Emile Ulrich, R. B. Woodward, Misses 
Woodward (2). Rome, Jan. 15, 1870: Charles Harris. Mr. Freeborn, 
Miss W. N, Smith, Mr. and Mrs. B. P. Rankin. London, Jan. 15, 
I871; : Mrs. Longly, Miss Longly, S. Massett. Nice. Jan. 15, 1870 : Mr- 
and Mrs. W. H. Howard. Geneva, Jan. 12, 1870 : C. R. Bird, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. S. Delavan, Mrs. J. M. Strowbridge and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Turner. Naples, Jan. 10, 1870 : Mrs. R. H. Brown, Miss F. C. Gray, 
Mr. and Mrs. David Hewes. — American Register. 



Californiaris Registered at the Office of Charles Le Gay, Ameri- 
can Commission Merchant, 1 Rue Scribe, Paris, Jan. 14, 1870 : R. L. 
Woodward. Miss S. B. Woodward, Miss M. C. Woodward, R. B. Wood- 
ward Jr., Fdk. G. Merchant andfamilv, Edmund Brenil, Jas. Eldredge 
D. E. Hungerford and wife, Miss Ada Hungerford, C. F. Fargo, W. 
Kelvin Smith, Mrs. Hall McAllister, Misses McAllister, Chas. Warren 
Stoddard, H. R. Bloomer, Mrs. J. Preston Moore, Titus F. Cronise, Jo- 
seph Gordon. Miss Bella Thomas, Mrs. Ely and family, Auguste Kamdler, 
Thos. P. Howard and wife, W. H. Locke", David Bixler and wife, Mrs. 
Jeremiah Clarke and family, D. E. Easterbrook and wife, Col. Jules 
Briton and family, Mrs. I. J. Hickey, J. Harden Hickey, John B. 
LeGay. 

There are 1,500 Brokers in London, who pay a license fee of £2o, 
so that this source of income is one of great importance to the city. 



Mr. r. Algnr. BfO. 8 Clement* Lnne, Lomlon. is nnthorJzerf to 

receive subscriptions, sdvertiaoniants, communications, etc.. for this paper, 



Published with (his week's issue an Eiyht- 
Page Postscript. 



LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS WITH NOTES. 



The Retirement of George F. Hooper. — No repose is more sweet 
than that earned by toil, and at the same time no repose is more urgently 
necessary than that required by mental exertion. Mr. * M-m-gc V. Honj er 
may he considered the rounder of the First National Cold Bank of San 
Francisco, and as such to be the father of all the banks of like nature that 
have sprung up throughout the State. As President for many years, his 
labor, both of body and brain, has been entirely devoted to the affairs of 
the bank. That institution stood unmoved during the financial storm 
that shook and wrecked so many others the past year, and now Mr. 
Hooper retires to his beautiful estate at Sonoma, to gain health and 
strength, to breathe the pure country air under his own vine, or in the 
shade of his Bower-covered porch. He has well earned his repose, and 
our good wishes go with him. 

"A Poor Commercial JournaL" — This is the heading of an editorial 
in the Hecortlrtfhion respecting the San Francisco Journal of Commerce. 
We think the title well chosen, judging from its issue of this week, quot- 
ing quicksilver at 70c. and 75c. — ten cents above the market, and the fol- 
lowing remarks on sugar, which are simply absurd and untruthful: "The 
stock on hand is small at present, but there is a heavy stock on the way, 
due within forty days — one of upwards of 20,000,000 lbs., equal to four 
months' consumption. The Island Sugar for the California Refinery will 
be delivered in this city in about four months, at the rate of 4,500,000 to 
5,000,000 lbs. per month. The market will thus be well supplied for the 
next four months." ______ 

Newspaper Beats.— Two individuals who make a trade apparently 
of preying upon the gullibility of the public, are understood to be going 
about and obtaining money and other consideration on the strength of their 
assumed connection with this paper. Their names are Theodore Gidley 
and John Gilman. These parties had a temporary connection with this 
paper during last fall, but since that time have had no relation with the 
Nvivs Letter whatever. As they seem not to be the only persons thus im- 
posing on the public, we will be obliged to anyone who will report to us 
cases of this kind. We think we can apply an effectual remedy. 

Tbe President is serene and silent, still, as to third-term, but says he 
has written no letter withdrawing. He apparently means to go through 
the campaign on his present platform, neither openly seeking nor openly 
refusing renomination, at liberty to take it if it comes, free to say that he 
never sought it and don't want it, if it doesn't. In short, he has gone into 
camp, put up entrenchments, and proposes to stand siege. What a bother 
to the politicians these military men are ! — Springfield Republican. 

Beerbohm's Telegram. — London and Liverpool, Feb, 11, 1870. — 
Floating Cargoes, strong; Cargoes on Passage, firm; Mark Lane, do; 
No. 2 Spring off Coast, 43s. (a 43s. 6d.; do, for shipment, 41s. 6U(ffi42s.; 
California off Coast, 50s. Gd.@51s.; English Country Markets, dearer; 
French do, firm; Liverpool, moderate demand; California Club, 
10s. 8d,@llsld.; do Average, 10s. 3d@10s. 8d.; Red Western Spring, 
8s. Hd.@9s. 9d.; weather in England, hard frost. 

A bint at the reason why so many large concerns fail, with assets so 
small in comparison with their indebtedness, is afforded by these expenses 
which were reported at a recent meeting of the creditors of one of the 
largest dry goods jobbing houses in Boston : Rents, $17,000 ; salaries of 
salesmen, book-keepers, etc., S44.000 ; traveling expenses, §15,000 ; a total 
of §70,000, or about 10 per cent, of the gross amount of sales. 

Incorporation. — The following-named company filed its articles of in- 
corporation in the County Clerk's office yesterday: The Twin Peaks 
Mining Company; object — to mine for silver and other metals in Gold 
Hill Mining District, Storev County, Nevada. Directors— John A. 
Chandler, T. W. Colburn, B. B. Stansbury, Geo. A. Hill, and B. V. 
Barry. Capital stock, $10,000,000. 

Wext week our Itinerant Liar will visit Chico,. Oroville, Bed Bluff and 
Tehama. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, San Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 12, 1876. 



THE LATEST PROM INDIA! 

Our Special Correspondent with the Prince of Wales. 
It is with much satisfaction we lay. before our readers the following 

initial letter from our special correspondent with the Prince of Y\ 
India. It is simply another trifling evidence of the brilliant enterprise 
and regardless outlay on the part of the News Letter, before which such 
lesser luminaries am the London Times and the New York Herald pale 
their ineffectual fires. — Ed. 

Damphoore, India, February 22, 1876. 

Editor News Letter :— I little expected when, two weeks ago, you 
yelled to me out of a street car window (in emulation of the distinguished 
proprietor of the New York Herald in regard to the Stanley expedition), 
that there was a dead-head pass and a package of meal tickets at the 
overland station for me, and that I was to proceed at once to join the 
party oft His Koyal Highness in India, that I should be able to cable you 
the following so soon. This is particularly remarkable, as I was detained 
in New York a considerable time while some of Barnum's people trained 
an elephant for my especial use. This thing of using livery elephants 
when traveling, and continually being obliged to put up with some spav- 
ined old fraud, not up to your weight, is not the thing at all. As you 
may suppose, the Prince and his party were very much astonished to see 
me indeed. The former said he hadn't the remotest idea of my coming. 
So his delight must have been exceedingly great. The cute notion above of 
dating my dispatches a month or so ahead of time is a little wrinkle of 
my own invention, that will worry the other correspondents with the ex- 
pedition to death when they find it out. We are having a glorious time. 
An ovation every night — not a moment to ourselves. Yesterday we re- 
ceived the native princes of the Nipcheesit District. They seemed very 
much flattered by the way they were treated. I was particularly conde- 
scending to the Highawag of Muckadoo, the principal potentate. He 
gave me four diamonds as large as apples (crab), which I use as paper 
weights. He also gave me a bird of paradise and his eldest daughter. 
The latter was about the " deadest giveaway" you ever saw. I traded her 
to the Duke of Sutherland for a tobacco pouch, and he swapped her for a 
camel. I think she is to be raffled for this evening. We gave our guests 
a railroad prize package and a reversible flatiron apiece. 

Game is very plenty in this vicinity. The cariboo are especially fat, but 
at this season of the year they fly very high. The boomarangs are numer- 
ous, but to my mind are a little strong and fishy. There is nothing like 
living at the Maison Doree and the PalaceHotel to spoil one for the simple 
dishes of the camp. Wales I find to be a very good fellow, and I think he 
is really grateful for the quiet but unassuming mannerinwhich I show my 
consideration for him. The other day, for instance, I came across two 
superb tigers while out hunting. I immediately climbed a tree, so as not 
to lose sight of tliem until the Prince came up. I wanted him to have the 
first shot. The result is that my shins are raw yet. I am continually 
doing some graceful little thing of this kind for the heir- apparent, and I 
thiuk he fully appreciates them. In fact, I look for a letter of thanks 
from his wife by every mail. The Princess, by the way, is a charming 
woman. The least tiny little bit of a flirt — between you and I, in strict 
confidence — but what of that ? Girls will be girls. Wales asked me yes- 
terday in an off-hand sort of a way if I had "heard from any of his 
folks" recently ? He seemed a little worried, so I told him squarely and 
frankly that he need have no anxiety on my account as regards the* Prin- 
cess. Fun's fun, Mr. Editor, but this flirting with the wife of a man 
whose salt you have tasted, is too much for me. It isn't the square thing, 
besides I've sworn off. The United States will never be involved in a war 
with Great Britain through mp indiscretion. You can say so to Mr. Fish. 
I dine with the Ghumcheu of Pagoda on Thursday. I shall take the 
Prince with me. I make a point of taking him everywhere I go. This 
has kicked up a fearful breeze in court circles here, especially among some 
old friends I knew in the States, all of whom do not care to meet the 
Prince. I cannot help this, however. I try to be amiable and civil with 
everybody but I will not go back on a friend. We all have our little faults, 
and as long as Wales is sober and honest I mean to stand by him. In 
my opinion the Prince only needs good advice and a firm hand to do very 
well. The great objection, after all, is his forgetfulness. He is continually 
violating the ordinance against hitching your elephant to the tree boxes, 
and the result is, we are continually clubbing together to pay his fines. I 
never make such stupid mistakes. There is always a good hitching post in 
front of all the saloons here. The Prince has strained his eyes somewhat 
lately reading the News Letter by the the light of the camp-fire. Since you 
started your portrait supplement he has been hinting a great deal about 
sending you his photograph. Of course, I affect not to see what he is driv- 
ing at. I hate to be forced to snub anybody. Princess of Kattghut gave 
us a magnificent reception and kettledrum yesterday. As I advanced, 
leaning on the arm of Al, the Princess, who is really wonderfully beauti- 
ful, approached with great emotion. Sinking on one knee she seized my 
hand and said, in the sweetest voice imaginable, " Illustrious Prince, 
a thousand tongues have told me of thy manly perfections, but the real- 
ity exceeds the picture as the brightness of thine eyes exceeds the efful- 
gence of the morning star." She then gave me her picture. It was in In- 
dia ink. In the most considerate manner I broke the truth to her. After 
a struggle to conceal her disappointment she burst into tears and fainted. 
Wales was horribly mortified; the whole thing was extremely awkward. It 
took ma all the afternoon to cheer him up. This reminds me that I wish 
you would remit me four dollars more by the next steamer, as ever since the 
above incident Al has been sulking about my owing him that amountsince 
our last poker game, three weeks ago. He keeps referring to his large 
family, and the inadequacy of his allowance, and all that, in a very annoy- 
ing manner. This is very like a Wales. Speaking of the ladies reminds 
me of a queer incident that occurred the other day. It seems that Rus- 
sell, the Times correspondent — a most conceited dog, between us two — 
went to a reptilian cotillion over at the Nautch girls' the other night 
(the Nautch 's, by the way, of whom you read so much, are the very first 
people out here), and when coming home very late across lots, dropped his 
party teeth in the dark. Early in the morning he went out to look for 
them, and while groping round under a tree, suddenly felt his head sucked 
into the mouth of a huge boa-constrictor be had disturbed. As luck would 
have it I happened that way the next morning, it being my regular habit 
to stroll out and shoot a couple of chetahs before breakfast. When I ar- 
rived on the scene the anaconda had swallowed Russell all but his feet, 
and there he stuck. You remember Russell's feet ? No anaconda that 



ever breathed could have swallowed those feet without a pile-driver to 
help him. Russell knew whejy^ he had the snake, and I could hear him I 
whistling " When the swallows homeward fly" inside. Of course I res- | 
cued the unfortunate man before digestion set in. 1 just tied an Ameri- 
can flag U> the constrictor's tail, stood it up on end, and Russell's brogans 
walked it right into camp. I am sorry I did this now, The Prince is es- 
pecially furious that I should have saved Russell's life. Wales is down on 
him becaufe he says Russell always leaves him out of his dispatches. The 
trouble is that I have gotten so used to saving two or three lives a day 
that I do it often thoughtlessly. However, I have promised solemnly 
that the next occasion on which the Times man tries to tunnel an ana- 
conda, the latter is to have three days time allowance. The Prince made 
me take oath to this before the Koyal Coroner, who accompanies the 
hunting paties, and who also sits on all the gorillas by special request of 
Mr. Darwin. I mean when they are dead, of course. We hail a glorious 
hunt last Monday. I bagged nine tigers, four elephants, a buffalo and 
fifteen or twenty shilteries. The others got a tiger and six or eight rab- 
bits, or some such matter, apiece. I would send you a string of tigers, 
but they would not keep this weather. The evenings, in camp, are rather 
long, but I kill time by beading moccasins, playing Pedro and teaching 
Sutherland not to drop his H's. He doesn't get on very fast, though. I 
must stop now, as we are all going to a snake dance at Djhim-jhams. We 
are expected to bring our o»vn snakes. This is much the best plan, by the 
way, as this dancing with Tom, Dick and Harry's snakes, that you know 
nothing of, and meet in these promiscuous assemblages, i* the worst pos- 
sible form, I think. I will send you the particulars in my next. Don't 
forget the four dollars, and send me my other shirt, if yours is washed. 

D. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporated in Geneva, Switzerland, January 24th, 1S73. 
Head Office, in Geneva. Capital, #2, 00 0,000. subscribed. $1,000,000 paid 
up. President, HKNKY HENTSCH. San Francisco Branch, successors bo Messrs. 
Hentsch & Burton, SIS? Clay street. Directors : FRANCIS BERTON and ROBERT 
WATT. 

This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to transact every 
kind of Banking. Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Se- 
curities in Europe. Deposits received. 

Hills of ££xc5iaii£C "ii New York, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool, Paris, 
Lyons, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Oloron, Brussels, Berlin, Hamburg. Frankfort, Geneva, 
Lausaune, Chaux-de-Fonds, Neuchatel, Frihourg, Bern, Aani, Soleuru, Baden, Dasle, 
Zurich, Winterthur, Shatfhausen, St. Callen, Lucern, Chur, Bellinzona, Locarno, Lu- 
gano, Meudrisio, Genoa, Turin. Milan, Florence, Rome. 

An Assay Office is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores 
and sulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any 
part of the country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo it Co., or by checks. 
[September la.l 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FHANCI&C0. 
©. O. MILLS President. | THOS. BSOWDT Cashier. 

AOENTS : 

In New York, Agency of the Bank of Oalfornia, No. 12 Pine street; in Boston, 
Tremont National Bank ; in Chicago, Union National Bank ; in St. Louis, Boatman's 
Saving Bank; in London, China, Japan and India, the Oriental Hank Corporation. 
The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast- 
Letters of Credit issued, available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the 
United States, Europe, India, China, Japan and Australia Draw direct on London. 
Dublin, Paris, St. Petersburg!!, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Hamburg, Bremen, Berlin, 
Leipsic, Vienna, Frankfort-on-the-Main. Copenhagen. Stockholm, Christiana, Gofc- 
ebong, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, New Zealand, Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama. • _ Sept. 26, 

• BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporate:! by Royal Charter.— Southeast corner of Cal- 
ifornia and Sansome streets. Head Office— London. Branches — Portland, Or- 
egon ; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

Agents : — New York, Bank of Montreal ; Chicago, Bank of Montreal ; Canada, 
Bank of Montreal ; Mexico and .South America, London Bank of Mexico and South 
America; Ireland, Bank of Ireland; Scotland, British Linen Company; England, 
National Provincial Bank of England ; England, North and South Wales Banks ; En- 
gland, Bank of Liverpool. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Deposits received on current ac- 
count subject to check, or on deposit. Exchange sold on Loudon and all the princi- 
pal cities and towns of Ireland and Scotland from £1 upward ; also on New York and 
all principal places in Canada. Commercial Credits granted available in Europe, 
China, Japan, South America, Australia and New Zealand. Approved Bills discounted 
and advances made on good collateral security. 

Nov. la. WM. H. TILLISOHA ST, Manager. 

THE NEVADA BANK, OF SAN F3ANCISC0. 
Paid Up Capital S5,000,000, in Gold. 

Louis Jit-Lane President. | J. C. Floort.. Vice-President. 

BT. K. Mas ten Cashier. 

Trustees :— J. C. Flood. .T. \\\ Mackay, \Y, 8. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, Louis McLane. 

Correspondents :— London — Smith, Payne & Smiths. Hamburg-- Hessy, Newman 
& Co. New York— Eugene Kelly 3s Co. Chicago— Merchants' National Bank. Bos- 
ton—Second National Bank. New Orleans— State National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. Oct. I). 

THE FIKST N4TrONAL GOLD BANK 0? SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paiil up Capital §2,000.000, Gold. President, K. C. Wool- 
worth ; Vice-President, D. Callaghan ; Cashier, George W. i-;, dman 
Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and China. Dublin : Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg : Hesse, 
Neuman &Co. Paris: Hottingneri Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce. Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Ban!; is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking husiness. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
received subject to check or on special deposit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain. Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credit? issued available in Europe, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prom pt returns made at the lowe:-t market rate of l.xcb an ■,-:-. Dec. 13. 

PIONEEE LAND AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, BAKK OF SAVINGS 
AND DEPOSIT. 

Southeast corner California ami Montgomery sf roots. Safe 
Deposit Block. Incorporated ISO'S). Guarantee fund. 8200,000. Ninety-first 
dividend payable on January 5th. Ordinary deposits receive U per cent. Term 
deposits receive 1'2 percent. This incorporation is in its seventh year, and refers 
to over 3.500 depositors for its successful and economical management 

II. KOFAI1L, Cashier. 
Tuos. Gray, President ; J. C. Duncan, Secretary. March 27. 



!.. 12, I 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



8 



A MACHINE MELODY. 



■ 

Kim. tly 

Ruml 
Wlti) ' iuD| 

In i 

u. ll t.. mention 

■ l invention 
To k 
ky arrangement that hobb 

.unt wobbles 
m elephant ilea 

An I itirs up til-' d 

.' AM 

Y\w « i kpieoe : 

While ■ 

II iv v, r been slicked with grease. 

The doga have all learned to fear it. 
And how] at the sound aa they mar it; 
You'll pause at the sound as you hear it, 
And wonder what h d spirit 

tinning and writhing in torture, 
In the midst of u regular sooroher, 

Ami wailing for speedy n 

d « i v 
When midnight pedestrians wander 
\> midnj hi pedestriana must, 
This mechanical anaconda 

Showers the Bidewalka with dust, 
Two old busted lanterns are gleaming 
O'er an [rial bag and steaming. 

He heeds not the solid blaspheming, 
With which all the atmosphere's teeming, 

ng Clay and Montgomery 
Without any Feathers or flummery . 
Like a saw-mill upon a bust. 

6 INTKIl MEZZO. 

At its horrible bestial roaring 
Sleepers kick off the clothes. 

As von pass it. the dust conies pouring 

Into your eyes and nose, 
You utter a wild imprecation, 
Yon stutter a "hellan 1 dam nation," 
Then mutter total an-ni-hilation, 
As you feel a peculiar vibration 

Tingle all the way down tu your toes. 

/ GIQUE. 
Oh, why should such an invention 

Uome from the gay George B., 
It could hardly have been his intention 

To smite us so mercilessly; 
We've all heard him speaking, and after 

The round of the banquet meats, 
We've bubbled all over with laughter, 

At the wit in his happy conceits, 
But will cordially state 
We eau't tolerate 

His manner of cleaning the streets. 



" PUNCH'S " GOOD RESOLUTIONS FOR 1876. 

The Pope has resolved to invite the King of Italy to spend a few days 
with him in the Vatican. The Sultan has resolved on energy, economy, 
and reform. The ruler of Egypt has resolved to take England as his 
model. The Spaniards have resolved to give over fighting among themselves. 
The Irish have resolved to desist from agitation. The Ultramontanes 
solved to cease troubling the world.' The Clergy of the Established 
Church have resolved to forget their differences (and the Burials Bill) and 
to unite in grapplinir with vice, ignorance, misery, and crime. Mr. Glad- 
stone lias resolved to return to political life. Mr. Disraeli has resolved to 
reform the administration of the Navy, and to be most careful for the 
future in his selection for Chief Commissionerships and other important 
ippointments. The First Lord of the Admiralty has resolved to join a 
man-of-war, for a course of instruction in practical navigation ; and after- 
wards to enter one of the dockyards to acquire some knowledge of ship- 
building. The new Peers have resolved to show their gratitude by the 
must assiduous devotion to their Legislative duties — attending every sitting 
of the House of Lords, and remaining to the close of the proceedings, even 
though they should be protracted to so late a period in the evening as 
twenty minutes of seven. The Government have resolved to increase the 
salaries of the Civil Service. The Leaders of Fashion have resolved to 
set the example of dressing with more taste and less extravagance. The 
usible Authorities have resolved to keep the streets clean. The Rail- 
ways have resolved to be punctual and accommodating. The Trustees of 
the Bristish Museum and National Gallery have resolved to throw those 
splendid Institutions open to the public six days in the week. The Mem- 
bers of the Royal Academy have resolved not to give good places to their 
own productions, unless they deserve tliem. Certain Newspapers have re- 
! solved not to devote so much space and attention to sensational crime. 
Our Domestic Servants have resolved to stay at least six months in their 
'• situations " without trying to better themselves. Our butchers, bakers, 
dustmen, fishmongers, greengrocers, lamplighters, milkmen, oilmen, turn- 
cocks, etc., have resolved to discontinue asking for Christmas Boxes. 



L VI DON ANT) 8AN FRArTCHCO B\NK (LIMITED). 
| lapll i, OOOjO I ii M it-it •3,000,000 la nun awl I ■■ mm 

nt, M S. I.ATIM 
ii \l UlTIN i 

: | , . . , 

l ■■.-■!, 

October 23, 

SAN FRANCI8C0 SAVINGS UNION, 
X*iO California »teeoi. corner Webb, capital mni Re- 

•If* 4 »n 

i . i ■ 

ton l-iril.ti. ' 

.: I i I I . til i ■ 

ad an I nlted m I 

oqulvmki Oetob 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital £300,000.— Office 596 California street, 
North siii''. betw ,uj . rrom i u 

■ bout "ii Baton -. [ng .-r Deposits only. 

aadeon Real Estate and other collateral current rates of I I 

"i L. QOTno. Secretary GEO. LETTE, 

oiaa- i 
r Etoadtnjf, Bl SehmladaD, Chaa Kohler, Ed Kruso, Daa Heyer, Chaa tfclneclai 

i :. mi.,.- r-... j.-,.], ] 



THE ANGLO-CAHFORNIAN BANK (LIWITID). 

4 k)i) California street, Smt Franclaeo.— Ix»ndon ©nice. 3 
— I- -». -*.■ AngolCourl ; New Vorii kgeni , J. W. Sellgman& Co., 21 Broad street 
Authorized Capita] Stock, 16,000.000. Will receive Deporita, opon Accounts, make 
Collections, buj and bcH Exchange and Bullion, loan Money, and issue Letters uf 
Credit available throughout the world, FRED. P. LOW, ■ 

Oct 4. IGN. STETNHART, 



Managers. 



MARKET STREET BANK OF SAVINGS, 

No. 634 Market street, opposite Palace Hotel. Ordinary, 
Special and Term Deposits received, Honey Loaned on acceptable aecurity for 

SO, ,; I '- 1 ' 1 days, and for louder periods on Mort'^c'e security. Interest allowed on 

average balances, also on Special and Term Deposits. 

HIRAM ROSEKBANS, President ; WILLIAM J. CONOLLY, Cashier ; THOMAS B. 
LEWIS, Seeretary. October a. 



MASONIC SAVINGS AND LOAN BANK, 
rf* Past street. Masonic Temple, San Francisco. Guarantee 

\f Capital, 9160,000, Moneys received on Term and Ordinary Deposit Dividends 
paid semi-annually. Loans made on approved security. Certificates of Deposit is- 
• ued payable in New York, Philadelphia. Boston, and principal cities of the Atlantic 
States and Canadae. WM. Ii. CULVER, President ; Francis Smith, Vice-President ; 
H. T. Graves. Secretary ; L. E. Pratt, Attorney. Hay 13. 



SECURITY SAVINGS BANK —GUARANTEE CAPITAL. ©300,000. 

Officers: President, John Pnrrott; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Secretary, W. S. Jones ; Attorney, Sidney V. Smith. Loans made on 
Real Estate and other Approved Securities. Office : No. 215 Sansonie street, San 
Francisco. Oct. 14. 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
/lanital, 85,000,000. — Alvinza Hay ward, President: C. W. 

\y Kellogg, Vice-President ; H. F. Hastings, Cashier ; K. N. Van Brunt, Secretary. 
Exchange and Telegraphic Transfers on all principal Cities. Collections made and a 
general Banking business transacted. August 22. 



411 



FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Bush street, above Hearuy, <*. 91 ahe. Director. Loans 

made on real estate and other collateral securities iit current rates of 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Savings and Loan Bank, No. Post street. Masonic 
Temple, San Francisco.— At a meeting of the Board of Directors <>f this Bank 
held January ISth, 1S7(J, a dividend was declared at the rate of nine (<)) per cent, per 
annum on TennDeposits, and seven and one-half (7£) per cent, per annum on Ordi- 
nary Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending January 21, 1876, payable on and af- 
ter January 22, 1S70, free of Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 29. H. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
rTThe HiberiiBU Savings and Loan Society, San Francisco, 

January 25, 1870.— At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Hi- 
bernia Savings and Loan Society, held this day, a dividend at. the rate of eight per 
cent, per annum was declared for the half year ending January 21, 1870, free from 
Federal Tax, and payable from and after this date. 
Jan. 29. EDWARD MARTIN Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Otl<l Fellows" Saving's Bank. ---The Board of Directors or tlie 
Odd Fellows' Savings Bank have declared a Dividend at the rate of nine (9) 
per cent, per annum on Permanent Deposits, and of seven and three tenth (7 3-10) 
per cent, per annum on Short Deposits, for the semi-annual term ending December 
81, 1875, payable on and after January 24, lS7u. JAS. BENSON, Secretary. 
San Francisco, January 10 , 3-^70. Jan. IS . 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and toan Society, 619 Clay street.— At a mcctiiig- 
of the Board of Directors, held January 11th, 1876, a dividend, free of Federal 
Tax, of nine (9) per cent, per annum on all deposits, for the six months ending Decem- 
ber hist, lS7f>, was declared, payable on and after the lf>th instant. 
j an . 22. CYRUS W. CABMANY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The French Saving's and Loan Society has declared a div- 
idend of nine (9) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax, for the half year 
endiiv December 31st, IS?;"., payable on and after January 17th, 1870". By order, 

Jau b 22. _"___ GUSTAVE MAHK, Director. 

" W. M. SEARBY, 

Drnssist and Pharmacist, SG9 Market street, opposite 
Powell, and Folsom street, comer Fifth, San Francisco. Choice Perfumery, 
lachela, Colognes, Scented Soaps, Combs, Hair Brushes, Tooth Brushes. Bath and 
Face Sponges, Cosmetics, and other toilet requisites. Feb. 5. 

FDKN1TUBE NOTICE. 

C^ooiln in *fc Co. have not yet removed, hut have replenished 
tt with an entire new stock of Parlor, Chamber and Dining Boom Suits. Great 
Bargains offered. GOODWIN & CO., , 

F ° D 5 No. :>12 Pine street. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 12, 1876. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 

California Theatre. —The three -weeks' engagement of Mrs. Emma 
Waller has at length come to a close, and to-night in her farewell per 
formance she will personate I/ucrezia. During her stay with us she 1ms 
proved her versatility by taking seven leading characters, two of which 
were Shakespearean, and the rest of them being of a tragic description. 
Her representation of the great, yet capricious Queen, Elizabeth, was one of 
the most refined pieces of acting we have recently witnessed. Mrs. Waller 
never suffers the individuality of the part she has undertaken to depart 
from her, and it is in this that her success lies. Her change from pro- 
found indifference to pleasurable excitement, at the reading of the final 
stanzas of Henri] the Eighth, was superb, whilst her acting in the throne- 
room scene surpassed anything she had undertaken previously. _ Mr. 
Keene, as the Earl of Essex, even exceeded our expectations of him in 
abundance of merit and diminution of rant. Her Lady Macbeth was good, 
but lacked that flavor of strength which Mrs. Waller generally imparts to 
her characters. It was modeled on Mrs. Herman Vezin's style, and was 
excellent in its entirety. Barton Hill's Macbeth was rather indifferent for 
him, though he seemed to warm up to his work as the evening progressed. 
Mr. Keene as Macduff ranted just a little at several points, but this may 
be excused when we remember the general excellence of this gentleman's 
late efforts. It would be well, however, to remind him that what draws 
forth the acclamation of the " gods " may not always be conducive to his 
reputation as an actor. Mrs. Waller's logo was the least interesting of 
her attempts. It is a sad mistake that nearly all fine actresses make when 
they throw off the charm and fitness of their womanhood, and endeavor to 
portray the more rugged outline of male character. Her lago was far 
from perfect, the impersonation lacking the manly vigor and the selfish 
villainy with which Shakespeare has imbued this ideal wretch. Mr. 
Keene's Othello showed how this inconsistant actor may sometimes c * tear 
a passion to tatters." The Dcsdcmona of Miss Wilton was a refined and 
lovely rendition of that much-wronged matron, her death scene being 
especially fine and artistic. A study of the exquisite costumes of this ad- 
mirable actress is an education in pood taste of itself. On the whole, we 
think Mrs. Waller's visit to San Francisco has added fresh laurels to the 
wreath of fame she had already won, and we shall bid farewell to-nitrht 
to one who has shown us to what high excellence the tragic art may be 
brought. 

Fabbri Opera. — So unknown was the title of the opera on the pro- 
gramme last Sunday, that speculation was rife upon the subject, some mix- 
ing it up in a mysterious way with Most e Egitio, and few questioning its 
novelty. Written at a period when oratorio was the fashion, and sacred 
plays suited the public taste, it would, from its character, be far better 
rendered on the concert platform than on the stage. The orchestration is 
exceedingly thin (this, however, suited the remarkably reduced orchestra, 
Madame Fabbri's economy has induced her to present), and the melodies, 
with very few exceptions, poor. The four principal characters, " Ben- 
jamin," Josef," " Jacob " and " Simeon," were represented respectively 
by Madame Fabbri, Hableman, Mueller and Pftuegger. The performance 
generally was devoid of interest, and may be said to have been the worst 
that has ever taken place under Madame Fabbri's direction. We may 
here offer a few words of warning to this otherwise able manageress. Un- 
due economy has often marred many a meritorious attempt to cater for 
the public taste. This we fear will be the case with her. She has had 
three packed houses, in a building holding two thousand five hundred peo- 
ple, and yet she forces on her supporters a meagre orchestra and wretched 
chorus, neither in the least improved in their change from Piatt's Hall. 
There was much excuse, during the last opera season, the capabilities of 
the later place precluding the possibilities of much expense. But one 
surely expects an improvement in the entertainment when the financial 
capabilities increase. At present the novelty of the new Opera House 
helps greatly to fill it on the Sunday night ; but when that wears off, 
Madame Fabbri will have to depend entirely on her good management 
and the improved class of her performances to fill the immense auditorium 
she now has at her command. We are glad to announce she will shortly 
have the assistance of Herr Wachtel, and perhaps of Mam'selle Titiens, 
later on. With a few appropriate changes in her stock company, an im- 
proved chorus, and an orchestra at least double its present capacity, 
Madame Fabbri, with the eclat of the two well-known artistes above men- 
tioned, may yet achieve a bright reputation as a caterer to the public 
taste. 

Maguire's New Theater. — On Monday, Manager Maguire reopens 
this house with Mrs. J. Oates' Comic Opera Troupe. There are some ad- 
ditions, and a few well-known faces will be missed ; but on the whole 
there has not been much change since her last visit here. Girofle-Girojla 
is to fill the programme for the first week, and she will, we presume, 
favor us with a repetition of her old repertoire. Among her novelties, how- 
ever, we notice Lecocq's Le Branche Casse, which attained such great pop- 
ularity in London on its production in December, 1874, at the Criterion. 

Maguire's Opera House. — Jolly Nash to-night completes his second 
week at this house. His reputation rests solely on his capability of mak- 
ing people laugh, for no one can listen to him without having their risible 
faculties affected. Out of this particular line his abilities are mediocre, 
and essentially of the Cojkney mrtsic-hall style. Billy Cartwright, with 
his elastic legs, continues to surprise people by his peculiar style of danc- 
ing. Outside of these two characters the novelties are few, though the 
programme is long. 

"Oh, my prophetic soul, my uncle!" exclaimed "Hamlet;" but 
we are informed that this was not an allusion as nowadays to a relative of 
the triple ball persuasion. It is what comes out of the spout rather than 
what goes up it that is the center of attraction just now. Messrs. Bush & 
Milne, plumbers and importers of gas fixtures, No. 29 New Montgomery 
street, have just invented and introduced a new silver-plated water-spout 
for bath-rooms and basins, from which -hot or cold water can be drawn at 
pleasure. Call and look at this admirable and inexpensiTe novelty. 

The preparations for the children's fancy dress and masquerade ball 
are nearly completed. Six gigantic cars, drawn by ponies, and several 
other attractive shows will take part in the grand march. A party of 
children, habited a la Skidmore Guards, and preceded by a brass band, 
will also appear, and the arrangements generally speak well for the man- 
agement of Mr. Barbier. There will be a meeting of the various commit- 
tees to-morrow, at 2 P.M. 



MESSRS. SAMUEL McKEE & CO. 

The emphatic success of these gentlemen in their newly-introdu<ed 
feature of Btock privileges (Puts and Calls) is one of the attractions of the 
Stock Board. The business of these wide-awake gentlemen has already 
more than doubled in the last three weeks, and we observe the most un- 
mistakable and substantial siytis of their prosperity and popularity in the 
increasing number of assistants they have found a necessity of their rap- 
idly accumulating business. If this satisfactory condition of affairs rested 
exclusively upon their enterprise alone, or upon their personal integrity 
and popularity, it would be more than surprising, but to these qualities 
are added a solidity and financial indorsement that explains the confidence 
and number of their customers. The most attractive feature of the now 
better understood and more highly appreciated system of "Puts and 
Calls" is, to the time-pressed business man, the simplicity and clearness 
of the transaction by which his operation is conducted. The complex and 
cumbersome method of margins, and the roundabout routine forced upon 
the operator by the old method of stock speculation is entirely avoided 
and done away with by the system introduced by Messrs. McKee & Co. 
To illustrate this fact one has only to pay a short visit to the admirably 
arranged and appointed rooms of these energetic brokers, 324 Montgomery 
street. Then- private offices, connecting with California street, are models 
of convenience and elegance. Their unique and effective method of in- 
forming the curious crowd before their establishment regarding the move- 
ments of the bulls and bears of the Boards, still attracts universal atten- 
tion and comment, and we notice several imitations of this particular one 
of their clever innovations in their immediate neighborhood. 

[communicated.] 

Wade's Opera House. — On Monday evening next Favchon will be pro- 
duced at this theatre. Miss Alice Kingsbury will take' the principal role. 
The piece will be mounted with new scenery, dresses, etc. The Maypole 
scene will be supported by the whole of the wps de ballet, and will surpass 
anything of the kind hitherto produced on this coast. 

Herr Theodore Wachtel, the unrivaled tenor of the day, whose Ut de 
porteur, is said to be one of the marvels of modern song, will arrive this 
evening, and will be serenaded at the Palace Hotel. On Monday he will 
hold a reception, for which numerous invitations have been issued by Mr. 
F. W. Bert and Madame Inez Fabbri. During his engagement he will 
appear in his most successful characters, and great preparations are being 
made at the theatre to give him adequate support. On Tuesday week, 
the 22d instant — Washington's birthday — there will be a special matinee 
at this theatre, and a series of tableaux will be presented illustrating the 
life of Washington. 

PAVILION SKATING. 

General Assemblies will be held in the mechanics* Pavilion, 
corner Mission anil Eighth streets, every Morning from 10 to 12, every Alter- 
from 2 to 4^, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Evenings from 8 to 10. (No Assem- 
blies Sundays.) 

ADMISSION PRICKS. 

To Morning Assemblies Free I To Evening Assemblies 50 cts 

To Afternoon Assemblies 25 cts | Tickets in packages of twelve S4 00 

Use of Skates on all occasions 25 cts. Dec. 11. 

WADE'S 0?ESA H0IHE. 

Mission street, between Third and Fonrth.— F. W. Bert, 
Lessee and Manager. Special Announcement. The manager takes pleasure 
in announcing to the public that he has effected an engagement with the California 
Favorite, the Fascinating Elfin Star, MISS ALICE KINGSBURY, whose former tri- 
umphs in this State, some eight years since, are still fresh in "the memories of her 
myriads of admirers. He will have the honor of introducing her to the California 
public on MONDAY EVENING, February 14th, in her incomparable personation of 
FANCIION, THE CRICKET, in which she stands pre-eminent at the head of all liv- 
ing representatives. Eox Sheet now open. Feb. 12. 

WASUIRE'S OPERA HOUSE. 

Bnsh street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny. ---T. Haguire, 
Sole Proprietor. — This Evening and Every Evening and Saturday Matinee. 
The Justly Celebrated and Famous CALIFORNIA MINSTRELS! Second Week of 
the Star Comique of the World, JOLLY NASH ! The Great Comedian, WILLIAM 
COURTRIGHT ! The Acknowledged Star Company ! Grand Orchestra of Ten Solo 
Artists, under the leadership of Prof. George T. Evans. Hr uses Packed Nightly. The 
Greatest Programme of the Season. Monday, February 14th— First Appearance of 
LA PETITE SALLIE DE ANGELIS, T. J. DE ANGEL1S, and JOHNNIE DE ANGE- 
LIS. Feb. 12. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bnsh street, above Kearny.--- John McCnllong-h, Proprietor 
and Manager ; Barton Hill, Acting Manager. This (Saturday] Afternoon, at 2 
o'clock— LAST EMMA WALLER MATINEE, when will be produced THE STRANG- 
ERS and GUY MANNERING. This (Saturday) Evening— Last night of Mrs. Waller, 
when she will appear as LUCRETIA BORGIA, in the Tragic Drama of that name. 
Monday, February 14th— JEANNETTE, from the French, by Barton Hill. Due no- 
tice will be given of the reproduction of OUR BUYS. Friday, February 18th— Benefit 
of MK. HENRY EDWARDS, Feb. 12. 

MAGUIRE'S NEW THEATER. 

Thouias Mag-Hire, Proprietor.— Comic Opera Season! Com- 
mencing MONDAY, February 14th. America's Favorite Prima Donna, MRS. 
JAMES A. OATES, and her Newly Organized and Augmented Comic Opera Company. 
Mrs. James A. Oates, Manageress. Magnificent New Wardrobes ! New Appoint- 
ments ! Complete Chorus and Orchestra! Every Evening and Saturday Matinee, 
until further notice, Lecocq's Famous Comic Opera of GIROFLE-G1ROFLA ! Box 
Sheet now open. Feb. 12. 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washington and Jackson.— -Samuel 
Tetlow, Proprietor; W. C. Crosbic, Stage Manager; E. Zinimer, Musical Di- 
rector. Monday, January 31st. LINA EDWIN and BLANK HOLT, Specialty and 
Burlesque Artists. PAUL MARTINETTI, ALFRED MAKTINLTTI, and -JOSEPHINE 
MICHELY, the Renowned Pantomimists. MISS KITTY HENDERSON and GEORGE 
F. MOORE, the Great Dutch Oomiques. COGILL and COOPER, Celebrated Song 
and Dance Artists. Feb. 12. 



WADE'S OPERA HOUSE. 

Mission street, near Third.— Frederick W. Bert, Lessee and 
Manager. This (Saturday) Evening— Positively the last night of SNOW- 
FLAKE. Last SNOWFLAKE MATINEE this Afternoon. Sunday Evening, February 
13th— The Fabbri Opera Troupe in the Opera of L'AFRICAINE. Monday Evening 
February 14th— First Appearance in eight years of the Witching Elfin Star, MISS 
ALICE KINGSBURY, in FANCHON ! "Special Matinee on Washington's Birthday. 

CHARLES LE UA\ 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Roc Scribe, Paris. 



ftb. 12, 1876.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



HER GHOST. 

ii faithful devofcloii, 

.n >>u lii- \"\ lumndu : 

!!■ : moulcta me u m Ughl tin- ooMn, 

W Ii. n .(«■.(> in tin- ipal] .•( it- delicate iplandor '. 

In him ;ili 

II v liver ; 

Hi- love b :<• urn. 

Tin- wring I.- tin luil, or the nun t" the 
An. I v. t there .*i> d*ya when the mat tion, 

'Hi. -lull free ,i'>>f old from all ihadov • <( error, 
Can wake in mj ipiril a dreamy dejection, 

v i i me discontent, an intan fible t <-i r.»r ! 
Anl death b m no part in the fear thai I cherish ; 

M> heart has its own mystic process of proving 
That love, when wi rtbilj perun, 

np int.> loftier powers of loi in : ! 
No. death cannot force me to tremble or falter; 

From causes more darksome my dread is engendered : 
Will Time, with its tyrannous changes, not alter 

The passion that now i-* so peerlessly tendered? 
Ali : w bat if tl»i> worship should wan-' and grow little? 

Should fade from the lervor l deem bo delicious? 
;i str ing are fidelity's bonds, they are brittle ; 

Though love may he loyal, it may lit- capricious ! 
Oh, this is tin- u'liost ttiat in ceaseless I'.Tsi-teucft 

Pursued ni' with cold, subtle whispers of scorning. 
And over the dearest delights of exisl 

Upraises one merciless linger of warning ! 

ART JOTTINGS. 

The closing reception of the Art Association was quite as well at- 
tended ss was that of the opening. The fifty additional works placed on 
u! proved quite an attraction, although may of them 
were unfinished. In most cases, no doubt, the artists were obliged to ex- 
hibit their .sketehes, having nothing completed at hand ; but why an 
artist who has about twenty finished pictures in Ids studio should put out 
a large work and label it unfinithtd, we are at a loss to know. Of course 
an uncompleted picture cannot be criticised, andsuchan exhibit is on a par 
with the burrowing of six paintings from those to whom he has sold or 
presented them for the purpose of avoiding adverse criticism. We hope 
ere long to si-f just one of this artist's highly finished works put where we 
it without rustling against aristocratic dimity or invading the 
sacred precincts of private property. 

< if course a detailed note of the pictures shown at the closing exhibition 
will be useless ln-re, as they are now scattered about town ; but we shall 
doubtless run against them now and again. 

Tojetti ha- out at Morris, Schwab & Co. 's another picture, which has 
one merit over most of his pictures, in that it is smaller in size — not as 
much .I it as usual 1 — a quality which we trust will lie more and more per- 
ceptible in the Signor's works until they become infinitesimal in their pro- 
portions, and are finally lost to view entirely. 

The Art School will open in a few clays, and hold possession of the gal- 
lery for the next three months. Why can't the school be accommodated 
in a portion of the gallery, and let the artists have the other portion to 
hang their pictures in during the Summer? 

Tracy's large painting of the battle of Sfone River will he on view week 
after next, it having just arrived from Paris. If it be a good picture, the 
subject will of course be lost sight of, but we have had about enough — and 
Eoo many — paintings which tends to continually refresh the memory upon 
a most disagreeable subject, and one of which our children will be heartily 
jtahamed for us twenty years hence. 

Mr. Schaus has returned to New York and taken his pictures tvith him. 
He has, doubtless, a realizing sense of the limited character of San Fran- 
psci . as a picture mart. There are too many here who are able and desire 
to buy paintings, but for some reason prefer to make their purchases 
abroad, in most cases to their great disadvantage. One case in point will 
illustrate this : A painting was brought here by the artist who painted it, 
from a European city ; it was offered to a gentleman for a certain sum ; 
he declined to purchase ; the following year he visited Europe and actu- 
ally purchased, among others, this identical picture for nearly four times 
the price at which it was offered to him here. There is nothing like col- 
lectors buying pictures in Europe — dealers and artists over there consider 
the American conuoisseur their fairest game, especially if they hail from 
California. 

SINGULAR DEATH OF AN APE. 
The wonderful resemblance of some of the larger apes to human 
creatures is especially remarkable when they are suffering from illness or 
from what, so great is their intelligence, we must acknowledge to be 
suit. iw. An ape of no common merit having lately died in the Zoological 
Gardens at Dresden, an account has been published of its last moments, 
which gives an extraordinary idea of the almost human dignity and pathos 
of its behavior on the occasion. A few weeks of the destroying malady, 
says a sorrowing friend, had been sufficient to change this being, so full of 
life, strength, courage — this magnificent prototype of all quadruman — 
into a spectacle of misery. The most complete apathy had taken the 
place of exuberant freshness and vivacity. Mafnka, as this interesting 
creature was called, appeared to suffer under a dim consciousness that 
she could expect no relief from, but only the alleviation, of her pains from 
those about her. This state of things lasted till within a few hours of 
her death. Then, as Director Schopf (the Director of the Gardens) leant 
over his favorite, the ape drew him towards her, placed her arm around 
the neck of her kind friend, and looked at him for some time with clear 
and tranquil eyes ; she then kissed him three times, with a short 
interval between each salute, motioned to be laid upon her couch, gave 
her hand to Schopf— as though bidding farewell to the companion of 
many happy years — and slept never to wake again. — Ecfto. 

Higher English branches of education, together . with French, thor- 
oughly taught by Prof. Dietz, Ph. D., formerly of Paris, where he 
graduated at one of the Colleges of the University of France. He also 
holds a first-class certificate from the Common School Depaartment of 
San Francisco. Applications may be made at No. 946, Folsom street. 



ELECTRICAL GUNNERY. 

The application of electricity in in j ,.i modern 

pii rj mderfiuly illustrated bj Ms Joble, H V, 

in the trials ol om hicii d in England, id 

[von bim a wide-world reputation as the author of 
valuable papor on the initial voloi n ith the tan 

gun. Before Noble's introduction of olectrloitj in the pi 

: .> re were no means ol ascertain!] . kind and ohi ■ 

powder were mosl suitable to a given caliber. By means ol bi ■ 

roy point in the tube, and after it 
I bi gun, can be ascertained as a matter of simple experiment, and 
in this way the right size «>f grain, the best materials tor its manufacture, 
the proper deneitj and most efficient charge, have been ascertained by 
simply Bring twelve rounds. As each round cost 625, the Baving of the 
country's money in obtaining a maximum know ledge of the capabilities 
of the new gun with a minimum expenditure, is at once apparent The 
powder best adapted for the 81-ton gun, so as to attain the highest effi- 
ciency with the least strain in its present Btate, has been found in this 

way, to be a charge of 230 j nds ol pebble powder, 1-7 cubic inches in 

size, and with a shot of 1,250 pounds. 

The utilisation of electricity in firing guns at proof in equally import- 
ant. The guns at the Government proof butts were formerly fired by 
fixing a piece of port fire over the vent, igniting it, and then running 
undercover. On two of three occasions the gun burst, tin- fragments 
struck adjacent guns, with the port tires ignited and swinging them round 
with the muzzle pointed toward the town, discharged their shot into the 
dock yard. An accident of this kind by the Kl-tnn gun turning round, 
would not be a question of a 40-pound shot dropping into the town ..f 
Woolwhich, but of a projectile of nearly three-quarters of a ton falling 
into the heart of the city. Such a contingency with the improved method 
of firing guns by means of electricity, as introduced by Professor Abel's 
electric tube, is extremely improbable. The priming charge of this tul e 
consists of sub-phosphide and sub-sulphide of copper, with a little chlc- 
rate of potash, and into this composition the terminals of two insulated cop- 
per wires in connection with a magnetic exploder are imbedded. The points 
of the wires are one-sixteenth of an inch apart, and when tue. current is 
sent along the wires, by pressing a button in the instrument-room, it 
passes from one wire to the other in a spark, by which the tube is ex- 
ploded, and comparative immunity from danger is thus obtained." — Daily 
Tthgraph. 

Slowly but surely our people are getting the rapid transit they so 
much needed. To-morrow tlie cars will run on the Elevated Railway from 
the Battery to Central Park, and thereafter we shall have forty through 
trains a day each way, accomplishing the distance in about thiry minutes, 
or half the time required by present conveyances. This is something, but 
is only the beginning of good things ; and it is to be hoped that by the 
opening of spring the opposition of the Third Avenue route will be prac- 
tically overcome, so that work can be commenced on that line. It has 
been rumored that Vanderbilt proposes to run light trains from Mott 
Haven to Thirty-second street, there exchanging steam for horse-power, 
thus bringing passengers to the City Hall without changing cars. As such 
an arrangement might possibly accommodate the people in the upper sec- 
tion of the city it is decidedly improbable, at least until the Third Avenue 
elevated road is fairly under way. It is surprising how accommodating 
and public-spirited a sufficient opposition will make a railway corporation. 
— N. Y. Graphic 

The solid silver menu used at the Sharon banquet at the Palace 
Hotel on Tuesday evening was chiefly commendable as furnishing a steady 
and enduring' item for the newspapers for the next six months. The vital- 
ity and perennial recurrence of an item of this nature is something aston- 
ishing. The statesman may die comparatively unnoticed. The soldier 
may bedew the smoking rampart with his blood, and be the topic of a sin- 
gle hour ; hut the astounding circumstance — the amazing fact — that Mr. 
Sharon's dinner was embellished by engraved silver bills of fare "as large 
as an imperial photograph and as thick as a trade dollar," will stare at the 
reader of every newspaper in the land for the next six months. We dis- 
credit entirely the uncomplimentary reflection upon the Ne\ada people 
embodied in the rumor that one of these metallic mementos was exhibited 
the next morning in the window of a pawn shop. This report is simply 
absurd, as there was no member of the Board of Supervisors invited. 

Centennial Invitation, — Oh ! come, With fife and drum, And the big 
brass band, From all over the land, And celebrate And dedicate The 
Great Centennial ! The young, The old, the stroDg, And every one, From 
Stonington To clime perennial ! Come, Come ! And make things hum, 
With the big brass drum, And hearty cheers and noise — Men, women, and 
the boys, And girls and little ones, With banners and pop-guns — Celebrate 
and dedicate The great day of the nation ! Oh, come from all creation ! 

Probably no man in New England is such an extensive breeder of 
fancy poultry, at least for pleasure alone, as Anthony Sheffield, of Flor- 
ence, who has spent thousands of dollars and years of time in gathering 
his fine collection. Quite a number of buildings are used, but the main 
house is 30 by 125 feet, two stories high, the sides facing the east and 
south, one of them being glass. The partitions are of wire, and the floor 
concrete, and the temperature is kept uniform by a coal stove. 



PHILADELPHIA LINE. 

Philadelphia to San Francisco.— The Favorite Clipper Ship 
CARRIER DOVE, Robert Merryman, Commander. This vewscl is now in berth, 
will have prompt dispatch, and be followed by other first-class vessels. For freight 
annlv in Philadelphia tu H L. GREGG & CO,, 108 Walnut street, or here and in New 
YoVk to [Feb. 12.1 WM. T. COLEMAN & CO. 

SANITABY WATER CLOSETS. 

Jenning's Patent London Water Closet, American Defiance 
Patent Water Closet, Carr's Eastern Patent Water Closet, Smith's California 
Patent Water Closet, and all late improvements in Sanitary Traps, etc. 

Feb 12 _ THOMAS DAY, 122 and 124 Sutter street. . 

PLUMBEES' GOODS. 

The Most Complete Assortment in the City. 
Feb 12 THOMAS DAY, 122 and 124 Sutter street. 



Tod Robinson]. 



[H. H. Soott, Member ft. F. Stock and Esch. Board. 
JH. H. SCOTT & CO., 



Commission Stocfe Brokers, 307 Montgomery street (Nevada 
Block), San Francisco. Money advanced on Stocks. *eb. iz. 

= 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND . 



[Feb. 12, 1876. 



WHEN? | 

If I were told that I must die to-morrow, 

That the next sun 
Which sinks, should li>-;tr me past all fear and sorrow 

For any one. 
All the fight fought, and all the short journey through, 

What shoitld I do? 
I do not think that I should shrink or falter, 

But just go on, 
Doing my work, nor change nor seek to alter 

Aught that is gone ; 
But rise and move and love and smile, and pray 

For one more day. 
Aud lying down at night for a last sleeping, 

Say in that ear 
Which hearkens ever, " Lord, within thy keeping 

How should I fear?" 
And when to-morrow brings Thee nearer still, 

Do Thou Thy will." 
I might not sleep for awe ; but peaceful, tender, 

My soul would lie 
All night long"; and, when the morning splendor 

Flashed o'er the sky, 
I think that I could smile, could calmly say, 

"It is His day." 
But if a wondrous hand from the blue yonder 

Held out a scroll 
On which my life was writ, and I with wonder 

Beheld unroll 
To a long century's end its mystic clew 

What should I do ? 
What could I do? O Blessed Guide and Master, 

Other than this — 
Still to go on then as now, not slower, faster, 

Nor fear to miss 
The road, although so very long it be, 

While led by "Thee ! 
Step by step, feeling Thee close beside me, 

Although unseen ; 
Though thorns, though flowers, whether the tempest hide Thee, 

Or heavens serene — 
Assured Thy faithfulness cannot betray, 

Thy love decay. 
I may not know, my God ; no hand revealeth 

Thy counsels wise ; 
Along the path no deepening shadow stealeth, 

No voice replies 
To all my questioning thought, the time to tell, 

And it is well. 
Let me keep on, abiding and unfearing, 

Thy will always, 
Through a long century's ripe fruition, 

Or a short day's. 
Thou can'st not come too soon, and I can wait, 
If thou come late. 

[communicated.] 
street preaching. 

Editor News Letter. — Dear Sir : As a large and intelligent portion 
of our community look to the News Letter as the acknowledged champion 
of public justice and the recognized defender of individual rights, I, as a 
parson representing a large devotional element in our people, desire, 
through the columns of your peerless paper, to lay before the public a sol- 
emn protest against a crying evil in our midst. We are afflicted with 
howling fanatics, who, with meaningless bellow, roar through a long cata- 
logue of lectures, embracing every tenet and dogma, from Judaism to 
Spiritualism and Mormonism. But these lectures are usually delivered 
in some hall that rears its princely walls between the general public and 
the sickening spectacle of a few devotees, weeping over a mangled subject 
murdered in the most barbarous manner. We are bounced, badgered, and 
bullied by swarms of itinerant venders of sacred and profane literature, 
embracing an endless variety of ideas, emanating from the muddled brains 
of hordes of egotistical aspirants for public notoriety. The peddler of 
modern inventions, Yankee notions, aud patent medicine, although a 
bore, pays his license, and has a legitimate business. But the king of 
boredom, the high priest of imprudence, is the man who, stumbling up 
the ladder of religion, reaches only the ci'owningapexof brazen effrontery, 
and, as a street preacher, hurls hell and damnation at an unoffending 
public. Of all the parasites that gnaw at the vitals of the body politic 
there are none who hold on with more tenacity than the street preacher. 
Of all the insects that creep and crawl through the varied ramifications of 
civilized society, the street preacher is the most pestilent. In the economy 
of nature the gnat, the fly, the wofca, the bug, the roach, the rat, and all 
other vermin have their sphere of usefulness ; and the human form deviue 
can fence itself in with flea powder, rats bane, bedbug poison, catch fly, 
and various other remedies to stop the inroads of those insidious insects 
and vermin. But against this humbug of a street preacher we have no 
defence. He covers over the sins of half a century with the mantle of re- 
ligion, and with the sacred sign of the cross in one hand and the holy 
Bible in the other he stalks, with unblushing effrontery, through the high- 
ways and byways of our city, and tells us in the most villainous English, 
that he is inspired. He may be ; we don't doubt it ; every one is ; but 
the inspiration of the average street preacher is of a very low order and 
from a very doubtful source ; and his beliefs and experiences are totally 
uninteresting to the general public. He is too lazy to work, but begs 
money with a sublime assurance beautiful to behold, usually appropriat- 
ing the funds obtained in the name of Jehovah to his own personal needs. 
We, the regularly ordained and authorized expounders of religions, have 
expended much time and money in acquiring our trade. There has been 
erected for our use elegant and commodious edifices, from which we dis- 
pense the gospel at a handsome salary ; and we enter our solemn protest 
ist being compelled to enter into competition with the average street 
preacher, who starts in business with no capital of either money or brains, 



and drags onr system of balvation through the mire and slum of the city, 
peddling ov the beautiful romance of religion to the mudsills of society 
tor a few paltry dimes. An exhibition of this kind occurred last Sunday 
afternoon in front of James 1 Block, West Oakland. About 4 P. M. there 
appeared on the street four lean, lank, hungry-looking disciples, armed 
with a Bible, a hymn book, and a few printed ballads. The quartette 
drew ug in front of a liquor saloon in the form of a hollow Bquare, and 
immediately commenced a vigorous assault upon the peaceable citizens 
congregated about the saloon. They opened the proceedings by inviting 
the crowd to come to the Lord. There was no answer, but a smile of de- 
rision overspread the countenance of every one present at the idea of leav- 
ing Oakland under any circumstances. 'Xhis raised the ire of the quar- 
tette, and the Christian devil was plainly visible in the faces of the 
saintly four, who then uncorked their vials of wrath, and hurled hell and 
damnation at the heads of the multitude. Cargoes of red hot coals and 
tons of burning sulphur were scattered among the crowd with a wanton 
recklessness that was frightful to behold. But it was of no avail. They 
did not scare worth a cent ; but human endurance had reached its limit, 
and about this time patience had ceased to be a virtue, when a venerable 
old gentleman stepped forward and spoke. He denied the existence of 
the God of the Christian, and offered to wager $1,000 against £500, and 
raise the figure to any amount, that no minister of any gospel could prove 
the existence of the deity he worshiped. He said the Christian world had 
been seeking for 1875 years for evidence to support their theory of an in- 
dividual God, and had, he thought, utterly failed. He went on to say 
that the wickedness of the world to-day was a sad commentary on the 
teachings of Christianity, and that he wanted no better evidence of the 
non-existence of a God than the fact that such creatures as revivalists and 
street preachers exist. "Here," said the venerable old gentleman, taking 
a shining silver dollar from his pocket, "here is my God, and every one's 
God — the Almighty dollar ; here is something to tie to ; it represents 
everything worth having ; with it you can purchase the world ; without 
it you cannot procure a cup of cold water. Stick to it, and when called 
upon it will always respond. The 'Almighty Dollar' is the only God 
worshiped in common by all humanity — Christian, Pagan, Turk, and 
Jew — all bend the supple hinges of the knee in deep devotion to the shin- 
ing deity. We all live for it, fight for it, and die for it. With the Al- 
mighty Dollar we think we can steer clear of purgatory, and bridge over 
hell. It is the one potent power that sways humanity as a unit. Amen," 
I am sorry to say the old man captured the audience, and the four street 
preachers were left without a hearer. So potent is cheap blasphemy with 
the scum of the streets with whom it originates. 

The earth is still surging round in space. 

Man dies, and another one takes his place. 

From whence he came, or where he may go, 

No one knew, or ever shall know. 

Yours solemnly, The Parson. 

The Oaks, February 1, 1876. 



J. B. Chapmax.] [Established in 1859.] [Joux Bauer. 

CHAPMAN & CO., 

Contractors for JVight Work.— Vaults. Cesspools, Sewers, 
Yards, etc., cleaned. Sewers repaired and properly laid. Office: SIS Dupont 
street, between Bush and Sutter, San Francisco. Nov. 20. 

ENGLISH BRANCHES, 

Together with French Language anil Literature, tn us hi by 
Prof. Dietz, Ph. D. (University of Fiance). Holder of a First-Grade ": 
Certificate issued by the City and County Board of Examination. Department of Pub- 
lic Schools, Sau Francisco. 940 Folsoui street, near Fifth. Jan. 1. 

R. H. Lloyd.] LLOYD & NEWLANDS, [F. G. Nswi^hdh 

Attorneys-at-Law. Offices: Rooms O to 13, Xevmia Block, 
first floor. Dec . 11. 

Fbed'k A. Elliott. Chas. Will.mot. Joitx S. Bcgbkb. 

-SWAN BREWERY COMPANY, 

Brewers and Bottlers of the Swan Ales ami Porter. 
Brewery, Bottling Establishment and Main Office, Southeast corner Fifteenth 
and Dolores streets, San Francisco. May 29. 

SNOW & MAY'S AST GALLERY. 

Now on exhibition, the " Capture of the Serai»is." by Mr. 
James Hamilton, together with a choice collection of European Pictures. Ad- 
mission, 25 cents. Jan. 1. 

\ £T PRINTS -^a 

-537 SACRAMENTO STREET, 
) BELOW MONTGOMERY. 



JBRTJCE, 



Wm. H. Stewart.] STEWART & GREATH0F5E, [C. It. GjiKAuiorse. 

Attorneys-at-Law. Rooms 42. 43. 45 and 46. Nevada 
Block, San Francisco. Will practice in all the Courts of California. Nevada 
and the Territories. Dec. II. 



C. L. Crackbon ] 



C A. iKTJEDOCK & CO. 



<-'. A. MURDOCK. 



Job Printers. Successors to M. I>. Carr A Co., STo. 532 Clay 
street, San Francisco. Cat. Feb. 3. 

STEIN WAY PIANOS, 

The Best Beyond All Depute, 

At Gray's New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street. 

[July 31.] 

WIILIAM HARNEY, 
"Vfotary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, northwest eor- 

_1_^( nor ui Montgomery and Sacramento streets, office of Madison & Burke, San 
Francisco. Jan. 8. 

G. H. MUMM & C3.'S CHAMPAGNES. 

Dry Verzenay, quarts and pints: Extra Dry. quarts and 
ptotiB, Kl'HL BROS., Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 522 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, Dec. IS. 

ST. VAIENTINE. 

Concert, Fancy Dress and Masquerade Ball for Children 
and Young Folk-, at Mechanics' Pavilion, Monday Evening, Feb. 14. Feb. ■"■- 

MBS. COB LETT, 

Tenelier Of English atari Italian Singing', the PianO FOrte, 
and Elocution, 331 Kearny street, Room 18. Jan. 2i>. 



i-yi.. u, tc 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



A PASTORAL 

too. 

. 

-<ililuiit \\ll 

bourn. 
\ 

Wilu S 
The 

Till >'i gloom. 

touched my shoulder with Fearful finger: 

Shi -.i.i, "Wo linger, we must not stay; 
My Sock's in .i [arj 

Behold tin-in yonder, how far they stray !" 
1 aura p you, 

No wolf noi , h ■..in- yearlin 

Ah ' ■ : aiiLT, a in. mi. 

Sin- whispered Nigbing, "There will be Borrow 

■ 1 to-morrow, if 1 toae to-day ; 
My fold unguarded, my Book unfold 
I shall be Beoltled and Bent away!" 
I. replying, " [f they '1- miss you, 

you when you get home ; 
An. I w.!l rewarded by Friend and uei 

a which you i 

Bekly, 
are weakly and slu-i-ji arc wild ; 
But il me, its none ro fervent 

I am a servant ami not a child." 

Tlu n each lint ember glowed quick witliin me, 

And love did win me to swift reply, 

"Ah ! do ■ a "' and none shall bind you, 

Nor fray, nor Hint yon, until I ilk- !" 

She blushed and Btar and ■ iod awaiting, 

A- if debating in dreams divine; 
But I did brave them— I told her plainly 

She doubted vainly, she must be mine. 
So we twin hearted, from all the valley 

hid mns./ rind rally her nibbling ewes; 
And homeward drove them, we two together, 

Through blooming heather and gleaming dews. 
That simple duty from grace did lend her, 
My Doris tender, my Doris true, 

That I. her warder, did always bless her, 
And often press her to take her due. 

And now in beauty Bhe tills my dwelling 
With love excelling, and undefiled ; 

And love doth guard her. both fast and fervent, 
No more a servant, nor yet a child. 



THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE MINT. 

The first Report of the Commissioner of the Japanese Mint for the 
half-year ending the 30th of the 6th month of the 8th year of Meiji, we 
have just received. Mr. Kinder has fully performed all that could lie ex- 
pected from him as the founder of this important establishment, and the 
R port speaks in very handsome terms of his valuable services. " While 
in the service," it says, " he has ceaselessly and indefatigably exerted him- 
self in Ins office of liirector, so that the progress at present attained by the 
Mint results chiefly from Ins labors." Simultaneously with the termina- 
tion of Major Kilmer's engagement the agreements of various European 
assistants also expired; but we note that the Japanese have appointed 
Mr. Edward Dillon, B. A., and Mr. William Gowland. Assoc; R. S. M., 
as their technical advisers, together with three other Europeans in the re- 
spective positions of engineer, coiner, and roller. The report under notice 
shows that the total amount of gold imported into the Mint during the 
half-year waa 43,840 ounces troy, and that the total amount of silver was 
47-, 039 ounces. Coins of all denominations, from copper rin to the gold 
twenty-yen piece, have been struck. A fact of some importance is stated 
in the report, namely, that the agreement between the Oriental Bank Cor- 
poration and the Japanese Government having expired, that institution 
has ceased to act as agents for them. In parting with them, as wirJh Major 
Kinder, the Japanese pay a hearty tribute to the manner in which they 
conducted all business committed to their charge. The coinage of gold 
during the period under review has been confined to the five-yen piece, but 
shows an increase on that of the previous six months. The coinage of sil- 
ver has been principally confined to subsidiary coins. A noticeable feature 
is that the " silver yen ' has now ceased to be coined, and is superseded by 
the "Trade Dollar" of 420 graius. In addition to its more serious busi- 
ness, we notice that "in obedience to a Government decree, the war 
medals are being struck at the Mint, numbering in all 3,077 pieces." Tues- 
days being kept as visiting days, the number of visitors from the second 
month to the sixth was over eleven thousand. 

NEW .BRITISH WAR SHOPS. 

The Admiralty have just issued a return of the ships building and or- 
dered to be built : The Inflexible, twin-screw iron turret-ship, armor- 
plated, of 11,105 tons and 8,000 horse-power, heads the list. She is build- 
ing at Portsmouth, and will probably be launched this year. She will 
carry four 81-ton guns mounted in revolving turrets, and will be the most 
powerful ship yet designed. The Dreadnought comes next with four guns 
in revolving turrets, and is of 10,950 tons, 8,000 horse-power. She mil, it 
is hoped, be afloat this year. A large number of names follow of ships 
unequaled by any other nation. The Thunderer, fouu 38-ton guns, 9,100 
tons, 5,000 horse-power, now at Portsmouth ; the Temeraire, 8, double- 
screw iron armor-plated ship, of $,412 tonnage, 7,000 horse-power ; the 
Nelson, 12, double-screw armor-plated ship, 7,323 tons, 0,000 horse-power, 
building by Messrs. Napier &, Son, Glasgow ; the Northampton, a sister- 
ship, is also being built by the same eminent firm. The Alexandra, 12, 
double-screw armored ship, 9,492 tons, 8,000 horse-power, at Chatham ; 
the Sfuinndn, 9, screw armor-plated ship, 5,103 tons, 3,500 horse-power, at 
Pembroke, are both afloat. Besides these heavy iron-clads, there are a 
large number of fast unarmored frigates building' and numerous small ves- 



1 

■ 
addition, 

■ i 
■ ■ 

: . | 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 

HUTCHINSON. MANN & SMITH. 

NO 311 CAM KO It MA STREET, WAX FKANCISCO. 

Lann oi 

1 ■ bis. 00 [ndlanumlJti, !ml N.w Orleans Inn. Asa' 

Pi iplo'l ln& Oo > . U< N,|. In., 'IY;in P. tm Pin- lr, < ,, 

Borne Ins. i'<> .. KOolumbu , Ohl 

i .■ ...I, ' - in- Co . 



1 ' L Co., 1 S \. Wash'n. D. C 



. \. v. i hrlouu 

I In . 

st Paul i . ■: m - .. 
Allan In- Co, . 

:- 1 "■ i ■ ■ 1 1 , 1 1 ■ i ■ 



Hartford i odd. 

Mew York 



Capital R( pre : omed, Twelve Millions. 
POLICIES ISSUED ON D] [RABLE PROPERTY AT FAIR RATES LO ES 
LBLi IDJ1 STED \M> PROMPTLY PAID 
HUTCHINSON, MANN a smith, General Affentfl, 

Doe. 5. yi4 California street, Ban Frani I ■ o 

HOME MUTUAL IN'UItANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

No. IO« i alllorula street, nextdoor to Bank of California. 
Fire Insurance Compaiu Capital, BSO0, Officbiu ; J, P. Houghton, 

i':. -.in ; Ut-o. II. H.iwiinl, Vice-President ; Charles K. Stun' Secretory 11 ij" 
BIQELOW, General Mauager, 

Directors. Sun Francisco Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Afherton.II F. Tcwheroachcr, 
A. B. Grogau, John H. Redington.A W. Bowman, C. 8, Hobba, B, M. Harl I rne 
l>. Conrad, wm. EX. Moor, George 8. Johnson, 1(. N. Tilden, W. M. Greenwood, 9 L 
Jones, Goonre s. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, w. h. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W, T. 
Gorratt, C. Waterhouse, A P, Hotaling-. Oregon Branch- P. Wassernian, i; Gold- 
smith. L. F Grover, D. Uacleay, 0. H. Lewis. Lloyd Brooke, J. A. Crawford, l>. Iff. 
Ft nch.J. Lowoaberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Lcdd, Treasurer, Uarys- 
ville — !_>. K. Knight San Diego -A. n. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch— Charles 
Crocker, A. ftcdington, Mark Hopkins, James Carolan, J. F. Houghton, D. w. Earl, 
Isaac Lehman, Julius Wetzlar; Julius Wet2lar, Manager; I. Lohman, Secretary, 
Stockton Branch— H. II. Hewlett, George S. Evans, J. D. Peters, N. M. Orr, W. F. 
McKee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, 11. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett. Manager ; N. 
M. drr. Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Bcldeu, A. Pflfiter, .). 
s. Carter, Jackson Lewis, X. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphj , J. .i. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Galley— William Watt, Robert Watt. Ne- 
vada— T. W. Sigouruey. Feb. 17. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

I^ire mill Marine.—C. IV. Kellogg, President; Charles A. 
Laton, Secretary. Gash Assets, January 1st, lfe7 r >, s4, r ,s,s:i« 01. DlBBCTOBS : 
W. W. Dodge, of W. W. Dodge .V Co., Merchants ; Claus Spreekele, President Cal- 
ifornia Snyar Refinery ; Seidell S. Wright, Judge County Court ; W. B. Cummin u-s, of 
W. B. Cunmiings &■ Co., Merchants ; bartlett Doe, of B. X J. S. Doe, Manufacturers ; 
Frank Eastman. Printer ; C. W. Kellogg, "f Wilmerdiu^ it Kellngg, Merchants ; A* 
W. Jee, Merchant; Peter Dean, Capitalist ; John H. Wise, of Christy & Wise, Mer- 
chants ; C. .J. Deering, of Deering & Co., Merchants ; Levi Stevens, of Stevens, Ba- 
ker .m Co., Merchants; A. J. Pope, of Pope & Talbot. Ship Owners, etc; Charles 
Main, of Main & Winchester, Merchants ; B. G. Crane, of Hayes, Hastings & Co., 
Merchants; W. L. Elliott, U. S. A. ; George L. Bradley, Capitalist. Sacramknio : 
H. S. Crocker, of II. S. Crocker & Co., Merchants ; N. D. Thayer, Capitalist ; F. S. 
Freeman, of Woodland, Capitalist ; D. H. Haskell, C. P. R. R." Office in San Fran- 
cisco : No. 238 California street, Tallant's New Bank Building, N. E. corner Califor- 
nia and Battery streets. May 22. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE.— UNION JfcS. CO. OF S. F. 

Tbe California Lloyds.— Established iu 1861.— Jfos. 416 and 
41S California street. Cash capital £750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed 51,000,0X0 
Coin. Fair Rates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
- San Francisco— J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, N. J. T. Dana, M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoine Borel, Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. C Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool, A. Weill, N. G. Kittle, Jal ez 
Howes, Nicholas Lulling, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustave Touchard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox, T Ltm- 
men Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindenherger. Sacramento— Edw. Cadwalader, J. F. 

Houghton, L. A. Booth, Makvsvillk— L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. PortlJInd, O. 

Henry Failing. New York— J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GUSTAVE TOUCHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles d. Haven, Secretary. Geo. T. Boiien', Surveyor. Oct. 26. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FEBU-1 A?aTI» MARINE. 

Clash Assets, 8450,000.— I'rineigial Office, 409 California 
J street, San Francisco. Officers :— Peter Donahue, President ; A J. Bryant, 
Vice-President ; Charles H. Cushxhg, Secretary. Board ok Directors : — Peter Dona- 
hue, James Irvine, C. D. O'SulIivan, J. D. Coughlin, R. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, 
R. Bailey, E. W. Cnrhert, George 0. McMullin, A. J. Bryant, Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, 
H. H. Watson, Alexander Austin, P. J. White, W. A. Piper, M. Mayblum, Richard 
Ivers, John Rosenfeld. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John G. Downey, F. P. F. Tem- 
ple, Los Angeles. Wm. Bihler, Sonoma County. H. W. Scale Mayficld. C. T. Ry- 
and, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY, FiRE AND MARINE. 

Establislietl 1859. Capital $5,000,000: Paid Fp Capital, 
81,200,000; Surplus Assets, 8374,400. Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 
Underwrite, through the medium of their Agents, against loss by fire of every de- 
scription, and for voyage or time on Hulls, Merchandise, Freights, etc., to and "from 
all parts of the world, at the current rates of premium. Claims adjusted and paid 
in San Francisco, London, Glasgow, or any of the Company's Australian or New Zea- 
land offices, at the option of .the insured. HUGH CRAIG, 
May 1. Agent for California, No. 307 California street. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE-INSURANCE CO., OF U0ST0N, 

Has transacted the business or l,ife Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April 23.] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Losses Pnia— $2, 820,000. —A sterling- California Co., with 
a national reputation for promptness and fair dealing, gained during thirteen 
years of service. Assets— £7 f>3, 407 f>7. 

D. J. STAPLES, President ; ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President. 
Geo. D. Dorin, See. ; W. J. Duttox, Ass't Sec. . Jan 29. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

(Capital $5,000,000. — Agents: Balfour, Guthrie & Co., No. 
J 230 California street, San Francisco. No. 18. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 12, 1876. 



DEATH OF REVERDY JOHNSON. 
The country -was startled and shocked yesterday by the tele- 
graphic announcement that Reverdy Johnson, the distinguished states- 
man and jurist, was found dead in the grounds surrounding the Executive 
Mansion at Annapolis. He was the guest of Governor Carroll, and diued 
with other gentlemen at the Executive Mansion just previous to the oc- 
currence. He was found dead in the yard by a servant. A special dis- 
patch from Annapolis, giving the following particulars of the melancholy 
event, was received last evening; ''At dinner Mr. Johnson appeared in 
excellent spirits and his usual health, and entertained the company by his 
conversation and relating anecdotes. At dinner he took one glass of Ma- 
deira, and refused to take any more. After dinner he suddenly asked the 
Governor to take him into the parlor. He took the Governor's arm, and, 
walking in there, sat down on a sofa. At the request of Mr. Johnson the 
Governor rejoined the guests at the table. Shortly after" a servant ap- 
peared at the door, and beckoning the Governor out, told him Mr. John- 
son was lying in the yard on the stones. Governor Carroll went imme- 
diately to the place and found Mr. Johnson lying on the cobble-stone car- 
riage way that passes under the porch of the mansion, close up to the wall, 
and close to a door leading into the basement. He had evidently gone 
down the front steps and around to the side of the house, and fell where 
found about 8:15 P. M. The impression is that he had been there at least 
half an hour. He was then dead, and was bleeding profusely from wounds 
on the right side of his head and face. His body was at once removed in- 
to the basement ioom, and physicians summoned. Dr. Wm. G. Tuck 
was first to arrive, and after examining the body, pronounced life extinct. 
Drs. Hideout and Cloud arrived afterward. There are large wounds on 
the right side of the forehead, two fractures of the skull from the 
upper portion of the forehead to the eyebrow, dislocation of a finger 
of the left hand, and cuts on the hands and legs, and several bruises. 
Mr. Johnson would have been eighty years old some time next May." 
By this sad occurrence the country loses one of its most distinguished 
and honored citizens, and the law one of the three or four great lights of 
American jurisprudence. The death of a man of such massive intellect 
and towering abilities is a serious and essential loss to the country. It is 
a matter of doubt if Mr. Johnson had his superior as a jurist in the 
world. Certainly his place as the head and front of our masters of inter- 
national law cannot be disputed, and his painful death lessened the galaxy 
of great lawyers in that " upper chamber " of famous legal lights inhabi- 
ted only by such representative names as O'Connor, Evarts, Paschal, 
Black and Curtis. Such a death is a public calamity. Mr. Johnson's 
fame as a public man has stood the test of most stationr, positions and re- 
quirements. As United States Senator, Minister to England, Counsel in 
1me Impeachment Trial, Member of the International Convention and the 
High Joint Commission, and in many other positions of grave public im- 
portance and responsibility Mr. Johnson has earned the respect and regret 
of the whole American people. 

THE STREET PAVING MOVEMENT. 

It is with some considerable satisfaction that the News Letter con- 
templates the apparently genuine movement towards giving us passable 
streets that has at last set in among the members -of the Board of Super- 
visors. The News Letter has harped upon this theme industriously, and it 
seems to some tangible effect at last. The proposition of certain inter- 
ested parties, and possibly some interested papers, to the effect that stone 
is the proper material to be employed in pavinsj our wretched streets is a 
most pernicious error, and one that cannot be too soon exposed. 

Stone is a costly, noisy, dirty and altogether unsatisfactory material for 
the covering of roadways, as has been demonstrated repeatedly to the sat- 
isfaction and conviction of every corporation in the East. The best, and 
and in fact the only, thoroughly unexceptional material for the paving of 
our streets is concrete or asphalt. In every way, and consulting every re- 
quirement of a perfect pavement this material is the best. We do not, 
of course, refer to the so-called concretes that consist of an unscientific 
and altogether crude combination of tar and gravel, but the thoroughly 
compounded and intelligently laid compositions of concrete and asphaltic 
materials now so popular in the East. There they are universally 
adopted, and have stood the test of use and experience. "We need such a 
pavement as the Scharff Asphalt, which bears a close resemblance to the 
famous Paris pavements, and of which there are, we understand, nearly 
eighty miles already laid in the principal cities on the other side of the 
continent. 

THE DECLINE DN SILVER. 

Very many ingenious theories have been promulgated by the press 
to account for the sudden and very marked decrease in the market value 
of silver. Like every commercial and financial movement of importance, 
this depression in the value of our chief commodity can be traced to the 
most obvious and simple causes. No fine-spun theories are necessary to 
explain this situation of things. The decline in silver is due simply to the 
two facts of the general movement towards its demonetization in Europe, 
and to the enormous increase of its production during the past year. The 
action of Germany, and the evident disposition of England and several 
minor continental powers to follow the footsteps of the former power 
towards the exclusion of silver as a legal currency, was immediately felt in 
the money centers of the world, and has been especially marked in our 
community, to which the world naturally looks as the producing reser- 
voir of the precious metals. The reports of some of our contemporaries of 
interviews had with prominent business and financial men in our midst on 
the subject give an amusing illustration of the pains taken to devise 
original and far-fetched individual theories to account for simple results, 
taken by the average business man whenever he ventures into the subject 
of national finance. 

THE SHARON BANQUET. 
Senator Sharon was on Tuesday the recipient of a farewell banquet 
from his Nevada friends, at the Palace Hotel, that, for unique splendor 
and the general magnificence of its arrangement, has probably never been 
excelled in this country. Among other features the bills of fare were 
engraved upon solid bonanza silver tablets, the guests retaining them as 
mementos of this truly Oriental repast. The Senator starts for Washing- 
ton on Sunday morning to assume his Senatorial functions. He will leave 
on a special hotel Palace car, and will be accompanied as far as Virginia 
City by a select party of' our social magnates, who will return by special 
train on Thursday. 



J. P. JONES. 

A voice cries from the widerness — But this is not the only note 

Stronger than John of old — His deep, strong voice has sung ; 

A voice cries from the Silver State, "Witness the time when on his lips 

And in the State of Gold A mighty people hung ; 

Finds echo; for these Western States "When words of burning eloquence 

Bow in the self-same boat, Made nations hold their breath, 

And California's hills repeat "While rank Inflation heard him sign 

Nevada's Silver Note. The warrant of its death. 



A note that on a nation's harp 

Struck by a master-hand, 
Fills every soul with wonderment, 

And vibrates through the land. 
The mightiest harper of his age 

These humble lines applaud, 
For he whose name we write above 

Has struck the Silver Chord. 



He stoops to nothing that is small, 

But works in mighty schemes — 
So grand they seem to other men 

Like castles built in dreams ; 
But his success doth this disprove, 

And naught can plainer show 
That talent, nerve and enterprise 

Will make a " man we know." 



SENATOR J. P. JONES. 

Our readers well know the Hon. John FT Jones. The Eastern press 
have made it their business from the first to discuss his peculiar character. 
Two years au'o the millionaire Senator from Nevada took by surprise the 
Federal Senate, the country at large, and even many intimate friends, by 
his bold stand against the further inflation of the currency. Coming from 
a Republican, his views might seem novel; addressed to a country ready, 
in its distress, to adopt any panacea, that even might seem harsh. It is 
only very lately that both parties in the Eastern States have positively 
announced their adhesion to his views. He seems to have made finance 
his favorite study. He never makes a speech without having mastered 
his subject. When once aroused he is as ready to state his own vie*-a 
consecutively as to change his attitude into that of the running debater. 
Interrupters find him armed at all points. His manner is forcible and un- 
studied. Those w r ho knew him as a boy in the northern part of Ohio, as 
an active politician in California, as a successful miner in Nevada, pro- 
claim that they find no change in him, save what experience and study 
have brought. 

His next effort, the press telegrams say, will address itself to finance 
once more. He is reported to be about to advocate the coinage of a home 
dollar, of such a standard as to replace the greenback advantageously to 
its holder, yet enough below par not to produce a monetary convulsion, 
something, perhaps, like the French five-franc piece, which would have 
the advantage of tendering a common want to many European countries 
whose silver coinage has been purposely made uniform to that of the 
French. We presume that his plan is more comprehensive than what we 
gather from the Eastern press, that the new issue will take place grad- 
ually, that subsidiary methods will be adopted to absorb the paper cur- 
rency into some kind of permanent interest-bearing national obligations. 
that due regard will be had to the present laws on silver fractional coins ; 
in fact we presume everything in favor of his plan from a heartfelt anxiety 
for a practical solution of this difficult question, and from our knowledge 
of his ability to "strike it rich " when he strikes. 

A high aim is his present one. The problem of the national currency 
is complicated. But all the aims of this man have been high. ' He seems 
to delight in handling difficult questions. Though a leader, he doeB not 
seem to lead. He sees a maze before him, and determines to cut a path 
through it. He does not stop to call followers, but takes his bearings, 
and straightway applies the axe to the underbrush. Whether operating 
at the stock board, or canvassing the field of politics, planning a Santa 
Monica chord to the Wilmington arc, testing Panamint and Kern River 
minerals, or underbidding nature in the manufacture of ice, Senator 
Jones is much given to act on his own individual judgment, keeping his 
own counsel, and looking to success for his justification. 



A SENSIBLE IDEA. - 

One sees on entering the New York office of Wells, Fargo & Co. a 
huge map of the United States, painted roughly on one of the side walls, 
and showing at a glance the railroad system of the continent. The ex- 
ample deserves to be imitated by our railway companies in their stations, 
where it ought to be a canon of the mural decoration that the geography 
of the road and its branches should be clearly spread out for the benefit of 
travelers. Tourists in France will readily recall instances of such treat- 
ment in the great depots of Paris. We learn from the last Polyb'Mion that 
the subject was lately brought before the Paris Geographical Society in a 
communication from the French consul at Rio. He called attention to the 
fact that the Brazilian Government obliges railroad companies to post in 
their stations certain geographical particulars concerning the locality, the 
province, and the whole territory of the empire. It appears that the Geo- 
graphical Society of Lyons had already taken the initiative in a similar 
movement for France, with a view, however, to voluntary action on the 
part of the companies. We wish the American Geographical Society 
might bestow a little energy in the same direction over here, where large 
and costly stations are constantly going up. The architects themselves 
could do much if they would only take the idea to heart. The Nation and 
ourselves heartily concur. 



nSSTXRANCE DIVIDENDS. 

It may be a matter of congratulation to stockholders to receive large 
dividends, but the public does not see it in that light. Large profits rep- 
resent a less than ordinary ratio of fires, and the bulk of them should be 
carried forward against the future when fires shall prevail above the usual 
proportion. Insurance stock is not generally held for speculation but 
for investment, and as such to increase security no more than ten or at 
most twelve per cent, per annum should be paid in dividends, the balance 
of profits being held until the accumulation makes forty or fifty per cent, 
of the capital. Then capitalize it, and declare dividends on the increased 
stock. No first-class company can fail to grow in business by following 
this course, and no company with an increasing line of risks can avoid it 
without serious future embarrassments. It is only a matter of time either 
way. 

In the Alta-Bulletin Libel Case Judge McKee has denied the 
motion to strike out all reference in the complaint to the Bank of Cali- 
fornia and the causes of its suspension. 



.^^'"■•^ 





"men we know ' 



PlATf 3. 



Feb. 12, 1876.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



9 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

■*H**r th- « rlarl ■ Whal tha osi I 

**Un« th»t mil play Ihc dsvU. Mir. wll 



The imperturbable Bowen, after having for moot mdtor- 

land tl the simple «x| inding his own 

nan as own counsel, 1ms at hut perated 

into making a clsan breast of ;i very di This was perhaps 

ft ■ 
»low the saving foundation Beecher had built t*"i" himself out of the parti- 
sanship of hia congregation, and t<> plunge the country oi 

pool. Hut 

town n|H.ii the devoted head of Bowen the united mal- 

na ion of every individual member of the Plymouth 

Stuck Company of Co-operative Sow C esuH i^ as inevitable 

simple. To-morrow a slow declining sun will hardly hide his dhv 

rammoations of the 

ids of the afflicted earth the Bret in- 

i abuse that will make that rash man's life a burden 

to him for the next six months. Day after to-morrow the Associated 

oonvey the information that Mr. 

ernuoua wives in distant localities. The im- 

. dually inculcated in the mind of the newspaper reader 

that he is n thief. < ! character will become merged into that 

of a blackleg and a ba tndler. A dark Buspit ion will be hinted that he has 

a weakness !*.-r other peoples' horses, A ii"ul>t as to hi* exact legal rela- 

d will be hazarded. A seducer and the three-card 

man will be held up as comparatively virtuous examples for his 

imitation: And finally, at the expiration of tin- requisite six months, 

there will be an unchangable public conviction that Judas tscariot was a 

martyr and Nero a persecated saint beside this hapless deacon of the 

Plymouth Rock upon which the great preacher has split. Such is fame ! 

General Babcock, that boon-companion and "outside man" of the 
gentleman at Washington, and who keeps an iron heel screwed on his left 
boot for tli<- impeacable and dramatic purpose of grinding our liberties in 
ISl ; is in the toils of the suarer. That whisky, whether "crooked" 
or not, is a snare, and always has been, remains an entirely self-evident 
proposition, Imt it seems that the gentleman whom Senator Edmunds de- 
.■- "" keeping a toll gate at the door of the White House" is chiefly 
imperiled anent the discovery of certain little billet doux of a coniidential 
aspect and financial nature, and which will he put in evidence as an illus- 
tration ..f tlii' undue cost of highway facilities in the vicinity of the Ex- 
tvntu •_■ Mansion for the past year or so. We were not previously aware 
that the present administration was suspected of a bias toward epistolary 
performances, or any other evidences of intellectual predelictions, but it 
seems that this accumulative Private Secretary, actually did write, 
th<>iiL;li he did wrong in so doing. Whether this military combination of 
Mei-jurv ainl Ananias will be forced to disgorge his ill-gotten alcoholic 
yams is a coiisumation to be hoped for rather than anticipated, but it 

Joints an obvious moral for the instruction and edification of all future 
residents and their Secretaries. And that is, that education is a dan- 
gerous and unnecessary, not to say a mischievous tiling. The public 

Bel Is, as regards the necessities of Chief Magistrates are evidently a de- 

In the next number of that fearless administration organ, the 
Washington Republican, we, therefore, confidently lookfor the following 
advertisement : " Wanted, immediately, a Private Secretary who takes 
his whisky in a liquid form only, and w/to can't write. Apply at the Ex- 
ecutive Mansion. 

To "split the ears of the groundlings," has been hitherto the exclu- 
sive prerogative of the robust followers of the Thespian art {Mr. Keene, 
for instance), but it seems that a jeweler of Sacramento has gotten into 
legal difficulties by the undue vigor with which he punctured the aural 
appendages of some fair customer while fitting them for the reception of 
his wares. An intelligent jury has awarded the claimant -SoOO for the as- 
sumed mutilation, and which comfortable sum will doubtless be expended 
in rendering the balance of the abbreviated members very attractive indeed. 
The Town Crier believes that he could lay his hand upon a number of in- 
dividuals whose entire ears disposed of at the above remunerative figure, 
would result in immense fortunes to the losers. But the devil beshrew us 
if we can discover why this sanguinary man of trinkets should have over- 
looked the innumerable opportunities to gain the gratitude of man legiti- 
mately by lessening the superfluous endowment in this regard of certain 
members of the State Legislature. There is Mr. Press-Gag Laine, for il- 
lustration. The Sacramento jeweler might have sated his yearning for 
auricular surgery by planing that gentleman's hearing apparatus down to 
endurable limits. Not only would this save this Senatorial son of thunder 
the annoyance of occasionally shutting those Titanic recipients of bad ad- 
vice into the tops of doors, but prevent, as well, the now constant mortifi- 
cation given to a useful domestic animal by the frequent comparison of it 
to this other equally adorned, but less intelligent, jackass. 

That dramatic cocktail, Mrs. Oates, is about to afflict this hapless 
community with another long drawn out season, made fearful by the fire- 
cracker explosions of her shrill pocket voice. The Town Crier has no 
covert desire to interfere with the dramatic critic of this paper, but it is 
rather too much for the forbearance of the average human being to con- 
template unmoved the announcement- that this combination of steel 
springs and red tights is to gyrate before the audiences at Maguire's next 
week, and to open her generously constructed mouth in ear-piercing as- 
saults upon the French composers. The slaughter of Offenbach by this 
irrepressible jack-in-the-box is of itself sad enough, but to read the list of 
new operas recently added to her 7-epertaire, and to witness, in the mind's 
eye, even, this abbreviated edition of the Magiltons flourishing her sinewy 
and vivid extremities through the immortalities of Verdi and Auber, is a 
spectacle sufficient to silence the heavenly choir itself. 

A San Jose exemplar of muscular Christianity the other day discov- 
ered a child in the act of being severely torn by a large dog. He at once 
f>ut a stop to this canine refection by dashing out the dog's brains. The 
ather of the child arriving at this juncture, and being under a slight mis- 
apprehension as to the exact status of affairs, promptly knocked the other 
man down and jumped on him. The father was afterwards incidentally dis- 
covered to have ten children. We should suggest the tolerably obvious 
moral that heroism in crowded localities is sometimes of less value than 
discretion. 



The despised Mongols i 
• alls "the u 

■ 
virtuou 

: ' . . . . 

line intruder a\ dei ■ 
neral rush foi 
lai i imn Itl ■■ In undress uniform was hi om| the 

aroused neighbors, and the desecrated apartment invaded in force. < in 
examination the burglar was found to have fallen asleep inhis felonious 
oocupation. 'I'd- bed was suddenly \i heeled away, and the valorous nod 
titude, armed with bed slate, Indian clubs and pokers, fell onthi an 
ting crack man like so many steam pile-drivers. .v ■ 
tttered up into a int. an in.-prrtiMii revealed the fan that it was the 
China hoy, who had fallen asleep that afternoon while hunting for a pair 
oi slippers. The brother of Wung Chung now dines with the family 
-lady, and does in* washing for the specially contracted rate of one hun- 
dp a dollars a week in advance, while one of the \<mhil; ladies aim-,- i,,. n . 
tioned fans the fevered brow of the macerated Celestial in the Becond 
story front, or assists her sister in running spired wine into his recumbent 
anatomy with a glass thin-. For tin- family's .sake we trust the incident 
will not get into the papers. 

''In the name of the Prophet Figs," We are informed that the 
minuet is to be danced by our Bociety belles and beaux at the Women's 
(we are glad to behold the good old word once more) Centennial ball on 
the22d. We dare say some of the former will endure with considerable 

BUCcesS the immediate suggestion of the galvanized puppets in the front of 
an organ their performance will give rise to, hut the latter doing the stilt 
and hinge business in .small clothes and silk stockings will he a sight to 
make the angels weep. We believe that a Tape Measure Committee has 
already been appointed, charged with the rigid investigation into the 
necessary development of extremities requisite to the male performer on 
this occasion. The gambols of the fatted calf are to be the feature of the 
entertainment, and our corpulent notabilities are coming to the front with 
a rush. With all this it would seem that a deficiency of the natural ma- 
terial will cause an unavoidable resort to the hollow mockery of padding. 
We are in momentary expectation of the receipt of an advertisement 
from the ladies in charge asking volunteers for this forlorn hope. An 
exact and approved sample of just what they require can be found behind 
the counters of the Palace Hotel. The Town Crier will open a new bottle 
of violet ink with which to review the coming great event, and this may he 
considered a gratuitous invitation to those desiring immortality to forth- 
with present themselves for the scroll of fame. 

A Youny lady at the Palace Hotel writes us to ask if it is really true 
that " those dear little shrimps " really eat dead bodies, and furthermore 
inquires " why they are not as nice as usual?" If our fair correspond- 
ent means that the dead bodies are not as nice as usual, we would reply 
that their want of appetizing qualities is one of the drawbacks to a resi- 
dence in this latitude. But if, as we apprehend, she refers to the slmmps 
themselves, as not nice, we respond that these nutritious creatures not 
only do eat dead bodies— there are certain physical obstacles to their eat- 
ing live ones — but their present impaired condition is due entirely to the 
absence of aquatic suicides lately. We emphasize this gentle hint to 
those contemplating untimely ends with the hope it may be acted upon. 
We also note this very proper complaint from a hotel guest, and suggest 
that if the aggregated avoidupois of a family not wholly unconnected 
with the management of the Palace be really eighteen hundred and forty 
pounds, an opportunity to perform a genuine public service presents itself 
that does not often occur. 

Mr. Bergh, that enemy of man and protector of quadrupeds, has 
sent us a touching pamphlet, yet moist with sympathetic tears, and in 
which he pathetically abjures us to wield our trenchant pen in defense, 
hereafter, of the whole Noah's ark of animals. We are not heartless 
enough to withstand this appeal, and hereby give over and forswear any 
further allusion to Press-Gag Laine's ears ; to the the feet of Michael 
Reese ; the pants of Dr. Mamie A. Walker ; the vinous and profane pro- 
pensities of Supervisor Boyce ; the grammar of the Bulletin ; the stupid- 
ity of " the Board " ; the vagaries of our friends, the brokers ; and the 
general iniquities and short comings of all those misguided people who 
prefer reading some other paper to the J^ews Letter. These we will spare. 
Behold, we have said it ! — at least until next week. Anything else in our 
line, Mr. Bergh ? 

An unprincipled Mathematician writes to know why we do not 
introduce a matematical department into this chaste family journal, and 
kindly offers as an initial exercise a problem to the effect that if a grass- 
hopper's legs be ten-sixteenths of an inch in length, and he hops two and 
seven-eighths inches at a hop, how long would it take him to go a mile ! 
We disdain a moment's consideration of this puerile endeavor, which we 
have relegated to the office boy ; but while we are about it, we would 
like to ask tins immature arithmetician what the exact difference would 
be on the next mile if the grasshopper legs were sandpapered off two- 
seventeenths of an inch shorter, and finally, the further result if the sand 
paper were given one more nib. 

The Town Crier is in receipt of a circular from Philadelphia, care- 
fully sealed, and which divulges the confidential information thatan exact 
duplicate of the Watch given by Washington to Lafayette will be for- 
warded " on the receipt of fifteen dollars and the postage." The Town 
Crier is further informed that this precious timepiece can easily be sold to 
the unwary as a veritable Centennial curiosity. The pen is paralyzed and 
the lexicon of denunciation rendered ineffectual before the snowclad as- 
surance of this last cheerful swindle. There is nothing, in fact, to be 
done under the circumstances but to inquire where we can find this inge- 
nious Philadelphian when we attend the Centennial. The Town Crier 
wishes to see all the national dead-beats on that occasion in due order. 

Those Slow and Exasperating swindles on wheels known as the 
North Beach Street Cars, are becoming serious subjects for sanitary in- 
vestigation. It is said that the City of Cologne has seventy-two distinctly 
different smells. That home of fragrant water and unfragrant streets is a 
garden of roses in perfume compared to the aforesaid cars. The rumor 
that the filthy straw used for the bedding of the horses also forms the 
flooring for the cars themselves, seems to have something of truth in it. 
Oh ! for a convenient earthquake on the line of these perambulating pest 
houses. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, AND 



[Feb. 12, W6. 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten Thousand at Home 
and Abroad. 



Two remarkable instances of the Prince of 
Wales' progress through India are recorded this 
week. One was the laying of the foundation- 
stone of the memorial which Lord Northbrook is 
erecting in Lucknow, at his own expense, to the 
native soldiers who fell in the defense of Luck- 
now. These men ought to have been honored 
sixteen year ago, and it is greatly to the credit of 
Lord Northborook that he has perceived the in- 
decency of the failure to do it. From a hint in 
Sir George Couper's speech on the occasion, we 
gather that the Government had been asked to 
make the memorial national, and had declined. 
The other incident was the reception of the de- 
scendants of Mirza JehanderShah, heir-apparent 
to Shah Alum, the last of the race of Timour. 
They passed before the Prince of Wales, saluting 
him reverently, but in silence. The ceremony 
might, we think, have well been spared. If these 
Princes, of whom no one ever heard before, are 
not of the line of Timour, they should have been 
disregarded ; and if tbey are, it is hardly digni- 
fied to make them acknowledge the English Sov- 
ereign. Napoleon would not have directed the 
Comte de Chambord to attend his leve'e. 

The suite of the Prince of Wale3 have been 
unlucky. Lord Charles Beresford fell from his 
horse very soon after the party landed at Bom- 
bay, and was left behind. Lord Carrington has 
now brokeu his collar-bone in the exciting pas- 
time of pig-sticking, but private dispatches say 
that he is progressing favorably, and will go on 
with the Prince to Delhi. The Prince is now on 
ground made memorable by the Mutiny, and Dr. 
Russell, who went through the campaign with 
Lord Clyde, will be a capital cicerone. It seems 
that ever since the landing in India the members 
of the suite take turns in watching over the 
Prince's safety at night, in addition to the ordi- 
nary guards. The precaution is due to a private 
and spontaneous arrangement among the mem- 
bers of the suite themselves. It must add consid- 
erably to their fatigue, but cannot be called just 
now an unnecessary precaution, for the Prince is- 
in the district which was the very focus of the re- 
bellion, and in many a native bosom wrath and 
hatred against British rule, and the Prince who 
embodies British rule, must still survive. 

An Over-Zealous Indian Policeman. — The 
correspondent of the Temps, who has followed 
the Prince of Wales in his tour through India, 
relates an amusing story of an over-zealous police- 
man. While in Ceylon the Prince paid a visit to 
the Public Gardens at Colombo, and a zealous 
police officer noticing that a "tall gentleman, 
with a heavy beard," was following close behind 
him, went up to him, and said, in angry tone, 
" Why the devil don't you take your hat off, 
sir?" The gentleman replied that when he met 
the Prince, or had occasion to address him, he 
took his hat off, but that at other times he re- 
mained covered. As the policeman had not the 
power to compel him to walk bareheaded, he con- 
tented himself with hinting, in a menacing tone, 
" You had better stand back, and not dog His 
Royal Highness like that." The correspondent 
of the Temps adds that the policeman, when he 
ascertained that the " suspicious character" was 
the Duke of Sutherland, " was much astounded." 

There is a rumor afloat at St. Petersburg 
that the Czar would be pleased to see the Eastern 
Question solved by the creation of the Duke of 
Edinburgh Sultan of Turkey. The reason for 
this desire is further said to be that the Czar is 
dissatisfied with the position held by the Duchess 
of Edinburgh at the English Court. But, sup- 
posing the Duke became Sultan, what about the 
Harem ? It would have to be abolished, It will, 
too, when the Duke is transformed into the Sul- 
tan. 

It is stated that on learning the death of Sir 
Anthony Rothschild, the Prince of Wales imme- 
diately telegraphed to the family to express his 
sympathy. " These kindly attentions towards 
his friends," it is said, "are the 6nn basis on 
which the Prince's popularity rests." 

A Royal decree has been issued at Madrid 
excluding from seats in the Senate and Congress 
all public functionaries receiving a salary of £500 
and upwards, and also all generals in the army. 
The Government has authorized the publication 
of fourteen new journals. 

The approaching visit of the Queen to 
Coburg and Baden-Baden has revived the rumor 
of the marriage of the Princess Beatrice to a Ger- 
man Prince. 

Sir Anthony Rothschild has left the im- 
•mense fortune of £10,000,000. 



C. P. R. R. 

Commencing Tuesday, Feb. 1st, 1.876, and until 
further notice, Trains and Boats will 
Leave San Francisco : 
(Change of River- Steamer Landing to Market St. Wharf. 



7f\f\ A.M. (Sundays excepted), Vallejo Steamer u'rum 
,\J\J Market St. Wharf)— Con nee-ting at Vallejo "with 
trains for Calistoga-, Knight's Landing and Sacramento, 
"making close connection at Napa with Btagesfor So- 
noma." (Arrive b:55 p.m.) 



8A/j A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
• vfl/ laud Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding and Portland (O.), Coifax, Reno, Ogden and Oma- 
ha. Connects at Niles with train arriving at San Jose 
12:35 P.M. (Arrive 5:35 P.M.) 

8(\f\ A '- 11- (Sundays only), Vallejo Steamer (from 
.\y*J Market St. Wharf), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga and Sacramento, and at Napa with 
stages for " Sonoma." (Arrive 8:55 P.M.) 



O |)A P.M. (daily) C. P. R. R. San 

0.\J\J Train ( v j a Oakland Perry), stopping at all Way 



Stations. 



Passenger 
it all Ws 
(Arrive 9:35 a.m.) 



A nf\ P.M. (daily) Passenger Train (via Oakland 
•X.VJ'L/ Ferry), toStOCkton only, connecting at Lathrop 
with Express Train Eor Merced, \ isalia, Sumner, Caliente 
and Los Angeles; also at Niles with train arriving at 
San, Jose 6:55 p.m. (Arrive 12:40 p .m.) 

4 0l \ P-^L (Sundays excepted), Vallejo Steamer (from 
• "1/ Market St. Wharf), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Arrive 11:10 a.m.) 



4AA P.M. (Sundays excepted) Sacramento Steamer 
•vv (from Market St. Wharf), touching at Eenicia 
and Landings on the Sacramento lth er. Taking the 
overland third class passengers to connect with train 
leaving Sacramento at 9:00 A.M., daily. 

( Arrive 8:00 p.m.) 



OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA FERRY. 

From Sax Francisco to Oakland.— "Daily" — 7:00, 
7:30, 8:00, S:30, 9:00, 9:30, 10:00, 11:00 A.M. ; 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30. 0:00, 0:30, 7:00,8:10. 
9:20 and 10:30 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—6:10 a.m. 
and 11:45 p.m. "Sundays only" — 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. ; 
12:30 and 1:30 P.M. 

From San t Fraxcisco to Alameda.— " Daily"— 7:00, 
8:00, 9:00 and 10:00 A.M. ; 12:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00 and 
10:30 p.m. " Sundays only "—11:00 a.m., and 1:30 p.:- 

From San Francisco to Ferxside.— " Daily, except 
Sundays"— 7:00, 9:00 and 10:00 A.M. ; 5:00 and 10:30 p.m. 

From Sax Fraxcisco to Brooklyn. — "Daily" — 7:30 
8:30 and 9:30 A.M.; 1:00,3:30,4:30,5:30, 0:30, 7:00, 8:10 
and 9:20 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—6:10, 11:00 A.M. 
and 11:45 r.M. "Sundays only" — i0:30, 11:30 a.m., and 
12:30 p.m. 

From Brooklyn to San Francisco. — "Daily" — 6:40. 
7:40, 8:40, 9:40 and 10:40 a.m.; 12:40,2:40,4:40,5:40, 6:40, 
7:50, 9:00 and 10:10 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—5:10 
and 5:50 a.m. "Sundays only" — 11:40 a.m., and 1:25 p.m. 

From Alameda to San Francisco.— " Daily "—7:00, 
8:03 and 9:00 A.M. ; 3:00, 3:58, 5:00, 6:03 and 7:00 p.m. 
"Daily, except Sundays "—5:00, 5:40, 11:30 a.m., and 1:30 
p.m. " Sundays only "--10:00, 11:00 A.M. ; 12:00 and 1:00 
P.M. 

From Ferxside to San Francisco.— "Daily, except 
Sundays "—6:55, 8:00 and 11:05 a:m. ; 3:55 and 6:05 p.m. 

From Oakland to San Francisco. — " Daily"— 6:50, 
7:20, 7:50, 8:25, S:50, 9:20,9:50, 10:50 and 11:50 A.M. ; 12:50, 
2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50, 0:30, 6:50, 7:20, 8:00, 
9:10 and 10:20 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—5:20, 6:00 
A. M., and 1:50 p.m. "Sundays only" — 10:20 and 11:20 
a.m. ; 12:20, 1:20 and 1:35 p.m. 

OVERLAND TICKET OFFICE, at New Ferry Land 
ing, foot of Market street. 

T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass and Ticket Agt. 

A. N. Towne, General Superintendent. 



ALFRED PARAF. 

Analytical ami Consulting Chemist. 
Assaying of all kinds of Ores, etc. Quantitative 
and Qualitative Analysis made at short notice. A 
Specialty made of Bleaching, Dyeing, and Printing of 
every description of Textile Fabrics and Yarns. Office — 
Boom 1, over London and San Francisco Bank, corner 
Leidesdorff and California streets. Laboratory— At 
Golden City Chemical Works, corner 7th and Towusend 
streets, San Francisco, California. Office Hours : Every 
day from 12 to 2 o'clock, where MR. PARAF is ready to 
negotiate for the sale of his numerous Patented Inven- 
tions. Balance of time at Laboratory. MR. ALFRED 
PARAF is a Pupil and Scientific Associate of Dr. Paul 
Schntzenberger, Professor of Chemistry and Chief of the 
Chemical Department of the College of France, Paris. 

REFERENCES (by permission) : Milton S. Latham, 
Manager London and San Francisco Bank (Limited) ; J. 
C. Duncan, Sec. Pioneer Land and Loan Association ; A. 
J. Bryant, Vice-President State Investment Insurance 
Company ; H. P. Wakelee, Manager Golden City Chemi- 
cal Works; W. F. McNutt, M.D. ; Dr. Charles F. Chan- 
dler, Dean of Columbia College Mining School, New 
York City ; Dr. Paul Schutzeuberger, College of France, 
Paris. Jan. 23. 



SOUTHERN FA0IFI0 BAILB0AD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION, 
WIXTER ARRANGEMENT. 

Commencing Sunday, December 26th, 
LB75, Passenger Trains will leave San Francisco, 
from Passenger Depot on Towusend street, between 
Third and Fourth streets, as follows : 

7 OO ASI - Cfoilj)) for Bernal, San Miguel, Colma, 
' •'-'" Baden and San Bruno. 

\M. (daily), for San Jose, Gilroy, Hollister, 
Tres Pinos, Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all 

Way Stations. Stage connections made with this train. 

XX A.M. (daily), for San Mateo and Way Sta- 
^^ tions. 



8.30 



11 



O tylX P.M. daily (Sundays excepted), for San Jose, 
k).±jO Gilroy and Way Stations. 



OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

TJ3 e^nlar Steamers to Portland, leaving: 

_EV San Francisco weekly— Steamers J. L. STEPHENS, 
ORIFLAMME, and AJAXi connecting with steamers to 
SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O. andC. R. R. Co. and 
Oregon C. R. R. Co. through Willamette, Umpqua, and 
Rogue River Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points on 
the O. and C. R. R. sold at reduced rates. Sailing Days : 
Saturdavsat 10 o'clock a. m. 
June 14. WM. NORMS, Agent, 210 Battery street. 



4.40 



P.M. (daily), for San Jose and Way Stations. 



Pi S ( \ P- M - (daily), for San Mateo and Way Stations. 

i£5T Extra Train on Sundays Discontinued. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent, San Francisco. 



LOS ANGEEES DIVISION*. 

Until connection is made between the Northern Divi- 
sion and Los Angeles Division, passengers fur points on 
the Los Angeles Division of the road will take the cars 
of the Central Pacific Railroad, via Oakland, at 4 P.M. 
daily for Tulare, Tipton, Delano, Poso, Lerdo, SuniDCT 
and Caliente ; thence by Telegraph Stage Line via Teha- 
chapi Pass to San Fernando (i»S miles only), and by 
Southern Pacific Railroad fur Los Amrdes, Coinptnn anil 
Wilmington ; for Florence, Downey, Norwalk, Costa and 
Anaheim— 100 miles from San Diego; and Eor San Ga- 
briel, Monte, Puente, Spadra, Cucauimiga, Cuiton, 
Mound City, San Gorgonia Summit and White Water, 
inaidiig connection at White Water with the stages Ol 
the Arizona and New Mexico Express Co. for Ehrenburg, 
Wickenherg, Pre.scott, Phoenix, Florence and Tucson. 
E. K. HEWITT, Superintendent, Los Angeles. 

J. L. WILLCUTT, Gen'l Passenger and Ticket Agent, 
San Francisco. Dec. 25. 



S. F. & N. P. R. R. AND STEAMERS. 

C^lhang-e of Time.— On anil after Mon- 
j day, November 15th, the steamer JAMES >L DoN- 
AMl'E, Captain W. Warner, trill leave Green-street 
wharf, daily (Sundays excepted), at 2::i0 o'clock P.M. ; 
connecting at Donahue Landing with cars for Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa, Fulton, Healdsburg, Litton's, Cloverdale and 
intermediate places. The train will leave Cloverdale 
daily (Sundays excepted), connecting with steamer at 
Donahue for San Francisco. No more Sunday trips un- 
til further notice. Close connections made with Stages 
on the arrival and departure of trains for Sonoma City, 
the Geysers, Skaggs, Mark West and Highland Springs. 
Also, Point Arena, Sebastopol, Bodega, Duncan's Mills, 
Fisk's Mills, Gualala, Clear Lake, Lakeport, t'kiah, Eure- 
ka, Mendocino, Pine Flat, Petrified Forest and Quicksilver 
mines. Freight received from 7 a.m. till 4 P.M. For all 
information, apply at General i Mlice, -1-2U Montgomery st. 
P. DONAHUE. President. 

F. H. GERDES, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

General Office : H2o Montgomery St., S. F. Sept. IS. 



JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION. 
[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

The attention of Sportsmen is invited 
to the following: Ammunition, of the best quality, 
now in general use throughout England, India and tie 
Colonies : Joyce's Treble Waterproof Central FirePercus- 
sion Caps; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wad- 
ding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Cartridges, fur Pin-fire and Cen- 
tral-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for kill- 
ing game at long distances, and even,- description i f 
Sporting Ammunition. Sold by all gunmakers and deal- 
ers in gunpowder. FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., 

Patentees and Manufacturers , 
Aug: 29. 57 Upper Thames street, Londor. 



REDUCTION OF RATES OF FREIGHT TO 
PORTLAND. 

Freig-nton Merchandise to Portland on 
Oregon Steamship Company's steamers REDUCED 
TWO DOLLARS PER TON until further notice.. 
May 29. WM. NORRIS, Agent 



TEETH SAVED! 

Fillies gr Teeth a MiH-eially Great prlieitce 
extended to children. Chloroform administered, 
and teeth skillfully extracted. After ten years constant 
practice, I can guarantee satisfaction. Prices moder- 
ate. Oftice— lit) Sutter street, above Montgomery. 
June 6. DR. MOF.FFEW, Dentist. 



O. MAIN. K. H. WINCHESTER. 

MAIN & WINCHESTER. 

MniinC'ciisifrsi and fmiiorlvrs of Ilarres*. 
Saddles, Bridles, Whips, Collars, Saddlery Ware, 
etc., Nos."3l-a and 2!*: Battery street, San Francisco. 
N. B. — A trood assortment of Concord Stage Harness 
constantly on hand. __ Sept. 12. 



JOSEPH CUBLE, 
Accountant, 

No. 513 illontsoiuei-y street, 
Sai> Fraiiciaeo. Cal. [Feb.' 



TAKE THE OLD LINE 

For Enreka. Humboldt Bay, arriving 
in twenty-four hours, only one night at sea. The 
staunch iron steamship PELICAN, SOOtons.Jas. Carroll 
Commander, will leave for the above ports, from Folsmn 
street wharf, on WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12, at Q o'clock A.M. 
BEN HOLLADAY. JUN., Agent, 
-May S. 123 California street. 



12, 1876.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



11 



NOTABILIA. 



The bull dog thai bmncUke tn ita 

■ 
; .iy while ;»)1 hands went t>» 
called in 
. n 
ipe, with the bio for him from the top qf tho 

. Jack< 
'. below Battery, there would have been ;» funeral < 

An exchange aaks : ** Wnal will mortify a young man of the period 
more tit m u> attempt u> remove uiaovai 

.: dickej 
man who buys bie clothes of the 

V»u 8 

First, I enta tit tike a glove, and \a-\, because they are 

ts money enough left to buy a doxen shirts into the 

Nothing is created in vain. ; beirusea. A lady who 

kept one <<i the curl] i nan cently lost her pet, and called upon 

■ ■ find it. The next ■ ■ eer came n itb the dog, which 

ry wet and dirty, l" ! ■ ■ ■■■. ■ overja ud ■ d I irty silly 

id ] m ino I : e dear baby V" ,: \\ hv, 

i»'-"*i". officer, " ;» man luul him tied to a pole, and wa 

Eng windows with him." 

" Youruj ladies have the privil anything they please dur- 

1 corners of her eyes with' 

a sweet look. Me said: "Anything, anything you ask, darling." "Wait 
till I Will you take a walk, and not hang around our houBe 

Iked. He walked down to George Hamlin's, 412 
Market rtre< t, and ordered another bottle of that delirious old whisky to 
brace iti> on. 

" You ain't afraid to die ?" Baid the cli rg] man tenderly. "No," re- 

plied the sufferer, " I'm only afraid if I do tliat the old woman will go 

. among my private papers the first thing." He didn't care about 

thai exquisite set ofjewelry that he pivrchaeed 

at ! >. W. Lairi icisco Jewelry Manufactory, corner Merchant 

and fifontgomery streets, and which sin: didn't get. 

The devotion of a young wife to her newly married husband is very 

touching. In ] at this blissful early period, be does not even look 

in carpet slippers. His snoring may be a more painful surprise 

than Bhe would choose to admit ; but she refrains from mentioning it— for 

T tWO. 

A blacksmith of Maryland sets an example to the country, offering 
to do ."ml w ork " for cash, or no cash if a person has a good countenance, 
for 1 have no Sally to smld. no children to squall, drinks no whisky, pays 
no rent, and !;■■>■;,- l.nch- duns hall." The best cash investment we know of 



is one of the unapproachable Hall & Davis 1 Pianos, at Wm. G. 
Nil 13 Sansome Btreet. 



Bade 



A baby was found in a basket, Thursday, with this placard pinned to 
its clothes : " To bhe finder — This is your child."' It strikes us that this is 
rather sweeping ; too general, as it were. You can't expect to convince 
any nne in that way. Everybody is convinced, however, that the best, 
cheapest and must stylish harness to be found in the city is made by Main 
& Winchester, No. 214 Battery street. 



"Piety," remarked an Arkansas preacher to his congregation the other 
day, " dues not consist in noise. The Lord can see you give to the needy 
just as easily as he can hear you pray the roof off." 

"Exploring waist places," said John Henry, as he put his arm around 
the pretty chambermaid. "Navigation of the 'air," said Mrs. Henry, 
overhearing him, and sailing into his raven curls. Fortunately he had just 
had his photograph taken by Bradley & Rulofson, so that the loss of his 
hyperion curls didn't matter so much. See B. & K.'s wonderful new con- 
vex cards. 

" Ann," observed a housekeeper to the hired girl, the other morning, "as 
we have entered upon the dawn of another century of our nation's history, 
I guess you had better get a tooth-brush of your own." Everybody ought 
to start the Centennial right by resolving to use no other wines or liquors 
than the perfectly pure ones sold by F. & P, J. Cassin, No. 523 Front 
street. 

Scene in Court : — Judge : " Have you anything to offer to the Court 
before sentence is passed on you?" Prisoner: "No, judge; I had ten 
dollars, but my lawyers took that." 

The Chicago Tribune says that a million Americans eat with their 
knives. That is so, and if this Chinese immigration don't cease, there will 
be a few more million who will be glad to eat with anything. The best 
place in the city to eat with real satisfaction isat Emerson C'orvibVs Saddle 
Rock Oyster Saloon, Pine street, above Montgomery. 

There is a man in Oakland so close that when he attends church he 
occupies the pew farthest from the pulpit to save the interest on his money 
while the collectors are passing around the plates for contributions. He 
buys all his furniture at N. P. Cole's because he finds there the best arti- 
cles twenty-five per cent, cheaper than elsewhere. 



Miss Eastman, of Boston, speaks of " eyes as bright as buttons on an 
angel's underclothing." 

Remember that the ladies have a right this year to take you to a dance, 
to buy the oysters, treat to the cigars, button your gloves, fasten your par- 
lor skates, and other little things you have heretofore considered as exclu- 
sive privileges of your own. They have even a right to send you a basket 
of wine from A. P. Hotaling, 431 Jacks-on strest. 



Throat Affections and Hoarseness. — All suffering from Irritation of 

the Throat and Hoarseness will be agreeably surprised at the almost imme- 
diate relief afforded by the use of " Brown's Bronchial Troches." 



Baour-Ijormi in, 

: having received nthbl 

■ 

■ 
■ 
'Yea, sire, ■■ plied the man. '0 1, I the tyrant. If ] 

"' '■'"' "" \l. too. don't 

kn<<\\ bin 

One of the most pitiable sights in this life i^ the spectacle of a man 

■I but three nth- e 

■ ! tohear him i onver. e with the bal rack for fifteen min- 
■ min tip-stairs at night The happy marri d man ticks to 
Napa So la. 

•■ Astonishing cure lor consumption," as the old lady said whi d he 
sprinkled snnfl on the victual, oi hi r boarders. Nothing will stop the in 

consumption of the delicioue lunch I ippei ervedal the fa 

Criterion, No. 210 Kearny street. 

Mr. Edward Spencer haB written a five act tragedy called Mm 
for Mr. di.hu Me' illoi Heaven forgive him I it'- enough to make a 

pair of Muller'a Brazilian Pebble Spectacles weep. Muller'e [dace is just 
opp< ite the Occidental. 



A FEW OF THE MEKBEBS OF 
THE S. F. STOCK AND EX- 
CHANGE BOARD. 

COLL nilAXK President. 

C. »'. Hoxi.xci: - - VUje-Pres't. 
II. s ci: M i EJOJE l.l.-- Treasurer. 

J<\ LA WTON Secretary. 

Ji. II. COIT - Chairman. 

Austin, Alexander 

Budd, W. C 4JU California st. 

Burling &Bro 828 California at. 

Boswell, S. B 30? California et. 

Cahill, E 401) Montgomery et. 

Charles, H. A 408 Montgomery st. 

Cope, tlhler &Co Montgomery st 

CollDeane No. 16, Nevada Block. 

Eyre, E E 31 1 Montgomery st. 

Glover, G. F. M 480 California pt. 

Greenebaum, J 413 California et. 

Hassey, F. A 402 Montgomery et. 

Hart, Henry 412 Montgomery st. 

Hall, Ed. F 410 California st. 

Herr, J. J 411 California st. 

Hooker, R. C 426 Montgomery st. 

Jones, J.H 509 California st. 

Keene, J. R 435 California et. 

King 1 , Jos. L 406H; California st. 

Lynch, J HO Leidcsdorff st. 

Latham, Jas.H 411 California st. 

Marina, E. J. De S., with I. Glazier 

& Co 426 Montgomery st. 

Noble, H. H 435 California et. 

Peckham, E. P 413 California st. 

Parker, W. C 112 Leideadorff et. 

Perry, Jr., Jno 106 Leidesdorff st. 

Shawhan, J. E 432 Montg'y st. 

Sherwood, B. F 406& California et. 

Schmieden, Eoehstadter & Co 

401 California st, 

-miley, G. W 444 California st. 

Shotwell, J, M 311 Montgomery st. 

Turnbull, W 410& California bI. 

"Wakefield, S B 503 California st. 



A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF 

THE PACIFIC STC«K EX- 

CHANGE BOARD. 

E. .T. HALDWix President. 

GEO. S. TfOUCE - - Vice-PrcB't. 

<l. C. mCCKQX Treasurer. 

A. ,T. MOULDER Secretary. 

JOS. TILDES Ch airman. 

Baldridge, M 

8arton, Robert 

Berry, F. G 418 Montgomery st. 

Bourne, J. B 116 Halleck st. 

DeGreayer, S 308 Sansome st. 

Dodge, George S 

Finlaysou, J. R Pacific Exchange 

Building, Halleck street. 

Hickox, A. A Ilalleck'B Building. 

Hearst, George 

Hoight, IraG 421 Montgomery st. 

Hunt, J. L 306 Sansome st. 

Lent, "William M 

Marks, Joseph 

Mauldin, Hugh 

Moulder, A. J 

Martin, M. S 307 California st. 

McCoppin, F 326 Montgomery st. 

Moroney, Paul 8 Halleck et. 

Nash, J 405J$ California st. 

Neal, iharles S 

Palmer, E. F 413 California st. 

Plummer, H. W 

Riolte, E. N 

Rich. Dave 422 Montgomery st. 

Sanborn, T. G 

Sutro, Gustave 

Swift, Frank 

Smiley, T.J. L 314 Montgomery st. 

Scofield, D. G 315 California et- 

Taylor, A. C... -411ft Cal'a at, room 2. 

Tyng, Geo 309 Cal'aBt., rooms 8-9. 

Van N ess, Thomas C 

Willard, G H 309 California st. 

Walker, J. V/. & Co... .303 Montg'y et. 



A CARD. 

The Pacific .Tockey Club return Shanks to tiicir fellow-citi- 
zens and the public for the very liberal support given to their efiorts to bring 
to this State a large number of the best thoroughbred horses. In evidence of their 
success, it is only necessary to read the names of the stars now here. Such a splendid 
field of horses the world has never seen. The benefit to the State and city derived 
from these annual exhibitions is well understood by every intelligent person. The 
mammoth purses given by California has obtained a world-wide celebrity, and the in- 
terest in the approaching event was never equaled in the annals of the turf. The suc- 
cess of this enterprise is something of which every citizen may justly feel proud. 
The Club, on behalf of their fellow-citizens, extend a cordial welcome to those gentle- 
men who have brought their horses and retinue of attendants thousands of miles, at 
an expense of over $20,000, to take part in the " Carnival," and speak for them a 
" fair field " and no favor, and may the best horse win. A. J. BHYANT, Pres. 
John Maktix, .Secretary. November 0. 

F. C. Snow.] SNOW & MAY'S AKT GALLEBY. [W.B.Mat 

SSOW A MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OP 

Pictures, Frames, Moldings, and Artists* Materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 

CUTTER WHISKY. 

A I*. Hotaliiisr A Co.. No. 131 Jaekson street, are the Sole 
* Agents on this Coast for tbe celebrated J. H. CUTTER WHISKY, shipped di- 
rect to them from Louisville, Kentucky, The Trade are cautioned against the pur- 
chase of inferior and imitation brands of "J. H. Cutter Old Bourbon." Owing to 
its deserved reputation, various unprincipled parties are endeavoring to palm off 
spurious grades. It is really the Best Whisky in the United State s. March _19.__ 

E03ERT GEPRGE Accountant, 

Room 1, Sherman's Building, 80S Montgomery street. [July 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 12, 1876. 



"A FAINTED FAN." 

Roses and butterflies snared on a fan, 

All that is left of a summer gone by; 
Of swift, bright wings that flashed in the sun, 

And loveliest blossoms that bloomed to die ! 
By what subtlest spell did you lure them here, 

Fixing a beauty that will not change; 
Roses whose petals never will fall, 

Bright, swift wings that never will range 1 
Had you owned but the skill to snare as well 

The swift-winged hours that came and went, 
To prison the words that in music died, 

And fix with a spell the heart's content, 
Then had you been of magicians the chief ; 

And loved and lovers should bless your art, 
If you could but have painted the soul of the thing, 

Not the rose alone, but the rose's heart. 
Flown are those days with their winged delights, 

As the odor is gone from the summer rose ; 
Yet st 11, whenever I wave my fan, 

The soft, south wind of memory blows. 



MONETARY AFFAIRS. 
The silver coin question appears to be the all-absorbing topic at pres- 
ent in financial as well as commercial circles. City traders and jobbers 
generally %ave applied their only remedy — which is to mark prices for 
goods at silver rates, and, if paid in gold coin, make a proper discount. The 
press of the city publishes the following as the amount of silver coin and 
Trade Dollai's held by the banks of this city on Saturday, February 5th, 
and on the same date last year : 

, 1876 , , 1875 . 

NAME OF BANK. Silver Coin. Trade Dollar. Silver Coin. 



California $ 65,000 

Nevada 78,000 

Merchants' Exchange 36,000 

London and San Francisco 220,000 

Anglo-Californian 101,000 

San Francisco 5,013 

Pacific 33,210 

British Columbia 20,650 

British North America 21,700 

Swiss American 7,150 

Pioneer S. and D 3,500 

Hibernia 100 

Odd Fellows' , 500 

California Sav. and Loan Society. 55 

Davidson & Co.'s 10,000 

Wells, Fargo & Co. 's 23,000 

Borel & Co.'s 8,500 

Farmers' and Mechanics' 19,571 

L. Belloc's 20,000 

Land Mortgage Union 1,000 

San Francisco Savings Union .... 2,000 

Exchange 2,500 

*♦** 50,000 

Hickox & Spear 10,000 

Sather & Co ... ' 85,000 

Grangers' 13,000 

German Savings 6,200 

Donohoe, Kelly & Co 42,188 

Humboldt Savings and Loan. . . . 15,700 

Dime Savings 6,200 

Western Savings and Trust Co. . 5,681 

French Savings 3,289 

Savings and Loan Society. 1,700 

Masonic Savings 1,400 

Market-street Savings 1,000 



25,000 
24,000 
30,000 

i^ooo 

6,000 



100 
1,000 



246 

' 18,500 

'2,666 
2,000 



1,500 

' ' 400 

' '366 

' ' 425 
200 
300 



§129,000 



Totals 8914,608 

Add Silver Coin 



$115,471 
914,608 



34,000 
65,000 
29,000 

4,851 
10,820 

1,500 
13,540 

3,000 

15,250 

150 

487 

285 

1,900 
24,036 

4,500 
13,771 
12,000 

i',666 



20,000 
4,500 
3,000 

16,172 
1.700 

' '1,606 
1,908 

' '1,666 



8414,370 



Totals of Silver 81,030,079 

Total in 1875 414,370 



Increase . 



8414,370 



8615,709 



The figures for 1876 do not represent the stock of silver coin in the city 
which may be estimated at 82,000,000 at least, including 35,547 Trade 
Dollars in the hands of brokers, private citizens, and Chinese merchants ; 
but it is quite sufficient to show that silver has accumulated in this city to 
an unusual extent as compared with the same time last year. The quan- 
tity in the banks has more than doubled. 

Money is in abundant supply for all practical business purposes, and at 
rates long ruling in the open market. 

Treasure exports per British steamer City of Melbourne, hence Feb- 
ruary 4th: 

TO HONOLULU. 

J. C. Merrill & Co., Mexican dollars 86,000 

The shipments of gold coin overland, by express, since January 1st, 
1876, have been as follows : -» 

January 1st to January 6th 8305,800 

January 6th to January 13th 360,000 

January 13th to January 20th 341,767 

January 20th to January 27th 153,302 

January 27th to February 3d 130,000 

February 3d to February 10th 45,600 



Total 81,336,169 

Same period, 1875 •. 1,424,872 

Decrease this year 888,703 



The official exports of treasure from January 1st to date have been as 
follows : 



February 1st to February 10th— Overland to New York. .... 8320,433 06 

February 1st — Per Great Republic to China 147,446 00 

February 4tD — Per City of Melbourne to Honolulu 6,000 00 



Total since February 1st S 473,879 06 

Previously this year 2,392,197 64 



Total since January 1st, 1876 82,866,076 7fl 

Corresponding period, 1875 3,587,487 32 



Decrease this year 8 721,410 62 

The above table does not include the amounts of treasure sent through 
the United States mails. 

The duties paid at the Custom House in this city, from February 2d to 
date have been as follows : 

February 2d 834,812 70 

February 3d 37,769 30 

February 4th , 29,129 41 

February 5th 18,247 10 

February 7th 25,738 32 

February 8th 9,209 06 

Previously in February 32,216 49 

In February S1S7.102 38 

In January 579,390 85 

Total since January 1st, 1876 8766,493 23 

Corresponding period, 1875 666,948 44 



Increase this year 

The receipts and disbursements of the United States 
urer in this city for the month of January, 1875-6, were 

RECEIPTS. 

1875. 

Customs 8532,020 31 

Internal Revenue Tax 313,018 70 

Internal Revenue Stamps 10,240 00 

Sales of Land 57,780 66 

Patent Fees 590 00 

Post-office Department 48,457 91 

Disbursing Officers 1,336,393 01 

Transfers 

Various sources 81,513 29 



Total receipts 82,380,013 88 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Treasury Drafts 8870,468 12 

Post-office Department Drafts 9,324 23 

Disbursing Officers' Checks 1,092,091 72 

Transfers 507,499 87 

Public Debt 6,906 00 



899,544 79 

Assistant Treas- 
as follows : 

•1876. 

8596,568 81 

393,172 86 

13,958 08 

44,272 20 

767 00 

37,523 50 

1,454,976 42 

500,000 00 

127,179 99 

83,168,418 86 

$712,425 09 

8,810 40 

1,397,789 10 

500,000 00 

5,275 87 

Total Disburseme nts 82,486,289 94 82,624,300 46 

THE MINDEIiEFF PROCESS. 

The satisfactory organization of the Mindeleff Reduction Com- 
pany and the vigorous steps it is quietly taking for the development of its 
gigantic scheme, induce us to express our renewed confidence in its suc- 
cess and in its value to the mining community at large. Of all processes 
which have from time to time promised a satisfactory working of our 
copper deposits and of our more refractory gold and silver ores, none have 
impressed us more favorably than the Mindeleff method, under which 
the Company is operating. We feel warranted in this opinion by the 
effectiveness and economy which it bears upon its very face. The rare 
scientific attainments of the inventor as a practical chemist and metallur- 
gist bar the supposition that he deceives himself as to the value of his 
process, while the high personal and professional character of his associ- 
ates assure us that no crude or impractical invention would receive their 
sanction. More than this, there is no feature, whether of the patent or of 
the machinery in which this is applied, which is not thrown unreservedly 
open to the examination of experts. The fundamental principles of both 
are axiomatic in the opinion of truly educated scientists, which fact, in 
connection with complete demonstrations made in this city with appa- 
ratus of working size, and with the favorable report recently published in 
our columns, points inevitably to the conclusion that we have at last 
reached a mode by which the rebellious silver and gold ores may be 
economically worked. As Professor Mindeleff undoubtedly brings all 
metals contained in the ore to the metalic state, their final reclamation, 
whether by amalgamation or by smelting, becomes simple and involves 
the least possible loss. 

" Punch'3 " Gifts For the New Year. — To the Prince of Wales (on 
the arrival of H. R. H. from India). — A hearty welcome. To the Prince 
of Wales (on the arrival of H. R. H. from Denmark). — A bouquet of 
heart's-ease, and a little lecture upon the unkindness of going away. To 
the Emperor of Russia. — A map of Asia, with the British boundaries 
plainly marked. To the Emperor of Germany. — A view of England, 
with the British arms and the motto " Nemo me impune lacensit." To 
Prince Von Bismarck. — An easy chair. To Marshal MacMahon. — A 
new history of Egypt. To the Sultan. — The independence of the Khedive. 
To the Khedive. — The protection of England. To the King of Spain. — 
An illuminated copy of Dr. Watts' hymn, " Let dogs delight to bark and 
bite." To the Lords of the Admiralty. — A little retirement. To Sir 
John Karslake. — A well-merited peerage. To the Representatives of cer- 
tain American Republics. — Apartments next door to an " unhappy noble- 
man." To Mr. Toby. — The compliments of the season. And to the rest 
of the world. — A new volume of Punch. 

St. John's Presbyterian Church, Post Street, between Mason and 
Taylor. — The Rev. Dr. Scott continues his Sunday evening lectures upon 
the Catacombs of Rome to increased audiences. He will also preach at 
11 A. M. ; evening services 7^ P. M. The public cordially invited. 

The long-talked-of pigeon match between Messrs. Robinson and 
Eyre romes off at Alameda Point to-morrow. The conditions are 16 
single birds at 21 yards, and 8 pair of double at 18 yards, for 8100 a side. 



Feb. 19, i 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 



13 



CRADLE. ALTAR. AND TOMB. 



CRADLE. 
Johnaon-ln llit«cltr. rVSnun Ttb. to Ihv vrlfo Of T, 11 JobDMO. « ton. 
L.i.ihy 

!■- tin- wife ol int.. L moke. 

BamUeU 111 tli|., in, K. l.niii, Tit.. I,. Ilu' Wife .'I .hi in- ^ .1 I., A iluu^lihT. 

FelMiell In ti i k .on. 

-'.(.. tin VMf. |1 . .1,(1. 

Forr.-at In ' ■ . '.i I!,, v. !,■ ..I'll I. i liUT. 

Doyle 1 1, 'i - [hler. 

To tjeii In ■.'. , ..,,, 

Cohoreieh In tills city, Pcbrnarj mil. t.. Hi. wife of Joaoph Cobnrelcb, a son. 
Dfcoto AtD , to tbe wife of Ssm Oecoto, a ton. 

Meyt-i .wife ..i A. L. Meyer, a. daughter. 

ALTAB. 

Codtnirton-Crosby In Ihl u. w. II. Codington to s. .1. Crosby. 

Bruial-LiDbschutz In lhi„ city. Fab, r,lli BlDOD Ilrniiil In Undid LlebaChnU. 

TOMB. 
Greenbaum— In thl. city, February Bib, Joaeph Grerabanin, aged US veiir*. 
O'Leary In tb iry 7ih. Michael J. O'Leary, aged 11 montita. 

Olseu-iiit; w. olsen. aged 11 montba. 

Dohin Intl no, Mary Dolan. aged 85 yeara. 

Duffy -In iblaciiy, K.-iTn .rv 7th, Catherine I only, aged 70 years, 

Connor- In flu- . i:. . Pebroar) ,.|i, Kate or. aged 25 years. 

Bradley In Ihleclly. Pehrnury sin, Jennie Bradley. aged 19 yeara, 
Gmhn in ih - city, Pebruai y Bin, Peter a Or ffln, agi d 20 jreara. 

Graves— In Utla City, February Bib. Polly I! Qmvca, ueeil ~? years. 

Honnore In ibla rity, i . i.r.i iry mh, Laeroal Bonnore, aged .".', years. 
McAleer In tblaclty, February Btb, Francis McAleer, aged 88yeara. 



aj— 

OUR EXPORT TRADE. 
The Bulletin baa recently been figuring out our export trade for a 
aeriea ,.f years, ami gives the following from official sources : 



ISI^-.VI 

1861 

1 152 
1863 
1854 
1855 
1858 
1857 
1858 
1859 
lsi 111 
1861 
1862 
18U3 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1K71 
18T2 

is?:! 
1S74 
1875 



Merchandise. 

m'.imiO.OOO 

1.1)1)0.000 

l.WO.OOO 

L'. OO0.000 

L'.oW.WK) 

4,189,600 

4,270,500 

4,:«»,800 

4. 7 7i i. •-'in i 

5,533,400 

8,532,400 

9,886,100 

iii,.-ii',.-,.:;iiii 

1M.S77.4O0 

13,271.«00 

14,554,100 

17,281,700 

22,421,300 

22,844,200 

20,846,300 

17,700,700 

13,932,300 

23,698,600 

30,340,800 

27,441,000 

20,018,000 



Treasure. 
(66,000,000 

4.i.0,S!).lll)0 
47,. 7751,000 
54,965,000 
52,045,600 
4.-1,101,700 
B0, l '.07, 400 
48,976,700 
47.:,4s.ill)l) 
47,640,500 
42,325,900 
40,676,800 
42,r.i;i,soo 

40,071,900 
50,707,200 
44,420.200 
44,365,700 
40,071,800 
30,358,100 
37,287,100 
32,983,100 
17,253.300 
29,330,400 
24,641,000 
30,170,600 
42,924,000 



Total. 

(68,000,000 

46,989,000 

47.279.llDl) 
56,965,000 
54,545,600 
49,351,300 
54,967,900 
53,346,500 
52.318,200 
53,173,900 
50,858,300 
50.564,900 
53.127,100 
50,949,300 
63,979,000 
58,980,300 
61.647,400 
63,093,100 
59,202,300 
58,133,400 
50,752,800 
31,245,600 
53,029,000 
54,981,800 
57,612,200 
72,542,900 



Totals, $329,078,000 Sl,107,557,800 $1,436,635,800 
We annex the quantities of through freight sent East by rail during the 
past five years : 

San Francisco. Interior. Total, 

1871, lbs, 57,796,000 6,509,000 64,305,000 

1872 57,759,000 7,525,000 65,284,000 

1873 63,696,000 8,754,000 72,450,000 

1874 121,855,000 20,144,000 141,999.000 

1875 94,465,000 12,492,000 106,957,000 

The average capacity of a car is 20,000 lbs, though if the freight be very 
bulky it will fall considerably short of this amount. At this rate there 
were over 3,200 cars dispatched hence with freight in 1871 and 1872, equal 
to a train of cars for each secular day in the year. Iu 1873 there were 3,622 
car loads of freight sent East. The volume of business was exceptionally 
large in 1874, when double the number of cars of 1873 was sent, namely, 
7,100, equal to a train of twenty cars for 355 days of the year. The 
reason of this was the unusually heavy shipments of barley. Last year 
the number was reduced to 5,348 cars. The result shows that in five 
years we have sent 22,550 cars of freight to the East. 

The Bulletin in this connection makes one very important statement, 
which is that during the last six years we shipped Eastward through the 
mails — say from September, 1869, to January 1, 1876, as follows : 

Gold Coin, 828,180,000 i Cold Bars, §450,000 

Total, $28,630,000 

If we now add the railroad shipments of merchandise and produce and 
the mad shipments of treasure to the total given in the first table, we 
have the following as the result of our export. trade for the past twenty- 
nine years : 

Merchandise by water, $329,078,000 

Merchandise by rail, 50,000,000 

Treasure through mercantile channels, 1,107,557,800 

Treasure through mails, 28,630,000 



Total, 



$1,515,265,800 

These figures are astounding, and it will be hard to make John Bull 
believe that the Government mails have actually carried Gold Coin to 
the extent of $28,630,000 ; nevertheless this is true, and of course is at 
the time carried clandestinely, and oftentimes is puzzling to our people to 
know where the Gold Coin of the country has disappeared to. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOH WEEK ENDING FEB 




\llii. - 

A!]- 



All i 

!ii Flat .. 

Boloher 

Bosl & Belcher .. 

Bola i 

ore 

Bullion 

Chern Creek . - 
i iron n Point 

Challenge 

I iholl a 

i loniet 

Coil. Virginia. . .. 

' laUforma 

i' dedonla 

Cosmopolitan . .. 

i lose I ton. 

Confidence 

Condi r 

< labinet 

Daytonj 

Defiance 

Empire Mill 

Eureka (-'on . a . . 

Bxche |uer 

Eldorado South . 

Eclipse 

Edinburgh 

Guxopa 

East i iphir 

Globe 

Gould & Curry . . 

Qlencoe Con 

CM Hun 

Gila 

'Golden Chariot. 

Glasgow 

Hale & Norcross. 

I-Iussey 

Imperial 

International . . . 

Ida Elmore 

Jackson 

Justice 

Jefferson 

Julia 

Jenny Glynn 

Knickerbocker'.. 

Kentuck 

K. K.C'on 

Kossuth 

Kelsey 

Lady Bryan 

Leopard 

Leo 

Lady Wash'n.. . 

Leviathan 

Mexican 

Monumental 

"Meadow Valley. 

Mides 

Miller 

"Mint 

Mansfield 

Marks & Darrow. 

*New York 

Nevada 

* North Carson .. 

Niagara 

*NewCoso 

Northern Belle . . 

Newark 

Ophir 

Overman 

Original Gold Hill 

Occidental 

Pioneer 

'Pinehe.'. 

Prospect 

"Pacific 

Poomian 

Phil Sheridan . .. 

• Prussian 

Panther 

Rye Patch 

Rock Island 

Raymond & Ely. 
Seg. Caledonia". . 
South Calif oniia 

"•Savage 

Sierra Nevada... 
Seg. Belcher .... 

Silver Hill 

South Silver Hill 

'Succor 

South Chariot. . . 

Safe Deposit 

Union Con 

Utah 

"Woodville 

West Comstock 

Wells Fargo 

West Belcher... 
Yellow Jacket.. 



19* 



123 



2i 
04 

422 

*:;\ 
34 

IS 

i0i 

"A 

121 

i 



12J 



11.1 



27i 



21; 



103 



loll 



21 



97 



2CH 



14J 



wo 



12J 



ni 



27} 
14J 



101 



11} 



The Stocks above marked thus * are Assessed. 



10 



2* 
i 



14} 



12J 



U 

4 
i 
i 
li 



22 

18j 
12 



I i 

2i 
10411 _ 



Senator Sharon better represents the Pacific Coast than any law- 
maker that ever left it. He is followed to the Senate by the unfeigned 
respect and gratitude of our entire community, irrespective of party. 



14 



SAN T FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 12, 1876. 



SPECEAL BREVITIES. 



Those persons who have seen the Lord Mayor of London — not merely 
in his nuwt festive garb, but in semi-state— will not have fa led to notice 
that the chief magistrate wears at such times a large oval ornament, htm;* 
round his neck by a piece of Garter-blue ribbon. This ornament is com- 
posed of large diamonds ; it is of great value, and has a history extending 
over ai imethuig like 800 years, the age of the Corporation. Shortly after the 
present Lord Mayor came into office, one of the enormous brilliants in the 
"jewel" — for that is its proper appellation — was missed. It had either 
fallen out. or been stolen, and search was made for it high and low. The 
Mansion House was presumably closely looked over, but unsuccessfully, 
and a West-end jeweler was called in to provide a substitute for the lost 
diamond, the actual Worth of which was very great, while its historical 
value might hardly be appraised. One day, however {we learn from the 
World), as the Lord Mayor was reading in one of the drawing-roonis 
at the Mansion House, a gleam of sunshine fell upon something lying near 
a couch, and when Mr. Cotton went to look, he found th. n .t that son* 
Was the missing diamond, which now gleams as brightly as ever it did in 
the "jewel." 

The old Oriental trait of lavish generosity has now left the Easterns. 
A certain M. Bavray obtained a grant of land from the Khedive of Egypt 
to build a house. The building finished, M." Bavray invited the Khedive 
to come and see it, and the latter, delighted, asks how much did it cost. 
*• £50,000," was the reply. "Here are £60.000/' said the Khedive, "let 
me buy it." The offer was accepted, and 31. Bavray was commissioned to 
fit up and furnish it, which he did at a cost of some £'120.000. When all 
was finished M. Bavray went to see the Khedive, taking his little son 
with him. The Khedive approached the child to kiss him, but the boy 
ran away, crying out " 2s o, no. Mamma says you are a naughty man."' 
" Why?" exclaimed the astonished Khedive. " Because you feave taken 
our cn'untrv house," sobbed the infant. M. Bavray, of course, apologized 
and scolded the child, but on taking leave the Khedive wrote a few lines 
on a piece of paper, and gave it to the child for his mother, Baying, " You 
can kiss me now, little man. I am no longer naughty. " The piece of 
paper was a deed of gift of the whole property. 

The following was part of a young attorney's peroration on argument 
of demurrer in one of the Denver courts recently : " May it pleased your 
honor this is a stupendous question. Its decision by you, this day, will 
live in judicial history long after yon and I shall have passed from this 
scene of earthly glory and sublunary vanity ; when the tower of Pisa 
shall be forgotten ; when Waterloo and Borodino shall grow dim in the dis- 
tant cycles of receding centuries ; when the name of Eugene, Marlborough, 
and Napoleon are no longer remembered ; when the pyramids of the 
Pharaohs shall have crumbled into dust ; when the hyppopotamus shall 
cease to inhabit its native Xile ; even then your ruling upon this demurrer 
will still survive in the antique volumes of legal lore as fresh, green, and 
imperishable. The case, your honor, originally concerns the cost of two 
new hats and an umbrella." 

It is reported that negotiations are in progress between a powerful 
Liverpool organization and the trustees of Lord Bute for the re-establish- 
ment of the connection between Cardiff and New York. The proposition 
is to put on at once three steamers of the company in question, which 
will make the passage in about fourteen days, and start regularly from 
each side of the Atlantic every fortnight. These steamers will not take 
passengers, but will be entirely devoted to the carrying of cargo. It is 
stated that the company does not seek any concessions further than some 
modification of the dock dues. 

At the Iiincolnshire (England* Petty Sessions the Rev. E. W. L. 
Tollemache, rector of Witham, and his son, Granville X'ollemache, were 
charged with unlawfully and maliciously shooting a foxhound belonging 
to Lord Lonsdale. The rector last year claimed compensation from Lord 
Lonsdale, as master of the Cottsmore Hounds, for alleged damage done 
by foxes to bis sheep, but his claims were disallowed. On December 3d a 
foxhound ran across the rector's field, and young Mr. Tollemache shot it 
from the billiard-room. Father and son were fined £5 each, £1 as dam- 
ages, and the costs. 

The public libraries of the United States are over seventy in num- 
ber. The Congress Library is the largest, and contains 261,000* volumes, 
Boston Public Library possesses nearly as many, and increases at the rate 
of 15,000 volumes per annum, Harvard College comes next with 200,000, 
and the Astor and the Mercantile of New York have 148,000 each. Nine 
liliraries possess more than 100,000 ; and seventeen more than 35,000, and 
less than 50.000. 

A Ceylon correspondent writes to us from Kandy, that the poles 
supporting the triumphal arches which lined the Prince's route were con- 
nected crossways by a beautiful species of fern moss, called by the Cinga- 
lese the " Goldsmith Destruction." The reason for this singular name is 
that one of the Kandyan kings commanded the goldsmiths to imitate this 
delicate moss in silver. They, failing miserably, had their heads cut off. 

The Montenegrin Loan is stated to be an accomplished fact. Prince 
Nikita has ordered 10,000 rifles and 60 cannon in America, to be delivered 
in March. In consequence of the threatening attitude by Turkey, the 
Montenegrin Guards, a body of 3,000 men, all armed with breechloaders 
and revolvers, have been sent to the frontier. 

The " Pehin Gazette " has been established over one thousand years, 
and probably its present nurcbers are exact counterparts of the first it is- 
sued. It covers ten pages, 4x8 inches, and has a yellow cover on which 
its name is printed. It is the only native paper circulating in a kingdom of 
414,000,000 souls, and is exclusively confined to official notices. 

Governor Tilden of New York says : In 1S50 the whole amount of 
national, State, and municipal taxes collected from the people of the 
United Stat - waa 883,00 1,000. In I860 it rose to 8154,000,000, and in 1870 
it was 8730,000,000. In 1850 the tax per head was S3 57. In I860, $4 80, 
and in I 

It is stated that Thomas or Thomassen, the man who is believed to 
have caused the Bremerhafen explosion, tried unsuccessfully to insure a 
lii. last year, which he said contained £6,000 in specie. The box has now 
been opened by the American police, and was found to contain commcn 

shot. 

Mr. Longfellow has declined the post of poet in connection with the 
ntennial Exhibition. 



BROKERS. 



SA.MU"! McKEE & CO. 

Slock Brokers mi 1 dealers in Stock Privileges. 324 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. We transact a general Stock 
Buy and Sell Stocks for cash or onamaryin, making cash advanf 
We make I Stock Privileges. Our business has assumed such proportions 

that we are compelled to remove from "ur late office to the large office, No. 3S4 Mont- 
gomery street (S 'nipany's Building). Our Brokers are DR. C. W. POX 
and (.'HAS. N. NilAL. Members of the San Francisco Stock 2nd Exchange 

: The Nevada Bank of San Francisco. Our Weekly Circular, containing the 
highest and lowest prices of active Stocks for each day for the past thirty days, with 
a Pamphlet; explaining Stock Privileges, Bent free to any address No. 334 Hontgom- 
ery street. S. F. « ntice at Viiyinia City, in Weils, Fargo &. Co.'s building. Jan . 20. 

D. G. SC1FTELD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers, bay and sell all stocks, ami 
carry sameon margin our Mr. Scofield, late of and for many years the junior 
member of the well known mercantile firm of F. B. TAYLOR & CO., will give his 
exclusive attention to filling all orders.. Rooms C and 7, No. 315 Califonii " 
San Francisco. Feb. 5. 



SrescEE C. Brown k. 



Get. G. R. Versos 



S 



J. J. Tobis. 
VEBNON, TOSIH & CO., 
Brokers, Montgomery street, next Deposit fo.'s 



lock 

Vaults, San Fnu 



St wk Exchange. 



Feb. 5. 



W. St-Urley.) 



SIAIRLtY & HA72BSTICK, [W. H. Ravi 



Stock and Money Brokers, 410 1-2 California street. Orders 
received for purchase and sale of mining- stocks. ^ Feb. ,s. 

R2&07AL! 

JW. Brown A- Co.. Stock and Money Brokers, have re- 
» moved to Xo. 317 Montgomery street, Nevada Block, f 
J. W. Brows, Mem. S. F. Stock and Cxch. Board. [Jan. 8.) Geo. S. Bbowh 

K0TIC3 CF REMOVAL. 

Fry, Nenl A- Co., Commission Stock Brokers, nave removed 
330 Montgomery street, Safe Deposit Building. 
Ciias. S. Neal. Me mber S. V. Stock & Exch. Board. [Jan. -29.] E. M. Fry. 

Albert A. Hicsoz. Thomas Steel. H. G. Kvul. 

KVIIL. STEEL A3fl> HICEOX, 

Stcck Brokers, 332 Sansorne Street, San Francisco. California. [10-2. 

JAMES H. L&THAM & CO., 

Stock an<l Money Brokers, 411 California street, San Frar_- 
tfember s. F. Stock and Exchange Board, Money loaned on Stocks. 
Stocks bought and carried on margins. Jan. 8. 

Sherwood Callaghan.] NOTICE OF BE 7 * OVAL. [Jeremiah LTNcn. 

Ciallaziiati. Lynch A- Co. have remo ved to No. 106 Lefties (torn* 
j street, near corner o: Haileck. Jan. s. 

JOHN G. AYBES, 

Late of Ay res. Cope A- Co., will negotiate loans, anil buy and 
sell stock- ot every description on commission, unice : No. so* Montgomery 
street (Nevada Block.) " Jan. -. 

SAKTJEL McKEE & CO., 
rokersantl Dealers in Stock Privileges, Puts and Calls, 

i"24 ModI . Jan. 1. 



B 



a. A. Hickos.] HICK.0X, KUEL & CO., [H. G. Kohl. 

Stockbrokers, 302 Sausonie street, corner California, are 
now prepared to buy and sell Stocks on Commission, ai:d loan 1 
Stcck;. All orders intrusted to our care will receive our most careful attention. 



George E. Maguire. 



Bowra F. Child, S. F. Stock Exchange. 

CHILD & MAGTJTRE, 

Commission Stock Brokers. 433 California street. ---Stocks 
Bought, Sold and Carried on Margins liberal Advance on active accounte. 
Sight and Time Drafts on National Bank of Republic, New York, in sums to 
suit. June 7>. 

e. p. pe:keam, 

C Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock Ex- 
J change, «8 California street. Stocks bought, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive prompt execution and return. 
[June. 19.] 



E. CAHILL & CD-, SIOCKBEOEEBS, 
406 cTontgomery Street- 



Dec. 11. 



HTJBBAED & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers. 322 and 324 California street, 
San Francisco, will transact business through the San Francisco Stock and Ex- 
change Board. July li". 

F. G. BEEET, 

Late of Berry A- Capp. Commission Stock Broker. Office at 
former place of business, 41S Montgomery street. Sept l>. 

WIRE AND WIKE ROPE FOR SALE IN ST03E OR IN BOND. 

ITktfltrf B miles * ^* os - s ailtl 9 » <-alvaniz"eii Telegraph Wire. 
ej\y\ V 200 Ceils Galvanized Wire Rope for Ship Rigging. In Store— All kinds 
of Wire, Galvanized on Black iron, Brass, Copper, Steel, Market, Stone, Spring, 
Tinned, etc., etc. In Stock and Made to Order — 

BRASS A>"D IRON WIRE CLOTH, 

Battery Screens, Fly Cloth, On d Screens, Wire Netting, Galvanized or 

not : Ornamental Wire Work of all kinds. Staples, Riddles and Selves of :tl! kindB, 

Flower Stands, Summer Houses, and evervthiuur that can be made from Wire 

A. S. 1IALLIDIE, 113 Pine street, S. F. 

WJBE ROPE, 
FJMat anil ronail, of Iron or Steel, on hntnl or 111 arte to order 

5? "f unequaled excellence. Picture Cords, Sash Cords, etc., etc. 
Jan. 2-2 . A S. HALL1DIK. 113 Tine s t r eet. 

MONEY TO LOAN. 

John T. Tittle. Money Broker an J Heal Estate Agent. dis- 
counts notes and loans ruonev on all kind.- of collaterals in large amounts: buys 
and sells real estate. OFFICE. 405j CALIFORNIA STREET 

I>ec. 25. " Opposite Bank of California. 



O 



15,000 T05TS 7-FE MONTH 
f Blnelt Diamon 1 and oilier :wt. Diablo Coals received and 
[or&leby [Moy2S.J P. B. CORNWALL, Preset B. D. Coal Mini 



eb. 18, 1870.1 



CALIFORNIA AH\ 



15 



COLUMN FOR THE CURIOUS, 

In Nature, Science, nod Art. 

icod by "Whales ui Shotl mcV — \n . \. i:ii 
' north from I. 

■- a u ti.> " : 
il .ui. I tumble u it in pl»y, 
put off uid but iii 

Iwglj furious, 
■ 

m ntn into ji mii.iII boat lying at 
I brow n "ii hor beam ond 

Hit* two linn hud :\ DO] I 

k, to which they clung. Since 1 1 

to £o aear them. The brtest word from 
! to have made 
re unices driven out or captured by something 
ii small Gshuur-boate. The Snner i> one of \ b 
• t ia .--Mum they go in shoals, u in tb< 
ed t" the voe in pursuit of h< i 
n kjioh n bo follow ships long dial 
Gcethe and the Suez Canal.— Tin- following Letter appears in the 

! I 

■:.■! German : Eckermann i 
to have said in 1827 that he wished to see three things. A a 
mg the Gulf of Mexico and the Pa* er connecting the Rhi 

iube, and lastly, in the third place, I should like to see the English 
! [ a Sum canal I should like to live to see those threi jreal 

-. nud for them it would be well worth while to endure another 50 
v I t philosopher was then 68 years old. It is not :\ little 

- !i;i- been realized within the period limited by 
pn. The original pa Gtoprache nut Goathe na, voL 

Bd, Feb. L't. ! -_ . •■ Endlich dritb ns mochte ich die Bnglan- 

B«r in. Canals von Suus Behen. Diese drei grosses 

wire wohl den Mtthe werth ihnen zu Iii b a ich 
I am, sir, poors faithfully, Frame T. 
DuIm 5 b Jan. 

Electrical S^ieuce and Telegraphy. —The New York Tribum gives 
'.nt of what : i] .: wry remarkable discovery in electrical 

i v. it ia claimed that a new kind of electricity has 
been obtained, differing from the old in several particulars, and notably in 
luring for transmission that the conducting wire shall be insulated. 
! value of this* discovery can only be ascertained by 
iment, it may here be mentioned that there is nothing in- 
obable about it. The difference claimed between the new 
aiul old electricities ia acarcely greater in kind than between polarized and 
non-polarized light, or between ordinary iron and that which ha* heen .--.. 
intact with platinum that the strongest nitric acid fails to at- 
t;fk it. A genuine discovery of the sort would be of inestimable service 
pening tin- telegraph, cable rates would Boon be permanently ro- 
und the unsightly poles that now disfigure our cities would quickly 
pBappear. 

Strange Passengers. — The Mi ssagt r du Midi tells a startling story. A 
merchant vessel arrived at Marseilles recently, laden with ungar from Ea- 
■via. While in the act of unloading, the workmen suddenly left their 
task, and, rushing up to the deck, gasped out inarticulate words. Amongst 
he liamp. ts they had found three immense boa-constrictors. These rep- 
ented to wake from a state .>f Lethargy, and advanced towards the 
prrified men, who had only just time to hoist themselves on deck and close 
tin.' hatches. The captain was, of course, obliged to suspend the operation 
of unloading, and to look for a means of getting rid of these strange pas- 
Two pigeons were poisoned with -strychnine, and dropped into 
Ebe hold. They wen- devoured at once, but only two of the serpents died. 
The third reptile has not been seen again, and it is with the greatest 
rouble that the captain can get men to assist him in unloading his ship. 

A very curious and most interesting fact has come to light at the 
British Museum. Among the collection of old plays (presented to that 
institution by Mr. Coventry Patmore in 1S64) which formerly belonged to 
R. Brinsley Sheridan, has been found the Sialograph original of the comedy, 
The Trip to Bath, written in 174'.' by Mrs. Frances Sheridan, his mother, 
and which, it is said in Moore's " Life of Sheridan," was the source of his 

Slay The Rivals. A very slight comparison of the two plays leaves no 
pubt whatever of the fact, and in the character of "Mrs. Malaprop," 
Sheridan has actually borrowed some of her amusing blunders from the 
original " Mrs. Tryfort " without any alteration whatever. 

The obituary of the Times of the 5th inst contained some rare il- 
lustrations of prolonged existence in twelve persons— viz., ten ladies and 
two gentlemen— whose united ages amounted to 1,053 years, giving an av- 
erage of eighty-seven-years and nine months to each. The oldest, as is 
generally the case, was a lady, who was in her hundredth year, the young- 
est of the same sex being eighty-two years of age ; the gentlemen were 
Eighty three and eighty-four respectfully. The following were the ages — 
viz., eighty-two, two at eighty-three, two at eighty-four, two at eighty- 
six, eighty-seven, eighty-nine, ninety-four, ninety-five, and one hundred. 
Of septuagenarians there were seven, who averaged exactly seventy-four 
years of age. 

The site of Ancient Miletus is being excavated by a French archjeol- 
ggist, M. Rayet. Sixty-four statues have been found, and the treasures 
Glared with the Turkish Government, one half being sent to the Louvre, 
and the remainder to the Stamboul Museum of Antiquities. 

A correspondent of the Animal World writes ; " ' A tenant erected 
a pump in his piggery to pump the whey out of the cheese-room. One day 
I saw an i>!d pig deliberately take the handle of the pump into its mouth 
and pump itself some whey." 

Cope's Tobacco Plant states that the Board of Inland Revenue have 
prohibited the manufacture of a class of "infernal machines " known as 
explosive cigars, by means of which cruclmisehief has frequently been done 
by practical jokers. 

An ebony casket, with a silver figure of a donkey on top, has been 
presented to the Baroness Burdett Coutts by the members of the Colum- 
bia Costermongers 1 Club. 



[ U>\ i 

A ROGUE'S RETROSPECT. 

■ 
" LoiiiiK PickcriiiK.' lali 

■ 
. 

I 
..I be bad itai 

[From the Ken I .int... i? a? 

" Arrest of Pickering late Editor of the St. Louie Union. — t»ODM< 
oneni ■' counts do uol received. It l» i 

"-l:itr<l. by Iho Joseph 

"byMessi , Trcai A KrumniD ntly committed to the < ■■■■ 

" But riff, ■■] one - t ■ :- di putles, ol Bui bnnan County. Whl i tn ■ 

off to pane unknown. The party In purtnlti 
rod from him, and do otnoi proj 
Thoeu ii pnr-i. i, we an- loi.i, were no! prepared with any itmhuriiy to 
"follow iiim bay nd the Umltsofthe Si . i«A." 

Prom tno i ora Tribune, June 80, I 

** The Absquatulator. — information wae received from Bt. Joseph ye«ier- 
(v. Krumron & Treal came Dp with Pickering al thai place; Ihnl 

" they coroponndrd w iili blm for bli offenses 1>\ receiving some |7( money and 

" about $4,000 in notes of hand, WUon the boat lift lie 

"was Ql tin's on I for California, and they were returning by easy ctuyes to St. 
"Louis.- St. Louis Republican* IMA." 

T 'The ahovo named Lorlng Pickering is now one of the Proprietors of the San 
Francisco ihuhj Evening Bulletin and Morning Cull, two papers published in 
tide city.) 

LE\ & PERRUN'S CELEBBATED WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE, 

Declare:! by Connoisseurs to be tne Only Good Sauce.. »In 
UOllBUipn nue of spurious imitations of l,::.\ A: I'hKllINS' SAUCE, whiol 

calculated to deceive the public, Lea & Perrins have adopted a (tbw label, bearing 
their signature, LEA & PKRK1NS, which a ill be placed on oveij bottle ol WOR< ES- 
TERSUiRJi SAUCE, after this date, and without which none Ugcnuine. November, 
1874. Thia does Dot apply to shipments made prior to the date given. 

Ask for Lea & Perrins' Sauce, and see name on wrapper, label, bottle and stopi* r. 
Wholesale and for export by the proprietors, Worcester ; Crosse & BlackweU, Lon- 
don, eU;., etc., and by grocers and oilmen throughout the world. To be obtained of 

August -IS. MKSSKS. UKOSS & CO., San Francisco. 

HEATING'S COUGH LOZENGES. 

Upwards of lifty years experience Ii»n 1 ully confirmed the 
superior reputation ol these Lozenges in the Cure of ABthma, Winter Cough, 
Qoorseness, Shortness of Breath, and other Pulmonary Maladies, Sold in bottles of 
various sizes. KHATINCS BON-BONS, or CHILDREN'S WORM TABLETS, a purely 
vegetable sweetmeat, furnishing both in appearance and taste b most agreeable 
tn.. tln->l of administering a well-known remedy for Intestinal or Thread Worms. It 
is a perfectly safe a.'id mild preparation, and ..'specially adapted for Children. Sold '" 
bottles of various sizes. THUS. ILEAT1NG, London, 

Export Chemist and Druggist. 
Indents for Pure Drugs and Chemicals carefully executed. 
Agents— Charles Lasoley & Co., comer battery and Clay sts., S. F. June 29. 

MARAVILLA COCOA. 

Taylor Ri*<;tlierN (flie 1;; !■:;*-■.* OlatunfbcXUiera of rncoa Ii» Furopr), 
having the Exclusive Supply of this unrivaled Cocoa, Invite comparison with 
any other Cocoa for purity, flno aroma, sanative, nutrattve ami Bustainfne power, 

i;;isuicss of digestion, and especially High Delicious Flavor. One trial will estab- 
lisii ii as a favorite beverage for breakfast, luncheon, and n soothing refreshment 
after a late evening. N. B. Caution— " M A K A VILLA" is u registered Trade Mark. 

MAEAVILLA COCOA. 

The f;Soi»e»«:;.T», "Taylor Brothers 1 Bfaravllln Coeon faeaneblered n 
thorough success, and supersedes every other Cocoa in the market. Entire 
solubility, a delicate aroma, and a rare concentration of the purest elements ol nu- 
trition, distinguish the Mara villa Cocoa above all others. For invalids and dyspep- 
tics, we could not recommend a more agreeable or valuable beverage." Forfurtber 
favorable opinions vide Standard, Morning Post, British Medical Journal, etc., etc. 

HOMEOPATHIC COCOA. 

Thl* original prepm-ntim hits ntlitfreti :> *v«>rlrt.wi«?e repiit:ttio», 
and is manufactured by TAYLOR BROTHERS, under the ablest Honueopathic 
advice, aided by the skill and experience of the inventory, and will be found to com- 
bine in an eminent degree the purity, fine aroma, and nutritious property of the 

fresh nut. 

S0LTJBIE CHCC0IATE. 

Made In one niflitute wttfroEtt boilir e: — The nbove orlielen urt pre- 
pared exclusively by TATLOE BROTHERS, the largest manufacturers in 
Europe, ami sold in Lin-lined packets onlv, bv storekeepers and others all over the 
world. STEAM MILLS, BRICK LANE, LONDON. Export Chicory Mills. Brnges, 
Belgium. May 10. 

ROWLANDS' 0D0NT0 

Wlii tens ami preserves 41ie lee id. prevents audi rrrests their 
decay, strengthens the gums, and gives -.< pleasing fragrance to the breath. 
The success of the lost seventy-five years has proved its superiority over all other 
preparations for the teeth. Sold everywhere by all druggists, chemists and patent 
medicine dealers. Ask for Rowlands' Odonto, of 20, Hatton Garden, London, and 
avoid all imitation s^ M ay 1. 

CONSUMPTION, INDIGESTION AND WASTING DISEASES. 

The most approved remedies are Paseerentie Emulsion an<l 
Pancreatine. The original and genuine prepared only by SAY< IK'S & M< IORE, 
113 New Bond-street, London. Sold by them and all Chemists and Storekeepers 
throughout the w orld. May 15. 

CAUTION— BETTS'S PATENT CAPSULES. 

Thepuiilie » re reMgief't fully cnoOoned «Sa:il Bella's Patent Cnptculen 
are being Infringed. BETTS'S name is upon every Capsule be makes lor the 
leading Merchants at home and abroad, and he Is the Only Inventor and Sole Maker 
in the United Kingdom. Manufactories : l, A\ hakf Road, CityBOad.Lckdon, 
ASi)BoBBEAi'.\', Ekance. June li>. 

J. H. CUTTER OLD BOURBON. 
jM P. Moorman A Co., Manufacturers, Louisville, Ky.— 

\_7# Tlie above well-known House ia represented here by the undersigned, who 
have been appointed their Hole Agents For (be Pacific Coast, 
July 3. A. P. 1IOTALIXG & CO., 429 and 431 Jackson street, S. F. 



S 



JOSEPH GULOTT'S SEEL PEPS. 
old by all Stationers throughout the World. Sole Aareut 

for the United States : MR. HENRY OWEN, ill John street, N. Y. Jan. 1U. 

"WA"TED, 

By a respectable and industrious young' man, a situation 
in a lir ;t-ela.ss bouse as Salesman or Assistant bookkeeper. Rest of references 
given. Address " K," this ortiee Jan. 22. 

QUICZ3ILVER. 

For sale—Iu lots tosnit,by Thomas Bell, Xo. 305 Sanaomc 
street, over Bank of California. Nov. 1(5. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 12, 1876. 



TO-MORROW. 

I sit and muse beside the faded coals, 

While, night and silence hold their mystic sway, 
And while the world, with all its freight of souls, 

Wheels on through darkness to another day ! 
Across my spirit ghostly fancies creep ; 

Who shall dare prophesy to-morrow's light ? 
What if unaccounted thousands, while they sleep, 

Are trembling on eternity to-night ? 
And still they haunt my heart, those dreams forlorn, 

Vague bats of fear that sunshine would dismay ; 
Though myriads of to-morrows have been born, 

What if the last had perished with to-day ? 
But no ! the ancient ordinance yet reigns ; 

Hours afterward, while seated here, 
I dimly see, along my casement panes, 

The first pale dubious glimmerings appear. 
Once more the old fated ways of earth begin ; 

Some glad girl somewhere will soon wake and say, 
While blushing from chaste forehead to sweet chin, 

One lovely rose, " It is my wedding day !" 
And in some prison cell, perchance even now. 

Some haggard captive, from his sleep is drawn, 
To hear them, while cold sweat-drops bead his brow, 

Nailing a scaffold in the ghastly dawn ! 

— Edyar Fawcett Rowe. 



DIRECT TAXATION THE NECESSITY OF REPUBLICS. 

The only enduring basis of a republic is perfect equality. Equality of 
law, equality of right and equality in the pursuit of happiness. Less 
than this, may be a republican plutocracy — a republican empire or mon- 
archy, but certainly it is not a republic in esse. Recognizing government as 
the only means of attaining this desired end, it follows that government 
itself should be so constituted as to bear an equal and exact relation to 
all of the people governed. To carry out this idea, it becomes necessary 
to distribute the burdens of government with impartial justice, and as 
these burdens are comprised in the financial cost of government, the 
matter is resolved into the perfection of a revenue system that will only 
exact from the people in a. degree measured by their ability to pay. This 
ability consists in the amount of property possessed by the individual, 
and it should be taxed in an equal pro rata. It is true, the man in mod- 
erate circumstances may enjoy equal felicity with the millionaire, but 
both classes are necessarily taxed for the benefit of paupers and persons 
devoid of property, and not unjustly, for if the aggregate wealth repre- 
sents a certain amount per capita, it proves that the classes possessing 
property enjoy a greater degree of happiness than those who do not, con- 
sequently they should, according to ability, bear the burdens of govern- 
ment in proportion. The world still suffers from that feudalism which 
was based on the superiority of a favored class, whereas, the idea re- 
gards all men as equal. Suffering will continue just as long as feudal 
customs prevail, and the modern theory is not perfectly enforced. The 
custom of imports and other indirect taxes is one of the feudal legacies. It 
is a system which does not tax property, correctly speaking, but con- 
sumption. It taxes the necessaries of life, in the first place, free (as 
upon production they are) and by a course of taxation delivers them to the 
people at exorbitant cost. " The necessities of government,'^ you will 
say, but if government is for the benefit and not for the oppression of peo- 
ple, we ask you where the benefits of such government may be found ? 
Governor Tilden aptly remarks, " A tax that starts in its career by dis- 
turbing the natural courses of private industry, and imparing the produc- 
tive power of labor, and then comes to the consumer distended by profits 
of successive intermediaries and by insurance against the risks of a fickle 
or uncertain governmental policy, and of a fluctuating standard of value, 
blights human well-being at every step. When it reaches the hapless 
chil'l of toil who buys his bread by the loaf and his fuel by the basket, it 
robs him of his earnings and inflicts starvation." 

Such a system is a relic of barbarism. It taxes mankind for the privi- 
lege of existence ; it paralyzes man's noblest energies and efforts ; it robs 
him in his day of vigor and leaves him helpless in his misery ; it is an 
apotheosis of oppression ! We insist that property alone should be taxed, 
and not production. Thus the real and personal property, such as the 
States now tax individually, should pay tribute to the general Govern- 
ment. Of course this means Free Trade, but what if all the world were 
united under one Government ; would not that mean Free Trade ? If 
these United States— happily joined — were dissevered, we should find a 
Custom House at every frontier where now we pass undisturbed to 
exchange our productions. And so, if there should be Free Trade every- 
where it would not detrimentally effect any one. The Custom House is 
a mill-stone on the neck of commerce, and any nation removing it is a 
benefactor of mankind. These are serious thoughts. Our indirect taxa- 
tion is sucking the life-blood of the country. Change it and the current 
will flow back with vigor ; but unless it is changed, the day will come 
when the people on the Pacific Coast will rise up with their fellow-robbed 
citizens of the West and South and overturn an impoverishing Govern- 
ment. Human nature will only* endure wrong to a certain limit, and 
"To this condition must we come at last." 



ELECTIVE JUDICIARIES. 
The New York journals, in dealing with the question of elective 
and appointive judiciaries, conclude, after a fair trial" of both systems, 
that the latter is the only sure method of securing able and impartial 
judges. The evil of making judicial offices dependent on political in- 
trigue and uncertain popular selection cannot be over-estimated. The 
office is one requiring " the man whose firm and noble soul no factious 
clamors can control." Such a man must decline to drag the ermine 
through political mires. He rather holds aloof, leaving the office to be 
filled by third-rate men, who are not troubled with such honorable scru- 
ples. Thus the people are the losers by their own stupid fatuity. If we 
are to have a Constitutional Convention, this subject deserves more atten- 
tion than it is likely to receive, but if the legal profession take the matter 
in hand, thev can bring it to a desirable issue. Let all judicial officers be 
appointed and bold during gcod behavior, the Governor to name Supreme 
Judges, and the latter to appoint all subordinates. 



LORD DE REDCLTFFE ON THE EASTERN QUESTION. 

This great man has at last broken silence on the Eastern Question, 
or rather, v^| may say, the Turkish Question, and all will admit that he 
speaks with authority, and not as the general run of uninstructed scribes. 

Exactly half a century has passed since Lord Stratford de Redcliffe, 
then Mr. Stratford Canning, formed his first responsible acquaintance 
with Eastern diplomacy — not, however, his first practical acquaintance, 
for that began sixteen years earlier, when, in 1809, he was appointed Sec- 
retary of the British Embassy at Constantinople. In 1825, when his 
celebrated cousin of the same name was Minister fpr Foreign Affairs, 
Mr. Canning went back to the Court of the Sultan as Ambassador Extra- 
ordinary, and from that time until 1858 he exerted a paramount influence 
over the counsels, both internal and foreign, which shaped the destiny of 
the Ottoman Empire. By his policy and the force of his representations, 
the English Government, backed by the vehemently expressed sympathy 
of the whole country, committed itself to the line of action which 
brought us into collision with Russia, and led to the war, the net outcome 
of which was the treaty whicli the Czar formally repudiated a few years 
ago, without a word of remonstrance from the Powers which had pur- 
chased it at so dear a price. 

Russia has been still further avenged by seeing her Minister succeed to 
the position of absolute power which was for so long a time occupied by 
the representative of her rival. General Ignatieff s will is popularly be- 
Heved to be studied and fulfilled by the Sublime Porte with scarcely less 
reverence than the inspired precepts of the Koran. 

Lord Stratford de Redcliffe deprecates England holding aloof from the 
Eastern question. He is of opinion that we ought to assert a right to 
share in managing it as long as it lasts, and in solving it when the time 
comes for its solution. If we stand aside, Russia will contrive to have 
her own way ; whereas, if we insist upon the five or six great Powers be- 
ing admitted to an equal partnership in the business, England would be 
able to outvote Russia, and to keep the direction of it in her own hands. 
This is the idea which was predominant a quarter of a century ago, and 
at that time what could be urged in its favor ? But, as Mr. Disraeli 
would say, a good many things have happened since then. The old 
balance of power is destroyed. France, then so powerful, is at present 
effaced ; and Prussia, whose neutral attitude during the Crimean war was 
the theme of never-ending invective, now, at the head of Germany, wields 
the resources of the greatest military Empire in the world. It is impos- 
possible any longer to regard the Eastern question as a mere struggle be- 
tween Russia and the Western Powers. It no longer wears an aspect of 
such simplicity. The unquestioned strength of Germany puts an end to 
all exclusive and even to any preponderating right of interference, while 
the necessity for interference is immensely diminished. Only three Powers 
are co-operating' now, and their co-operation is so far from complete that 
one of them is suspected of countermining the other two by intrigue at 
Constantinople. What might we expect if England, France and Italy 
were to be admitted to share their councils ? The chances are that before 
long, instead of combining to govern Turkey, they would draw the sword 
upon one another, in order to determine the previous question as to what 
is to be done with Turkey. Their quarrels might prove a happy deliver- 
ance for the Sultan, but could hardly fail in leading to the only result 
to" be guarded against by these elaborate precautions, that of "throwing 
all Europe into a state of hurtful agitation, if not into one of general 
hostilities." 

THE NEWS LETTER'S HOROSCOPE. 

It now remains for the News Letter to take another enterprising 
step. Instead of contenting itself with what has transpired during the 
seven days previous to its publication, it will hereafter post the public 
every Saturday morning upon what will occur during the week to 
come. We are now in possession of extraordinary facilities, which places 
the future at our entire disposal in advance of any other line. 

The following order of the coming week has been carefully prepared at 
our expense, which, although enormous, is scarcely worth mentioning here. 
Its authenticity may be relied upon. 

The Impersonal Journalism Bill will pass by a large majority, compel- 
ling DeYoung to father the City Lyrics in the Chronicle or discontinue the 
same. 

Pickering will have his gas metre inspected by Harry George, who will 
pronounce it correct and sue Loring for his fee. 

Marie Antoinette Nathalie Pollard will petition to the Legislature for 
another section in her name. 

George Bromley will petition to the Board of Supervisors for the right 
to lay down Brussets carpet in the principal streets. 

Beecher will meet Bowen on the ferry boat and hammer him over the 
head with a bung starter. 

Dion Boucicault will pen a letter to the Queen, asking her Majesty's 
permission to put up some Shaughran poster on the doors of Windsor 
Castle. 

A broker's clerk, on a salary of 830 a month, will dispose of his real es- 
tate on Van Ness avenue and go to New York to buy a seat in the New 
Stock Board. 

Ophir will be " about as usual, thank you." 

There will be no suicides either in the Overland or the What Cheer 
House. Michael Reese will get his old tweed coat dyed blue. 

Coll Deane will give his friends some points on Overman, which they 
will " copper" with one accord. 

Ella Wilton will be glad she hasn't got to play Juliet to Mrs.. 
Waller's Romeo. 

Flood & O'Brien will have a banquet with biUs of fare printed on the 
back of the News Letter and gold mounted. 



San Francisco is to be congratulated upon the recent acquisition of 
two of Washington's most popular society men. The handsome per- 
sonnel- and charming address of Pay Director Cunningham has already 
renewed here his brilliant social prestige in the East, while the arrival of 
Mr. Franklin Philp, to take charge of the clerical direction of the Naval 
Pay Department on this coast, brings to our midst a gentleman whose 
entertainments have be-in a distinctive feature of life at the Nation's Cap- 
ital for some years. No visitor to Washington for the past six years can 
fail to remember the famous collection of water-color paintings owned, 
by Mr. Philp, and the many other unique attractions the former ample 
fortune of this genial gentleman gathered around his beautiful residence. 
Mr. Philp is at present at the Palace. 



Postscript 



TO THE 





CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER. 




OfflwtJOr to G1S Merchant Ssitroet. 



VOLUME 26. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEB. 12, 1876. 



NUMBER 3. 



BIZ. 



The arrivals from sea daring the week passing under review have not 
been numerous, nor have imports from any quarter been urge. Four 
packet liners have reached us from the Islands, two from the Soci- 
ety and two from Hawaii. The first two from Tahita brought 
little island produce, but the two vessels from Honolula brought full car- 
• lugax, rice, etc, Business continues to jog along very sluggishly ; 
in fact there is no mew animation in any trade department. The Panama 
■feaamer reaching port on the 10th instant brought very little coffee from 
Central American porta, her cargo consisting chiefly of general merchan- 
dise from New York. 

The Rainfall to this date foots up 18-15 inches for 1875-6; 16-18 for 
1S74-5; 17-43 inches for 1873-1. This rain has been well distributed 
throughout the agricultural portion of the State, and is the harbinger of 
bounteous crops for the season before us. 

Tonnage continues to be very plentiful, and few wheat charters offer- 
in.: for the United Kingdom. The rate to a direct port for wooden ships 
G2a£2 s. 6d ; for iron, £2 5s.a£2 10s., for a small ship. Vessels proceed- 
itiL: from here in ballast to Portland, Oregon, get £3 5s. for wheat to Liv- 
erpool. We have quite a number of ships in port that are disengaged, 
with but very little new business to offer. 

It Is said that English capitalists are here with the intention of erect- 
ing a large brewery upon the Portrero, with the intention of manufactur- 
ing Ale and Porter, after the style of the best Scotch and English bottled 
peer. It is claimed by the parties engaged in this enterprise that the 
Water-Grain, Hops, Syrup and all needed ingredients required are as 
good as can be had in Old England, and with plenty of capital and ma- 
chinery near at hand, we may look for a big brewery ere long. It is well 
known to the readers of the Jfews Letter that the Starr Brewery has been 
here in successful operation for two years, making Pale Ale ana Porter of 
good quality. This is bottled and delivered to consumers, and gives good 
satisfaction. There is, however, combined and active opposition to it, and 
comes from houses largely engaged in the sale of Scotch, English and 
Irish Ale, Porter and Brown Stout ; and these wholesale dealers are not 
Willing to admit that any success has yet been attained by Merrifield & 
Rosener in the manufacture of California bottled Ale. In this respect, 
we think they are mistaken, and we believe that Starr Ale for present use 
is as good as the best " East India Ale " made on the Clyde, or elsewhere. 
We have now in this city 35 Breweries, chiefly engaged in the manufacture 
of Lager Beer ; of these local breweries the Philadelphia Brewery i3 the 
largest, having made last year 36,700 barrels ; the Empire and Hibernia 
each, 18,000 barrels ; the Chicago, 17,700 barrels ; the Albany and Wash- 
ington each, 15,700 barrels ; the San Francisco, 14,225 barrels ; the United 
States and Pacific each, about 12,000 barrels. There are 20 remaining 
that turn out yearly from 10,000 barrels down to 1,000 barrels each, and 
5 that make from 650 barrels down to 100 barrels. This Lager Beer sells 
at $6@7 pep barrel. The total quantity made here in 1875 was 249,266 
barrels of t, 477, 980 gallons, showiug an increase of 126,000 gallons over 
the year preceding. The capital engaged is very considerable — say 
82,000,000 — and pays a tax to Government of §250,000 per annum — say 
$1 per barrel. About 1,000,000 gals, are exported per annum, and the 
balance chiefly consumed in the State at large. 

The Barley market has shown some activity during the week, there 
being an overland demand from Cincinnati, St. Louis, Omaha, etc We 
quote Chevalier at SI 40 ; Brewing, SI 30@$1 35 ; Feed, 31 22£@$1 25 
per ctl. 

Hopa — The stock is free, with a light demand. Sales during the week 
of 40 bales, fair quality, 12£c ; the best quality held at 15c. 

Bags and Bagging. — Attention is still centered upon Calcutta as the 
chief source of supply of Grain Sacks and Hessian Piece Goods the 
present season. Large contracts for summer delivery of 22x36 bags have 
been made at 10@ll£c. Latter closing price — Hessian, 45 inch, 84j(aj9c. 
Wool Sacks are beginning to be called for at 45, 50@55c, according to 
size. 

Borax. — Holders are firm in exacting full rates, say, 7@7^c for Con-* 
centrated in sacks, 8@84c in boxes and bbls. Refined, 9i@9|c 

Quicksilver. — Contracts for the year have recently been entered iftto 
for 500 to 700 flasks per month for Eastern account, at 60c and upwards. 
The present rate is 60@63c, not 70@75c, as we see printer! in a so-called 
" prices current " dated the 9th inst. The stock on sale in the city at this 
moment is light, and the Belgic, hence for China, will, it is thought, carry 
a small quantity, unless it can be obtained at 60c. Complaint is, made in 
some quarters that small flasks are used in certain casp,s holding only 
some 65 lbs, or thereabouts, instead of 76£. 



Candles. —The San Francisco Factory is now in full operation, sell- 
ing 1 at 15a 17£c for 14 oz., and 12c. for 12 oz. Harkncss' command 20c. ; 
Mitchells, 20 a 22c; Sperm, 31 a 32c, Paraffine, 20 a 22c. 

Cement.— We note sales ex ship of about 3,500 bbls. English Portland 
at 34 50 per bbl. 

Coal— There is a short supply of Australian in market, and the cargo 
price advanced to £10 25 a 810 50 ; English, the same ; British Columbia, 
$10 a 911 ; California Mount Diablo steam, $6 25 a 38 25 ; Cumberland, 
518 a £22 ; Anthracite, $12 a S15. 

Coffee.— The market is firm at 20c a 22c for all Greens. 

Metals.— We note sales of several hundred boxes Tin Plate at 38 50 a 
S9 50 for Coke and Charcoal. 

Pig Iron is in excessive stock, prices ruling from 330 a 33 per ton. 

Oils. —The price of China Nut has fallen to 09 a, 70c ; Linseed, 70 a 75c ; 
Kerosene in cases, 25 a 40c, according to quality. 

Provisions. — Butter of choice quality, fresh roll (new grass) is very 
plentiful at 25 a 30c ; Bacon Sides, 13 a 15c ; Hams (Sugar), 16 a 17c for 
covered, and uncovered, 13 a 14c ; Lard, 13 a 16a ; Beef, Mess in bbls., 
38 50 a 39 ; Pork, Extra Clear, 324 per bbl ; Extra Prime, 317 50. 

Rice. — The stock is lartre. Some 4,000 mats China Mixed sold at 5c; 
No. 1 China, 6c ; No. 2, 5#c ; Hawaiian Table, 7h a 7ic. 

Salt. — We have a year's supply of Liverpool on hand. We quote fine 
factory filled store, 317 a 317 50 ; Coarse, 311 a 312 50 ; Calif ornia Crystal, 
$12 -i 313 per ton. 

Spices — Stocks are heavy. We quote Cassia, 23 a 24c ; Cloves, 45 a 
50c ; Nutmegs, 90 a 92c ; Pepper, 13 a 15c ; Pimento, 15c. 

Spirits. — The market is sluggish for Cognac Brandy, Holland Gin, Ja- 
maica Rum, etc The chief beverage here is Whisky, Old Bourbon, J. H. 
Cutter and Gold Dust taking the lead. Hotaling's Cutter, the only gen- 
uine in the market, sells at 32 50 a 35 50 per gallon, according to age. 

Sugar. — There is some very superior China Refined here selling at 10@ 
lie Hawaiian Grocery Grades command 8(2jl0ic; California Golden* 
10@ll£c ; Bay Cube, m@13e ; California Crushed, 12@12Ac The stock- 
of Raws is light, in fact stocks of all sorts are running very light for the 
season. 

Teas. — Macondray & Co. announce a public sale of Choice Oolongs and 
paper Japans, at the auction rooms of S. L. Jones, next week. The sub- 
ject of placing a tax of 15c per lb on Teas is now before Congress, and 
creates some little desire on the part of the trade to carry full stock. 

Flour. — We have no change in prices to record. Sales for export at 
S5 50(5*35 75. Extras for local useSO. Superfine for export 34 50@$4 75. 

Wheat-— The demand is good. Fair to choice-, for milling sell&at 31 87£ 
to 31 95 ; for shipping, 31 85 to 31 90, is, paid; common to. inferior lota 
31 75@31 80 If? cental 

Com. —Early in the week parcels, of Yellow sold at SI 35 a 31 40, but 
has since declined to 31 25 #* cental. 

Oats.— The range of the market is 32 05 to 32 35 ^ cental 

Hay.— Cargo rates rule from 313 to 318. 50 # ton. 

Potatoes.— Supplies are free at 31 to SI 65 # 100 lbs. 

Onions have advanced during the week to 31 75@S2 ^ ctl. 

Tallow. — Sales at 6i(aj7jc, according to quality and package. 

Wool--- Stock light. Small sales. Choice Northern Fleece, 19c; 
short staple ; medium, 10@12c ; Burry, 8@10c. 

Leather.— The demand is limited. We quote : Sole, 20 a 23c for 
light ; 22 « 24c for medium ; 24 a 26c for heavy. During January of last 
year we exported to Japan 292 rolls, valued at 315,205 ; 70 rolls to New 
York ; 30 rolls to England, etc In January, 1876, 27 rolls only to Ja- 
pan ; none to New York or England, but to Germany 236 rolls, valued at 
$10,900, 

A young lady who had j ust returned from completing her education in 
Boston, wanted to kiss her old lover last night, and her mother objected. 
The daughter drew up her queenly form to its full hight, and exclaimed: 
" Mother, terrible, tragical and sublimely retributive will be the course 
pursued by me if you refuse to allow him to place his alabaster .lips. ;fcft : 
mine, and enrapture my immortal soul by imprinting angelic sensations of 
divine bliss upon the indispensable members of my human physiognomy, 
and then kindly allowing me to take a withdrawer from his beneficent 
presence." The mother feebly admitted that her objections were Over- 
ruled. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 12. 



LIES OF THE DAY. 

A lie has no Ice's, ami cannot Btnnd ; but it Uas wings, and can fly far and wide.— 
Warbubtox. Witb the adaptability of a lie, sin has many tools, but a He is the 
handle which fits ihcm all— Lord Brougham. A lie begets others; one lie must be 
thatched with another or it will soon rain through.— Lord Thuklowb. 

" And the Parson made it his text that week, and he said likewise, 
That a lie which is half a lie is ever the blackest of lies ; 
That a lie that 1b all a lie may be met and fought with outright, 
But a lie which is Dart a truth 1b a harder matter to fight."— f hnstsos. 

San Francisco Lies. — It is not true that Inge is taking arsenic for his 
complexion. That Everson says it won't do, as he has tried it.— That 
Maj. Simpson and his horse will appear as " Mazeppa " shortly. — That 
Nat Messer says he will marry any one providing she has coin. That his 
good looks will compensate for any deficiency. That Joe Spear invited 
a friend to dinner, and asked him to pay his share. —That Lyman Mdwry 
is going to Campe out.— That in future Charles Brown will not send Ned 
Taylor to purchase a box for him at theater openings. 

Sacramento Lies. — It is not true that A. S. Crabell is daily seen at 
the Post-office corner.^— That Ned Buckley is conceited. That he ever 
writes letters to himself in an effeminate hand and addresses them to the 
theatre. ——That Miss Ada prefers the admiration of Mr. B. K. to that 
of any other gentleman in Sacramento. That both looked unhappy at 
the theatre on Monday night.— That Bob Farrell can dispense with his 
copying clerk. -— That certain ladies had too much color in their cheeks. 
^^That dark eyelashes are fashionable in Sacramento.— That there 
was one pretty girl at the theatre— Miss M.— — That Nancy had his hair 
parted on the side. Thathe captivated the ladies in the dress circle.— 
That certain gentlemen had business engagements out of the theatre be- 
tween acts.-^— That C. Wheeler had any candy, and that he passed it 
around to his friends.— — That married men are the beaux of Sacramento 
when their wives are away, and that this rule does not work with the 
opposite sex.-^— That Maguire had no Harte to see the end of the play. 
That he Sallied out as soon as possible. That Senator Roach felt un- 
happy at the benefit tendered Mrs. Pollard, because he was the only mem- 
ber present, and would have preferred to have been at the theatre. 

Grass Valley Lies. — It is not true that Henry Halsey rises before 
dawn and prays for " sunshine."^— That W. H. Benson is very social 
with " deadheads."— That Richard Oates is a reformed character.—— 
That Samuel D. Avery ever gives his friends striking proofs of affection. 
•^— That Tom Findley's advice is sought for as much as formerly. That 
he has reduced his armed escort.^— That George Murphy can mix any- 
thing but colors.—— That John Glass thinks his punishment more than 
he can bear.— — That Sam Beverton has lost his foreign accent.— That 
Bartle Johnson can fix his friends for " here and hereafter."— That Tom 
Moran's stock of stories ran out last week. That he would not believe 
our liar when told that " he would soon have enough to talk about. "— 
That William George is negotiating for a sewing machine agency. — That 
Grass "Valley has but one " ffran^e?'."— -That Sam Dorsey cannot decide 
which has most charms for him, "the church" or " the mill. "^— That 
George C. King wants a new hat band.— —That C. C. Wymore only 
smiles once a day. That when he has accomplished the task, like Rip 
Van Winkle, he has "I have sworn off."— That William C. Pope 
claims that " destiny, not choice, placed in his keeping so many eternal 
secrets. "^— That the Webster family allude with satisfaction to "our 
Daniel. "— That Stokes will give that inquisitive young man the best 
room in his house next time he visits Grass Valley. -^— That Emerson 
West knows how many grains of oats there are in a bushel. ' -" That 
Silvester is a dangerous man to tamper with. — That Gus Hamilton ever 
spreads his net without making a good haui.-^That S. G. Lewis knows 
the difference between footsore and footf hJill.^—ThaX the cold weather 
makes Hermann Eggert pant for the days when the thermometer shall 
register 98 5 in the shade.— That Grass Valley cannot grow thorns, but 
is prolific in Briers.— —That M. C. Taylor is a " solid man." 

Nevada Lies.— It is not true that Nevada City can boast a Fryer 
that can reduce ores without roasting. ^— That S. B. Davenport charges 
a high premium for insuring peace in certain quarrelsome families.— • 
That B. T. Allen is an ardent student of astronomy ; that he is trying 
to find a theory for increasing the duration of the quarters of the moon. 
—That R. W. Tully ever gives a narrow view of the railroad enter- 
prise.— — That William Wolf was ever known to growl. — That Alonzo 
Tower knows when he is well off. ^— That John Anderson has a weak- 
ness for the patriotic songs of Burns. ^— That Haskins will keep an eagle 
eye upon News Letter correspondence. ^— That John Bond never needs an 
overcoat.— That D. B. Merry looks sad whenever he sees a railroad 
curve. — That "Julius Csesar " is going to change his name to "Richard." 
—That the chilling manner of T. E. Mills is owing to his business.— 
That R. M. HuDt can ever be found when wanted.— That Charles 
Marsh carries a gauging rod in his walking cane. -^ That Rosenberg's 
dark eyes look most attractive by lamp light.— That G. W. Graves' 
profession must develop by natural progression.— That Hyman wears 
his tall hat for an advertisement^— That if Walters' coat was as thread- 
bare as his jokes, his unwashed linen would be visible.— That William 
Cyprus Groves is going to drop his second name.^— That Joe King makes 
a princely host.— That William Delay Long is famous for his rapid dis- 
patch in business. ^— That Harvey Cooper gave a good judgment on the 
railroad scheme. That the Goldsmiths are going to consolidate to avoid 
mistakes.^— That Oscar Montell will build his new house in the 
"Gothic" style.— That E. M.Preston is not a "spiritist."— —That 
Stewart can sing " Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep." 

North San Juan Lies. — It is not true that Hans Ipsonis a relative of 
the hero of Cooper's "Leather Stocking."— That L. Brooks hides his 
light under those willow trees.— That J. Stotlar heals more family jars 
than broken heads. That J. D. Fargusson weaves more troubles than 

carpets, i That S. S. Waterman is a lover of peace.— — That Furth 
wishes his property was one Block less.^— That A. J. Putnam cherishes 
the memory of old stagers.— —That A. B. Swan plumes himself upon the 
charm of his musical voice.— — That George Kramer is going into the 
sheep- shearing business this season.— That Huckins will have a public 
monument raised to his memory in San Juan. 



Sax Mat*) Lies. — It is a lie that the people rejoice over the death of 
the San Mateo Times,—— That they think their chances of securing the 
County Seat are somewhat improved.— That they still sigh fitfully for 
incorporation.^— That the streets are muddy in wet, and dusty in dry, 
weather.^— That the departure of Frank Stockwell is generally regretted. 
—That Eugene has sworn off for six months.— — That two-bit ante is 
the principal mode of livelihood of one section of the population. That 
the boys from the Coast know this to their cost. That they can rarely 
visit San Francisco, being generally broke in San Mateo while waiting for 
the train. That this is notably the case with Jack Flemming. That he 
has not seen the city in ten months in consequence. ' That Goodspeed 
considers the postal department seriously mismanaged.— — That he pro- 
poses to go to Washington to rectify it. — That Gimlet Bill is regarded 
as indispensable at any small tea or evening party. That Jacobson's 
whist game amounts to anything except blasphemy. ^— That Warren is a 
lineal descendant of the hero of Bunker Hill. That he doesn't like to be 
questioned on the relationship. ■ ■ ■ That Rosenheim has gone out of the 
fish business.— — That " wild herrings" have cleaned him out. That he is 
regarded as "a foolish man "in consequence.— —That there is nothing 
serious between Charley and Miss R. That it is only pure Platonism. — 
That the evening dancing school is becoming popular. — That more go 
there than require instruction.— That the moonlight nights, strange to 
say, do not increase its popularity.— — That the railroad agent ever reads 
novels. That he is partial to the works of Reynolds.^— That the Western 
Union Telegraph is falling into disrepute in San Mateo. That it serves 
them right. 

Martsville Lies. — It is not true that O. F. S. took two lady rivals to 

gent's return party. — That Andy C is doing the heavy at the Grand 

Hotel in San Francisco, with Chinese lottery results.-^— That Johnny 

E recovered from the effects of his Sacramento love's departure. 

That Warren G attends the Sabbath evening revivals s'nee the depart- 
ure of Miss B for Chico.- — That Dr. E. T. H and John H. 

J aspire to round dancing in their old age. That Miss Florence 

K is going to reside shortly in Oakland.— That Miss Corinne K 

objects to ladies appearing in costume at Turner's masquerade.— That 
young D street Misses should avoid old Oroville depot at night.— That 
L. B. A. wants to be a Granger and with the sisters stand.— — That G. 
H. B. is still hunting Bonanza.— That Andrew J. B is again mat- 
rimonially inclined.— That H. T. S. is not foolish enough to let next 

door opposition worry him. — That Mrs. Wm. E had rather a 

gushing time in Nevada City. " < ■ That it was a mistake A. C. B. having 
his brains butted out by a black goat whilst hunting, Sunday.— That 

Martin. C 's return from below is a gad-send to the Bank "Exchange. 

^— That Edward A. B is "Bostonially " inclined since leap-year 

parties. 

Trockee Lies. — It is not true that J. B. Duvall thinks his godfathers 
did not understand the fitness of things.— —That Stewart McKay has 
made a contract for a supply of brown bears for the coming season. 
That C. B. Brierlyhas ruined his voice singing the praises of Truckee. 
That Grazor & Stoll will supply San Francisco with a new Summer bever- 
age this year.— That Davis enjoys allusions to the "Prince of Denmark," 
or " a Fishmonger." That he repels all attacks by asking, " What's in a 
name ?"— That Gaylord is the Count D'Arcy of 'Truckee.^— That Peel 
can weary any County Judge in the State. That S. D. Weller has a 
weakness for tomatoes.— That Sisson, Wallace & Co. are going to build 
a Summer residence on Donner Lake. — That it will be surrounded by 
gardens of Oriental splendor.— That C. W. Young's intense gaze is ow- 
ing to the smallness of the hands of his watch.^— That J. S. Newland is 
going to change his location.— —That Truckee has a " Minerva," the high 
priestess of Science. 

North Bloomfield Lies. — It is not true that Mr. Hazeltine is writ- 
ing a history of Nevada county ; that it will be illustrated with sketches 
true to nature.^— That George Farley thinks walking better for his 
health than driving hence his limited patronage of McCluskey. That 
Weiss will be a marked man after the 14th of February.— That Simon 
Meyer wears his dress overcoat on Saturday afternoon to remind him of 
happier days.-^That William Montgomery can always see "spots on 
the sun" after 11 o'clock, a. m. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, corner First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yo- 
kohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

BELGIC February 16th and May lGth. 

GAELIC March lGth and June 16th. 

OCEANIC April 17th and July 17th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 3 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's "Wharf 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Jan. 22. 

FOE ARIZONA AND MEXICAN POETS. 

For CnpeSt. K.uc:ts, MjizMIsih . I.a I*;iz, (;»n.tiii:is and the Colorado 
River, tonching at Magdalena Buy, should sufficient inducement offer —The 

Steamship Captain, will leave for the above ports on 

at X'i o'clock M., from Folsom-street Wharf, connecting 

at the Month of the Colorado with the Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
Steam Navigation Company for all points on the River. Through Bills of Lading 
will be tarnished and none others signed. Freight will hi: received on Monday, 
27th instant. No freight received for Mexican Ports atter Friday noon, and BNlBor 
Lading for those ports must he accompanied by Custom-house and Consular 
Clearances. For freight or passage apply to 
March 6. B. M. HARTSHORNE. 610 Front street. 

J. H. CUTTER'S OLD BOTTEBON AND EYE WHISKY, 
annf actured by Milton J. Hardy A Co., Sons-in-Law and 

Successors of J. H. CUTTER, Louisville, Ky. E. MARTIN & CO., 

August 14. No. 40S Front street, Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



M 



A. S. EOSENBAUM & CO. 

Have removed to the Southeast corner of California and 
Battery streets, where they invite the attention of their custumers and others 
to their large "assortment of the Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOKING 
TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS and CIGAR1TOS. Consignments of Choicest Brands 
of Cigars received by every Steamer. [Oct. IS ] A. S. ROSENBAUM &, CO. 



Fob. 12. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



WUST POINT. 
Twfc. Oomi the l> *H room boUa 

In bw danling beauty vnii mine that night, 
Ai the muaia dreamily rota and fell. 

Ami tin- wiltttn whirled io ;» bUn <>f lik'kt. 
I qu tee them now ha the m tonbeiun^ gl 

un e billowy H-x>r, 
That riaee end falls with the mem dance, 

To a mask that Boata in my heart o»co more. 
A long half-hour In tin* twilight leavee 

of (he ahrubbery ihe, with coquettish Eaoo, 
And dainty arma in their flowing -t 

A dream oi aatina and love and lace. 
In the eplendor there oi her queenly smile. 

Through her two bright eyea 1 oould see the glow 

Of cathedral win.l<>us, ;w up the aisle 

We tniiix'heil to a music's el.th and flow. 
All in a dream of Commencement eve ', 

I remember 1 awkwardly buttoned n glove 
On n dainty arm in its flowing sleeve. 

With a broken sentence of hone and love. 
But the diamonds that Hashed in ner wavy hair 

And the beauty that shone in her faultless face, 
Are all I recall as I struggled there 

A poor brown fly in a web of lace. 
Yet a laughing, coquettish bee I see, 

As the moonlight falls on the pavement gray, 
I can hear her laugh in the melody 

Of the music across the way, 
And I kept the glove so dainty and small, 

That I stole as she sipped her lemonade, 
Till I packed it away I think with all 

Of thos** traps I lost in our northern raid. 
But I never can list to that waltz divine 

With its golden measure of joy and pain, 
But it brings like the flavor of some old wine 

To my heart the warmth of the past again. 
A short flirtation— that's all, you know, 

Some faded flowers, a silken tress, 
The letters I burned up years ago, 

When I heard from her last in the Wilderness. 
I suppose, could she see I am maimed and old, 

She would soften the scorn that was changed to hate 
When I cho^e the bars of the gray and gold, 

And followed the South to its bitter fate. 
But here's to the lads of the Northern blue, 

And here's to the boys of the Southern, jpay, 
And I would that the Northern star but knew 

How the Southern cross is borne to-day. 

— L. C. Strong. 

NEW BOOKS. 

Two of those works which D. Appleton & Co., of New York, 
know how to select so well and produce so admirably, both as regards 
letter press and illustrations, are now before us. The one is entitled 
" First Book of Zoology," and although the title would infer an elemen- 
tary work, it may profitably be studied by mature scholars. The author 
is Professor Edward S. Morse, and the book begins with fresh-water 
shells and snails, land and sea snails, mussels, etc., passing through the 
crustacete to insects, and touching even on birds. The portion devoted to 
inaect life is particularly interesting, and the direction for finding and 
studying their habitats and transformations are simple and instructive 
The illustrations are copious and excellent. The other work is Dar- 
win's "Movements and Habits of Climbing Plants," a book that has already 
attracted considerable attention, bringing into notice as it does the sensi- 
bility, if not positive reasoning, in plants, such as spontaneous movement, 
shrinking when touched, plants which ascend by simply climbing spirally 
around a support, and those endowed with irritable organs, which, when 
they touch anyjobject, clasp it. The little essay forms a fit sequel to the 
"Insectiverous Plants," also by the same author, and published with 
illustrations by the same enterprising firm. 

Sherman & Hyde have just published one of Mr. James A. Kerr's 
bright and sparkling songs. Its title is, "My Dear Little Jessie," and 
it was sung for two weeks with great success by the California Minstrels 
prior to its publication. 

" Gran'ther Baldwin's Thanksgiving, and other Ballads and Poems," by 
Horatio Alger, Jr. Loring, Publisher, Boston. 

Mr. Alger is the author of many popular series of books, among which 
we instance the "Ragged Dick," the " Tattered Tom," the "Luck and 
Pluck," the " Brave and Bold " series. We confess to believing his prose 
better than his poetry, but the essentially domestic character of many of 
his poems will recommend them to lovers of unemotional reading. There 
is one poem, however, which rises from the calm level of the others, as if to 
show what the author is capable of doing when he tries. It is entitled 
"John Maynard," and one cannot read it without a thrilL 
11 Margery Keith;" One of the Breakwater Series, from the prolific pen of 
Virginia Townsend. Pabliahed by Loring, of Boston. 

A charming book for girls and boys and those of a larger growth, full 
of fun and frolic and tender pathos. We read every word of it through at 
one sitting, and put it down with regret, slowly repeating to ourself the 
advice given to one of its boy heroes, from the writings of Jefferson : 
" Give up money, give up fame, give up the earth and all it contains 
rather than do an immoral act. And never suppose that in any possible 
situation, or any circumstances, it is best for you to do a dishonorable 
thing." 

It appears that Mr. C. Switzer, one of the largest cinnamon grow- 
ers at Colombo, gave the munificent subscription of 200,000 rupeeB (say 
£20,000) towards the festivities on the occasion of the Prince of Wales' re- 
cent visit to Ceylon. 



OUR QUACKS. 




The longer wo keep our columns open to the dlsciisnlnn of medical af. 
Ihln, the i done* becomes thai It l*n most dnngeront thine 

to send for a Doctor Id San Kninclpco unlets you know who yon an feud* 
log for. In view of Ihe fact- thai have come to our knowledge, we Ctrl 
aiannd that we shall be eqaaUj serving the profession and our citisana 
mnenUy when we publicly ask certain men: "Have you a diploma?" If 
they have, we will give them »n advertisement gratia. If tbey cannot an- 
■wer the mniy, the conclusion Is obvious, and the duty of tnetr patients 
plain. °7o append e list of practicing medical men, to whom wc now put that 
question. We shall add to It from time totune. 

Gentlemen, You Call Yourselves Doctors. Have You a Diploma? 

Azkykho, J F, traveling around. 

Adolphai, Henrv 4B Washington. 
■Aborn. E .s., Bf.K. cot Pobi a Kearny 



Jones, ike IV. lu Third. 
Jan be, k, sis Powell. 
Kelly, ] I 



Auenmikho, H, 3UJ Third Htrcct 

A aOHS i kin, AnoLi'ii, Prcs't Society 

German Physicians, 2j Kearny. 
Aiit-Muu, r. i;;is i\.st. 
Avery, a. N.ffttBueh. 
Aldrioh. Emely. 926 Market. 
Baldwin, H s.i,i2Cl«y. 
Bancroft, \v n, traveling around. 

Bl^HEKAN. Wm, Tubes' Hotel, OakPd. 

Uraman, J J.travc'lng »round. 

Brexan, PaulM, driflinir around. 

Brown J. (colored). 027 Union. 

Behrens, It C F, 742 Market. 

Bbro, C, dl8 California. 

Barter, A B.«ii O'Farrell. 

Browx, W Li-tiikk, ;hi Washington. 

Bordenwa], J.5IH Stockton. 

Breed, S F, 80 O'Faric". 

Barucn. .252 Minna. 

Bryant. C &,5M Taylor. 

Ulaxcharo, H, B'dway, n'r Stockton. 

Bexn, John F„ 28 Kearny. 

llARRAT, .InON.'JlO Pacific. 

Rennet, wm.JK Sixth. 

Bredull, A R G, 2121 Mission. 

Broad bent, C R, Auzerais House, S Jose 

Bailey, P. lb3 Tehama. 

Burke, G, 5M1 Sutter. 

Blther, G W.fiii Sacramento. 

Burr. C. i:3 Third. 

Bruck, A, Santa Crux. 

Conk, A S.224 POBt. 

Cook. C A, 224 Post. 

Carr, A L, 139 Bush. 

Cahlll, , 106 Stockton. 

Clark. Jonx Ed, g one to Healdsburg. 

Close, VV N, (GX-Pollccman) lt 22MiBB'D. 

Corbett, .2il2 Pacific. • 

Czapkav, L J, traveling around. 

Cohen, Simon. (*' old clo ">, 405 Kearny. 

Clapp.G H. < Farmer), Sonoma. 

Deaxe.CT, cor. Montg'y and Sutter. 

Dohorty, Wm K, 64!) Clay. 

Dwver, Joseph, 219 Pacific. 

Davis, M, 1038 Mission. 

Dunlap, A W, 138 1th. 

De Beizoti, M, traveling around. 

Dunning, O, S.W. Jackson & Sansome. 

Dodge, E E, beef knacker. 123 Ellis. 

•Draper, CF. alias Fox, Oakland. 

Demarest, J D, Hi? Commercial. 

Eichers, J, 507 Union. 

Eckel. J N, 325 Geary. 

Earl.M R, 1521 Second. 

Elmore, A C. 101:1 Washington. 

Ewing,E.23Fell. 

Euphrat.Fred (Peddler), Los Angeles. 

ESTEN, J, 108 Stockton. 

Ferris, A S, mat'ess-mak'r. 812 How'd. 

Elchler, , cor OakA RRav, Ala'da 

Fischer, Geo., (laborer), 314 Stockton. 

Fischer, Gustav, 501 Fell. 

Ferdenanderz, Manuel, 215 Kearny. 

Frankenberg J (Shoemaker), e21 Post. 

Finlgan, H, 545 Jackson. 

Fonskoa, D L, traveling around. 

Fillmore, D O (col'd cook) .328 Third. 

Fauterbaug, Sam. R« Pacific. 

French, K C, 461 Minna. 

Flchtner, Gustave.gone lo N.York. 

FichtniT, Charles.. .04 Fell. 

Gardaxowsky, A E, 1053 Broadway, 
Oakland. _ 

Gibbon, J F.cor. Commcrc'l & Kearny. 

Gilbert, John F, 729 Broadway. 

Gregorlo, A, 4travcllng round. 

Gales, Dan Virgil. 609Sao'to. 

Grover, A J, 408 Bush. 

Goss, W, I! Third. 

Holland, Gustave, late Hospital Stew- 
ard. 413 BuBh. 

Hatch, Hkxrv, alias H W (rag-gath- 
erer), drifting aronnd. 

Hall.S Hastings (alias Sam), ffll Cal. 

H0U2, Paul F," French Cook," drift- 
ing about. 

Hodgdon, C L, 10(3 Howard. 

Hastings, Alonzo Tom. Peddler. 

Halle. Richard B, 134 M Post. 

Handt. C 0,8 Kearny. 

Hlllcr. D A, 22.; Post. 

Hoglc, G, N.W. Jackson A Stockton. 

Hess, , Park street, Alameda. 

Hartman, A, 1123 Stockton. 

HoUlflter, G W, 13 Montgy. and Oakland. 

Hoffman. Mrs A M, U22 Folsoro. 

Howard, W (colored barber), 1159 Mis- 
sion street. 

Hiller, F, Senior, 224 PoBt. 

Horn, Jerome, 304 Post. 

Jordan. Louib J, 211 Geary. 

Josaelvn.BenJ F. r,l8 Sacramento. 

Jones, Wm, cor. New Montg & Natoma. 

Josselyx. J H, 22.i Sutter. 

Josselyn, WH, 303 Third. 
Those persons whose names appear In small capitals claimed to have dlplo 

mas from Institutions whose officers repudiate thoBe claims. 



Knapp, Henry. 109 O'Fiirn-ll. 

Kihdk.J II, Mark t and 8th. 

Kclley. , ,th Street Station, OaklVt. 

Lus.omli. Chun, guauk Institute, 629 
Oi ay street. 

•Lvforcl. Ben F.402Kenmy. 

Lonschi-ld, Uev W, a<m» to Germany. 

Ludelski. L, r >i5 Pine, 

LUBKLSKX, M L. W> FoUom, 

Logan, L K, HUH Market. 

Leavlti, A,2iiGeary. 

Martin, M P. [134 l-olsom. 

Mathew, Clarence, 71 Fourth. 

Maxwell, J S, incarcerated 

Meyer, A W. 914 Kearny. 

Miner, II N.S.W. Kearny and Jackson. 

Moreexo.Jobe M,4iiK Tehama. 

Morton. Wm WM Foif«-" 

Meyer. Siegfried, traveling uround. 

Metcalf, , 910 Franklin, Oakland. 

McGovrrn.C C, 11 Post. 

McSparron, Archibald, travol'g around. 

Mayon. T H, Alhambra Tut iter Build- 
ing, 319 Bush. 

Mott.N AC, i'O O'Farrell. 

Murphy, N S, 331 Kearny. 

MtrXRO, Geo F, 10 Post. 

Mason, JH, 223 Fifth. 

Mekricks. A, traveling round. 

Marshall. M E (colored), Sl'.i Jackson, 

Morton, Albert, 11 O'Farrell. 

Mavnsrd, ,71 Fourth. 

Mathews, I M, 38 Russ. 

Merril, A P, 111 O'Farrcl. 

McConeahy, S W. fi85 California. 

Newton. J li, t.ravelinc aronnd. 

Noble, W B, RussHouse. 

O'Neill, Howard D, 304 Front. 

O'Donxell, C C.S25 Kearny street. 

Owens. Evan, traveling around. 

Parsons, Lorenzo, 542 2d. cor. Brannan. 

Proses, JOSEPH, Assistant Physician 
German Hospital, B13 Third. 

Proschold, C, 113 Third. 

Pinchard. .IB (Bartender), 17 Third. 

Plilet.E R.V52 Waehlngion. 

Porter. D C, 43! Clementina. 

Qcinlix, A G, lSThird. 

Qiu-rlllecQ, M, 1119 Mission. 
Richard, E J, traveling around 

KubscI, F. F. sPnst 
Rappln, G, 1517 Stockton. 
RAPPrN, F G. travel'g round In Idaho. 
Randolph, PB, 141 Minna. 
RoyerLC (harneap maker), Idaho. 
Regensrurger. -T acor. Assistant Phy- 
sician German Hospital, 112 Powell- 
Regal, C O T, T70 Howard. 
Roll, John, S3,) Pacific. 
Roberts .Mrs. H, 10 Sixth. 
Rowell, Wm P, 28 Stone. 
Seeley, C M. 818 Fourth. 
Sciioexbero.G. 1315 Powell. 
Sherman, J A'240 Montgomery. 
Stuttmefater R (Tanner), 109 Dnpont 

and 1813 Powell. 
Sueermer, 11.911 Webster, Oakland. 
Schonwald, Franz, S5. Third. 
Sanders, D, 1028 1< Dnpont. 
Szarvash, A S T.1329 Dnpont. 
SzetBkl, Judas, 824 Picitfc. 
Smith, ED, 523 Kearnv. 
Stowe, C M. 110 Kearny. 
Sclzer, Edward. 50H Davis. 
Sposatt, N, Stockton. 
•Summers, HAM, 776 Howard. 
Tait, J G, lOMInna. 
Til ton, J. R.. 1215 Mission. 
•Thomas, Geo. F. traveling ronnd. 
Trask, J B, 512 Market. 
Tozer, Charles H, Oakland. 
Thfese, A A, 30S Sutter. 
Treat, J *a W, 523 Kearnv. 
•Thompson, Wm (alias " Old Dr. T.") 14 

Geary. 
Utter, Henry, 132>4 PoBt. 
Vigoureaux. A W, corner 3d A Mission. 
Valentine. C H (col'd cob'r,) 325X 4th. 
Vasltt, FB. 508 Kearny. 
Von Kaismor, C, bootblack, 783 Folsom. 

Vaudenberg, Jr. .drifting round. 

Wright, J w, 5 Kearny. 

Wilson, Wm,6M Howard. 

Wilson, II Roberts, 29 Minna & Oakl'd. 

Weber, John, 1717 Mason. 

Warrex. O P, corner Broadway and 

Telegraph av, Oakland. 
Williams, H, 03li Mission. 



WiLKras, T J, 815 Bnsh. 
Willey, Jack. 321 Sixth. 
White, SS,22i3 Larkin. 
Whltmore, D W, 601 Pine. 



•Has a diploma from the Quack Medical School ol Philadelphia, that 
sold them. 



. 



4 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 12. 



REPUBLICS AND THEIR PRESIDENTS. 

The weak point in the new French Constitution is neither the 
Assembly, although such a body in France is little likely to work easily 
with a second Chamber having equal claims with itself, nor the Senate, 
though the late intrigue has made it either a useless or a dangerous insti- 
tution, but the Presidency. It might have been thought that very recent 
experience would have impressed on Frenchmen what might be expected 
from such an office, but even more than Englishmen they are under the 
influence of associations with the Republic of the United States, and can 
not be brought to believe that any integral part of the American Consti- 
tution is incapable of being reproduced in other communities with the 
same results. Nevertheless the world has how had very considerable ex- 
perience of Republican Presidents, and there are materials enough for a 
trustworthy induction as to the probable conduct of this class of function- 
aries and the political value of their office. 

Lord Derby at Edinburgh very justly placed among his instances of pre- 
dictions signally falsified the boast of Canning that a new world would be 
called into existence in Spanish America to redress the balance of the old. 
The failure and discredit of all the Republican Governments in Mexico 
and in Central and South America, with the solitary exception of Chili, 
have incidentally put out of sight some very valuable political lessons 
which they may be made to yield. They have certainly shown that Re- 
publican institutions cannot save communities that have repudiated their 
past history from some of the worst evils of despotism, and from a good 
many evils besides, against which despotism is a protection ; but they 
have shown also that in the vast majority of Republics the chief source of 
bad government and civic strife is the Presidency. It has now been 
established, as the result of a great deal of experience easily open to ob- 
servation if anybody would be at the pains to observe, that Republican 
Presidents can only be brought with the greatest difficulty to resign their 
powers when their term is over, and that, if they have been forced to re- 
tire into private life, they are engaged in perpetual intrigues for the recov- 
ery of their public position. Republics grow into despotisms because 
Presidents grow into dictators ; civil war is constant because Presidents 
will always use their influence over the army to retain or regain the Presi- 
dency ; all political questions come to resolve themselves into questions 
about persons, because Presidents or ex-Presidents are recklessly ready to 
take any side or adopt any opinion for the sake of obtaining their personal 
objects. All these Republics are, in fact, overweighted by the Presidency, 
which is always on the point of crushing and disorganizing them. The 
significance of this fact is only not acknowledged because the history of 
the great Republic of the North is supposed to have proved that it is not 
necessary or universal. Yet the experience of the United States is of the 
nature of an exception that goes near to proving a rule. Whatever de- 
basement the institutions of the United States have undergone is attribut- 
able to the reluctance of American Presidents to abandon their office, and 
to their ambition for re-election. To this the Americans owe the miser- 
able doctrine that the spoils belong to the victors. Each new President 
weeds the Civil Service from one end to the other, expelling his political 
adversaries and replacing them by his political friends, because he must 
be surrounded by his own creatures who will labor at all cost to secure 
him a second term of office. In the United States, the disproportion is 
extreme between the efficiency of administration and the elaborateness of 
the machinery for securing it ; the American people is perpetually voting 
at some election or another, and is badly served for its pains and a good 
deal cheated. But the great cause of a disappointment of hope which, if 
tested by the language held by English Radicals fifty years ago, is scarcely 
less signal than the failure of Canning's prediction, is the reluctance of 
the President to go out of office. Nobody who has paid the least attention 
to General Grant's conduct and language can doubt that this unwillingness 
is in his case extraordinarily strong. It is a most sound instinct which 
leads Americans of all parties to protest in the strongest language against 
a third incumbency of the Presidential office by the same person ; never- 
theless President Grant in his anxiety for re-election may have possibly 
done an injury to American political life as deep as that inflicted by 
President Jackson's clearance of the Civil Service. For the first time in 
its history it seems likely that the Union will be distracted by a religious 
agitation, and that the immunity of the Americans from the most irritat- 
ing and hopelesB controversies of the old world has come to an end. And 
this new leaven of mischief they certainly owe to Presidential ambition. 

It has often been claimed for Constitutional Monarchy that it is the 
best expedient hitherto discovered for facilitating the devolution of the 
highest and most important office in any political system from one incum- 
bent to another. This, indeed, is not its only recommendation. For, how- 
ever much the real powers of a Constitutional King may be attenuated, he 
always attracts to the Government of which he is the theoretical chief, 
and which iB carried on in his name, a great deal of the instinctive and 
unconscious loyalty which is proved by a thousand instances to be quite 
as essential to the stability of political institutions as their wide popular- 
ity or proved beneficence. The true reasons why the Anglo-Americans 
have not suffered many evils which their institutions, taken by themselves, 
were calculated to produce, is that, by a singular exception in the history 
of modern Republics, they hava been able to attract to their country, 
which in reality is nothing more than an impersonal abstraction, much of 
the loyalty and affection which are elsewhere given to the personal Sover- 
eign who represents the country. Nevertheless, to all communities which 
have it, the chief value of Constitutional Monarchy is that it saves them 
from Presidents. It is true that M. Louis Blanc, with a small school at 
his back, has a theoretical specific for providing a Republic with this par- 
ticular advantage of Constitutional Monorchy. He would have no Presi- 
dent at all. But this remedy is not unlike the famous security for ascetic 
purity attributed to Origen. It would enervate any Goverment, but out 
of a country with administrative institutions like those of France it would 
take all vigor. Without some one deciding mind at the helm, the French 
ship of State would drift helplessly. The system of M. Louis Blanc was, 
indeed, formerly tried at a time when the present institutions of France 
were not fully matured. But the Directory is only not generally allowed 
to have been one of the weakest and most discreditable Governments, be- 
cause its vices were disguised by the splendor of the victories won by the 
generals who nominally obeyed it. But those generals well knew its im- 
becility, and were preparing its ruin. 

But, though if France is tn have a Republic, it must be a Republic with 



a President her situation is such as enormously to aggravate the perilous- 
ness of the office. Her actual President was named in a panic, and had 
his powers extended over a fixed period in a panic. His title to his powers 
is now derived from the institutions over which he presides, but is superior 
to them and of older date. He was expressly created to maintain order, 
whatever political arrangements might be made. And the causes thai, may 
lead to the disturbance of what the French call order are at work on all 
sides. There are no politicians so bitter as French politicians ; no parties 
so regardless of consequences as French parties. The passions which led to 
the Parisian insurrection are still quick and burning ; the liability of the 
country outside of Paris to fall into sudden paroxysms of terror is as 
strong as ever. And the instrument by which the blow can be struck 
whenever the pretext is given is perfectly ready for use ; for the army is 
still sore from defeat, and still mindful of its ascendency during the Second 
Empire. The Constitutional checks on the President are, moreover, singu- 
larly feeble ; for the Assembly has been matched with a rival power of 
popular origin, and the Senate has lost much of its authority before it 
meets, through the intrigue of last month. The simple truth is that the 
fate of all the institutions founded by the National Assembly is staked on 
the personal character of a professional soldier, who is a Duke of the Em- 
pire and President of the Republic which has grown out of its misfortunes. 
— Pall Mall Budget. 

T HH STATE OF TRADE. 

There seems to be a few signs that at length the depression in trade 
which began with the close of 1873 is, after a duration of more than two 
years, about to be relieved, in some degree, at least. The depression in 
this country has not been so general or so severe as in Germany, Austria, 
or the United States, or as regards 1875 in Canada. In France the de- 
pression has been far less than in any of the countries above named. In 
England the difficulty has arisen not from a dangerous failure of the har- 
vests and excessive railwav building as in 1847, nor from the collapse of 
wild financing as in 1866. The dullness of 1874-5 was in its origin more 
akin to the reaction from high prices which produced the panic iu October, 
1857. The same observation applies, but with greater emphasis, to the 
United States. In that country, "however, besides the causes which led to 
the high range of prices before September, 1873, we have to count with 
the effect of the excessive transfer of capital into railway building during 
the five or six years which preceded the collapse of the Pacific Railway, 
and the wholesale failures consequently begun by the fall of Jay Cooke & 
Co. Railway investment in the United States 1868-73 contributed largely 
to advancing prices, and especially to advancing wages, in that country. 
It also contributed in a marked degree to the same phenomena in this 
country, more particularly in the demand for iron and steel rails and other 
kinds of railway material. But in the United States there was the subtle, 
powerful, and pervading influence of a depreciated paper money and a pro- 
tectionist tariff. 

In Austria the great commercial activity of the years preceding 1873 
was the offspring of a multitude of concurrent causes. The final agree- 
ment of Hungary, the final loss of Italy, the final establishment of par- 
liamentary government, and the entry of Austrian policy, both political 
and commercial, upon a more enlightened career, all conduced to pro- 
mote new enterprises, and the enterprises were of course carried to excess, 
and no small part of them broke down. In Germany the same causes 
were at work as in Austria, but with the striking addition of the victories 
of 1870-1, and the French ransom which came pouring into the country in 
1871-2. 

With ourselves, undoubtedly, it was the sudden and vast demand for 
railway materials from Austria, Hungary, Russia, Germany, and the 
United States, which sprang up in the summer of 1871, that led to the re- 
markadle commercial excitement of that year and of the two following 
years, 1872 and 1873. The demand fell suddenly upon an article — coal — 
which was pre-eminently an article of prime necessity, and one the supply 
of which could not largely or hastily been increased. The traffic in coal 
exercised on prices in 1871-3 the effects which have been so often witnessed 
in the case of wheat after a marked failure of the harvest. The deficiency 
may be but relatively small, but the purchaser's fear of being left without 
an article of prime necessity carries the rise of prices far beyond the real 
necessities of the occasion. The same remarks apply less cogently to iron 
and all iron-working materials and appliances, and to the wages of all 
trades connected with that and kindred industries. Vast and sudden profits 
and rapidly increased wages in the coal and iron industries stimulated ex- 
penditure in all directions, until the cost of producing commodities of 
nearly all kinds reached a limit in the autumn beyond which the resources 
of the country could not cany it, and, what is more to the purpose, at 
which the resources of the country could not maintain it ; and therefore 
the only corrective was a process of decline. Now in commerce a process 
of decline means a succession of calamities. It means the failure of most 
of the sanguine people who have gone beyond their means, then the fail- 
ure of people who have trusted them, then the limitation of every outlay 
to the narrowest point, until buyers feel satisfied that prices will not fall 
lower. Concurrently with these measures of repression and restriction 
there is decreasing employment and wages, and decreasing activity in all 
the industries which are mainly kept in motion by the weekly expenditure 
of the earnings of the wage classes — an expenditure in its aggregate far ex- 
ceeding any other. 

It is this hard and exhausting process of decline which in this and other 
countries already named constitutes the real cause of the commercial de- 
pression of the last two years. In Austria and Germany the recovery will 
be slower than in England or the United States, for the simple reason 
that their resources of all kinds are less. In America, but for the depre- 
ciated paper money and the protectionist tariff, the recovery would have 
been more rapid, perhaps, than elsewhere — always, however, subject to 
the qualification that the country must first untertake the undue transfer 
of floating into fixed capital in the making of railways. 

It should be remembered that any approach to inflated prices is a great 
economic misfortune and a serious social danger. The essence of all sound 
progress is that every investment should yield a fair and secure income — 
that is to say, that it should be made at prices which are not likely to be 
less ; and if there are now any genuine symptons of revival in this country, 
it is because we have arrived, or are nearly arrived, at this safe level. 



Feb. 19. 



POSTS( RIPT TO THE >AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



In oountri . oatural rwoorow, ud h 

f\'-r\ period ul dull trade brinn intoad 

n i t li urantc ■ determined 

•c&rvli I r production ind a rv- 

'Ji.iilH'N ■•! .\.TV |H*IIJIY Wj'.'Ilt in 

and want. The itead made In the muter enfnneen igfttnat the unrea- 
hostilitT ol tli-' tr.t<!-' union-* t.» pi. i>* w.irk is a MM in point, hi 
thia country it is probable that the Mull trade of tin: last two yw 
helped to advance a lane pari ol tin- wage-earning rlnwioo to ;» correct on 
deratandlng "f what tueii d and cannot do for them, 

There must !*• tent ol thooanndi of working men who have disc 
tint it wm solely the brisk trade ol 1871 3 which gave them mon 
ami that H waa the doll trade <>f 1874 5 which mnl about their busmesa 
nio*t ol the workmen ol inferior skill and character. 

The exoMtice railway building in the United States, in Russia, and in 
Centra] Europe will aid largely in supporting trade both in the near and 
'v the more distent future. The wonderful advance ol this country 
after 1851 must In- traced bo the railway system achieved through the but- 
hring and lose entailed by the mania years 1845-6. The notion that the 
iron ami coal I I ui.imntly disabled because railway competition 

has arrived at its limit is one of those alarms which can hanlly In- treated 
with respect. Even DeaMmer steel rails wear out in about twelve years, 
ami the mere maintenance and renewal of the existing railway mileage of 
the world supposes an. annual production of railway material fully equal 
to existing means of supply. It is only within the last thirty years that 
Eastern, Southern, and Central Europe can be said to have entered thor- 
oughly into the commercial race, ami the same observation applies with 
greater emphasis to remoter regions, as. for example, South America, 
Australia, Southern Africa, Egypt, Japan, and China. The revolution 
in all or most of thesi iuinu' radical, and amounts to the adop- 

tion of entirely new theories of human life and the proper direction of 
human tabor. Instead of being content to satisfy a few simple wants by 
rude and painful means, the populations of vast regions have discovered in 
Commerce an easy means of satisfying many wants. Human life is no 
longer mainly devoted to waging wars or preparing to wage them, and to 
excluding foreigners or trying to exclude tnem ;.and hence it is, speaking 
in a broad sense, that we are warranted in regarding seasons of dull 
trade as the ebbs of an ocean so full and expansive that it cannot fail again 
to advance not only up to but beyond its former limits. — Pall Mall Bud- 

P*. 

rkOM OUR ANGLO-TRISKT CORRESPONDENT. 

Twtfoed, Berks., England, Jan. 18, 187*5. 
Dear F. N. L :— It is the very depth of Winter. Never was term more 
appropriate. Not a footstep to be heard on the streets ; the very carriage 
wheels are muffled in sni w, and people glide hither and thither like un- 
easy ghosts, and just as silently. Tne snow in its beauty, the snow in its 
angel purity is over everything. The houses are thatched in white ; it 
lies deep on fence and rail, and on the feathery trees, which are lovely 
with a loveliness that no Summer foliage could ever lend them. Not as 
much wind as to lift a single star from a snow-flake, and the sky is murky 
and leaden. We will feel glad when the short Winter's day wears to a 
clo.se, and we can gather round a roaring fire and indulge in old-fashioned 
talk, and sing old-fashioned songs, and crack our nuts and dream of auld 
lang syne. 

The storm without may roar and russle, 
We winna mind the storm a whussle. 

Apropos of your Newfoundland story in a recent number of the F. N. 
L., although I should be sorry if these noble animals should lose caste 
by anything I say, still I must inform you that they are not all Good 
Templars, not by a long chalk. I had a very beautiful bitch staying for a 
month or two with me lately, a daughter of the late Champion Cato. She 
wasn't long here until she informed me as plainly as she could that she 
had always been used to a little drop. " Confound her eyes, if ever I tries 
to rob a poor bitch of her beer." I allowed her one glass at mid-day, and 
one at supper, and at times a little whisky and water before she went to 
bed. There was a public-house she used to go to and help herself from 
under the tap. At times, when out for a long walk, I used to enter a 
hotel and call for two glasses of bitter, one for myself and one for Bessie. 
She was awfully fat, I suppose from the beer she drank, and used to be 
bilious of a morning. There was no good trying to wean her from it, 
because she would bolt into the nearest "pub.," and people encouraged 
her. I took her to Moody and Sankey's once, thinking she might hear a 
word in season, but I was refused admittance. If she had done anything 
funny when half drunk, I would not have grudged her the drop of beer, 
but never a thing did she do but sit on her broad end and insist upon 
Bhaking hands with you about ten times a minute. The silly bitch. 

There is a certain eminent divine not a hundred miles from the sweet 
smelling city of auld Reekie who is -not gifted with the fiery, burning 
eloquence which is so highly characteristic of the 'Frisky pulpit ; in fact, 
his sermons are allowed by every one to be very dry indeed. 

He was coming home by train the other day when he met a cattle dealer, 
who, having made a good market that day, was just a "wee bit sprung'." 
The man of beeves tried to ingratiate himself into the souls-salvator's 
favor, and thia is how he did it: "Man," he said, " ye dinna ken me, 
but I ken you, and indeed, sir, I can tell you, you're a weel-beloved man 
in your ain pairish. Everybody would gang sark alane to please ye. 
3 ang preachin" ; wha the decvil cares for tliat 7" Candid of the cattle dealer, 
but hardly comforting for the parson. 

Is it really true that you folks out in 'Frisky expect an European war 
this summer ? If it will comfort you, or whether or not, I may tell you 
that there isn't a ghost of a chance of any such thing, and I have this 
direct from one who ought to know. 

The divorce court and the " spelling bee " are becoming all the rage in 
this country. We owe you Yanks a lot. 

Prussian diet (sour kraut, I suppose,) opened yesterday. Austria is 
arming cap a pie — that's funny. Prince of Wales starts to-day for La- 
hone, and poor Lady Richard "Grosvenor is dead, only thirty years of age. 

That's about all the news I've got to give you. Oh ! by the bye, a 
Frenchman has given a private exhibition of his power of fugation. A 



friend "f mine wai there, Re tan the apnaral 

of all proportion t<- the weight sustained ; otherwise it was a i 

port, My friend is dreadfully taken with the idea, and says America 
must, took t<> bar laurels, 

1 frequently \i*ii my Mend and neighbor, Mortimer Coffins ; it would 
be an Insult t<i call him Mr. full ins, or < loDins, Baq. Yon know him, ol 
oouras Mortimer Collins, poet and novelist. Be bas a beautlfnl biiou 
residenee, almoal Italian in it* picturesqaeness, and he and his oharmlng 
wife live in a styla rural enough t.> hove pleased Horace himself. Like 

myself and all men m[ brain and soul ( ahem ! ) he i* very fond nf dogs, 

owls, white rats, and pete of every kind. 

lie likes the B\ N. L very much, and thinks it olaver. That says 
something for the F. N. 1.. anyhow, 

LATEST News, The Queen la well, and never misses a Sunday at 

church.— — IViner nf Walep at Delhi. Princess P.i-atrire mj<>yim/her- 

self skating.—— John Rrown at Osborne.— Prince Leopold done with 
( Kford and gone to live at Bovton Codfbrd, Wilts.— Viscount Ambarley 

died of bronchitis. Lord Derby In London.— Manpiis of Rroon at 

K'ln.' receivin-,' sacrament fi'om the Holy Father.— — Andrew MctVllun 
painting three soenes near Balmoral for the Queen. ^^Lord Napier, of 
Ma-dale, thrown fn>ui his horse amlbrokenhiscollarbone.— March i 
of Ciannoard dead. 



ARE THET^ QUACKS? 

11 When patients comes to I, 

I physics, bleed b and sweats "em ; 
Then, IT they choose to die, 
WhuL's that to I— 1 let's 'era." — I. Lettsom, 1770. 

Gentlemen, You Call Yourselves Doctors. Have You a Diplomat 



Allen, H. K., 

Anderson, R. C, 40S 3d and 7603tf Mis'n. 

Avechlga, Vincent, Green above K'rny. 

Burr, Acnes, 181 O'Purrell. 

Ibironidis, G. W.. 518 Green. 

tBartieit Mr?. A. W. M.. 29 O'Parrcll. 

JBlach, Carl, 514 Kearny. 

Cowan, Robert H., 207 Kearny. 

Clawson, J. W. C.. gone to Arizona. 

Chapman, C. B., 824 Montgomery. 

Ckooker, M. J. .821 Market. 

Curtis. Alvah, Oakland. 

Cobb, A. J.. 7th street, Oakland. 

Cornel), Ja*on L, 428 Kearny, 

Chtimberlain, B. A.. 700 Mission. 

Evon5, T. W., 473 7th st, Oakland. 

Eaton, E. B. 

Evory, A. P.. pat't nostrums, 608 M'ket. 

Flattbrt, Jonathan, Gov't House, 
Washington and SanBome. 

Pish, L. W., 100 Stockton. 

Gottscbalk, Mary, 015 Larkin. 

Hcndee, M. J., Mission and Third. 

Hobbs, — , Los Angeles. 

Hill, A. B., 137 Montgomery. 

Hill, R. B., on the wing. 

Holwig,Fricdrich,N.E. Polk & Jackson. 

Joscelyn, W. Robert, 118 Post. 

Joscelyn, Aldrich, 118 Post. 

Johnson, P. T., 104 Kearny. 

Krocholm, . 

Koon, J. M., Grayson, Cal. 

Lanszwecrt, Louis. 400 Fourth. 

Maxwell, , 114 Geary. 

Miliken, A, Redwood City. 

Mayer, H. E., " French " nostrnm ped- 
dler, 7 Geary. 

McBride, J. J., etc.. 534 Market. 

Moore, S., 31 Second, 



tMoore, D. C. N.E. Post & Kearny. 

t Moore, Ellen. South San Francisco. 

Preshaw, R. G., on the wing. 

Preshaw. Mra. S. G., on the wing. 

Piquet. E.,cor. Wash'n and Breoham P 1. 

Pratt, P., with "King of Pain." 

Percy, D., on the wing. 

Rutlet, J. H., nostrum peddler, 745 
Mission and 405 Kearny. 

Rone-. J. L., 220 Third. 

Rahngliatl, N., 819 Montgomery. 

Reed, Ambrose M., B'dwny &22d. O'kd. 

Renken, Henry, flth AB'dway, Oakland. 

Rider, Kred, 504 Bush. 

Steele, Emma, 500 Third. 

Sturman, Benj.. 040 Howard. 

tSmith, Barlow J., 635 California. 

Sncktzer, , traveling abont. 

SriNNEY, A. B., 11 Kesrny. 

Steinhart, P-, 426 Kearny. 

Simmons, alias Carl. 777 Market. 

Tirlemon, , 405 Kearny. 

Thomsen, N. L., 74 Fourth. 

Tm?k, Edw., Nucleus Hotel. 

tTrnesdcll, A. P., on the wing. 

•Van Den Bergh, J. P. P., Miasion be- 
low Third. 

Van Den Bergh, Albert. 

Vanden bergh. L. C, 716 Montgomery. 

Wood, Wm. II., 61 Second. 

Walker, Mart B., 110 Sixth. 

Woods, J. H., Li*k House. 

White, Elijah, 17 Third. 

Webher, R., 328 Kearny. 

Wolff, Max, graduate Sing Sing Prison 
419 East. 

Yeaton, George A., alias Henry Clay 
Wilkins, Bigamist, Wateonville. 

Young, J. C, OlSSacramento. 



Miller, J. A., Haywards. 

♦Claims a diploma i'rom the Qnack Medical School of Philadelphia, that sold them. 

tClaims diplomas from the Hygeio Therapeutic Water Cure College in New York. 

For Carl Blach's " qualifications," sec the News Letter of November 27lh. His 
name will be removed i'rom the above list a« soon as he bas the regular diploma. 



DELINQUENT POLL TAXES. 

Office or the Tax Collector of the City ami County of San 
Francisco, January 22, 1870. —Public notice is hereby given to all persons 
who have failed or neglected to pay the POLL TAX duo for 'the fiscal year 1875 70, 
that the same has become DELINQUENT, and been placed in mj hands for collec- 
tion, and if not paid on or before the FIRST MONDAY OP MARCH, will become a 
lien upon their property, and be collected as provided in Section :i,S00 of the Political 
Code. [Jan. 20. WM. FORD Tax Co lector. 

SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF SAN FBANCISC0, 
S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sansome Sts. 

CAPITAIi 92,000.000. 

This Company is nowopeti for the renting ol 'vaults and the 
transaction of all business connected with a, Safe Depository. Pamphlets giving 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the Company. Hours, 
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. September 18. 

TO THE OWNERS OF EEAL ESTATE. 

Persons owning Real Estate that has heretofore been as- 
sessed in the former owner's name are requested to appear personal or send 
their deeds to the Assessor's Office, IMMEDIATELY, and have the necessary changes 
made for next year's roll. The work on the Real Estate Roll will commence in a few 
days, after which it will be too late for any changes. 
Jan. 22. ALEXANDER BADLAM, City and County Assessor. 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL, SAN RAFAEL. 

The above namctl hotel will be opened to the public on or 
about the first of May. Parties desiring rooms for the season can make appli- 
cation for the same either by letter or to the undersigned at the hotel. 
April 24. SAMUEL HUBBARD, Proprietor. 

A. T. ELLIOTT, 
Cihip antl Grain Broker, 214 California street, San Fran- 
co Cisco. Hops a Specialty. Jan. 22. 



_ 



6 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 12. 



LOCAL DOTTENGS. 
^Wednesday's express train brought from New York 153 soldiers. 
They are en route for Arizona. ■ 0. A. Hickok has returned from the 
East with the trotting horse St. Julian, a fine bay gelding with a record 
of 2:22£.— — A Fair in aid of the French Church will be opened in Pacific 
Hall next Monday.— G. B. Karpel was acquitted on a charge of obtain- 
ing a $70 suit of clothes from William Kaiser under false representation. 
—The regular monthly meeting of the Church Union of San Francisco 
will be held on Monday evening next. ^— J. D. Parker, a stock broker, 
was arrested yesterday on a charge of embezzling mining stock from 
Frederick H. Red ward. —At a meeting of the Harbor Commissioners 
yesterday the rent of the bulkhead from La Rue's wharf to Market-street 
wharf was reduced from S100 to $75 per month.— A dispatch from Port 
Orford, Washington Territory, reports loss of schooner Harriet Rowe at 
that point. She was owned by Taylor &. Rowe, of this city, was valued 
at §7,000 and was uninsured. -^The friends of the boy Moore, who failed 
to secure his dificharge from the naval service, in the United States Circuit 
Court, are preparing a petition for his pardon.— The Directors of the 
California Rifle Association held another meeting Thursday.— Dr. 
Gerhard Rohlfs, the traveler, delivers a second lecture before the San 
Francisco Verein on his experiences in Africa.— The Russian steamer 
brig Siberia arrived, in port to-day, 35 days from Hakodadi, Japan, with 
J. M. Baker and V. N. Federly passengers.— A detachment of troops 
for Angel Island has arrived from the East under command of First 
Lieutenant James H. Spencer, Fourth U. S. Infantry.— The Collector 
of Port Townsend has been requested by telegraph to send a revenue 
cutter in search of the missing schooner Urania, which is considerably 
overdue from Kodiac.-^— The Silver King Gold and Silver Mining Com- 
pany incorporated to operate in the State of Nevada, with S10,000,000. 
The Directors are John C. Leconey, A A. Smith, A. H. Yeazell, N._ L. 
Sullivan and C. W. Lamar. -^— The original North Consolidated Virginia 
Mining Company incorporated with $10,500,000 capital, to operate in the 
State of Nevada.— -The Twin Peaks Mining Company incorporated to 
work in Gold Hill District, Nevada, with $10,000,000 capital.— Gustav 
Root and his "pal," Robert Schaacht, have been transferred to San 
Quentin.— — The election of Lieutenant-Colonel of the Second Regiment 
of Infantry, N. G. C, will take place next Tuesday night.— —James R. 
Herrick, a defaulting broker, has been missing since the 29th ultimo.— 
Three small fires called out the Department Thursday.— —The Central 
street-cars now run down Powell street to Market.-^A meeting of the 
British Benevolent Society was held Thursday.— —The Pacific Mail 
steamer Granada made the trip from this port to Honolulu in 7 days and 
16 hours.— D. H. Wheeler, C. Cattlet, V. Dalour and G. Gooding ar- 
rived in this city Thursday from Tahiti per brig Nautilus.-^— A Class 
Union has been organized by the senior students of the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of California.^— The annual meeting of the 
Photographic Art Association, for the election of officers, will be held on 
the evening of March 3d.— The Mary Belle Roberts arrived on Thursday 
from Honolulu, with Henry Webb, Henry Wiletz, three natives and two 
Chinese as passengers.— Rev. Dr. Strong, recently appointed to the pas- 
toral management of the Howard Presbyterian Church, preached his in- 
augural sermon last Sunday.— —Thursday one of the camels on exhibition 
at Woodward's Gardens gave birth to a calf. This is the third camel calf 
that has been born in these Gardens.— —Marian L., the wife of Louis 
French, committed suicide on Saturday in her house, at the corner of Six- 
teenth and Carolina streets, by taking a dose of morphine. —The fishing 
boat Tre Sorcella, Captain Bernard, with three men, was lost last Wednes- 
day week near the Farrallones on her way to San Francisco.— The 
drivers and stokers of the Fire Department want their pay raised from $75 
to §100 per month, and held a meeting to determine upon what steps to 
secure that change.-^— No damage has been done on the water front from 
the " sou'wester."— The agents of the British Insurance Companies are 
opposed to permitting any vessels, on which they have written risks, to 
touch at Pitcairn Island and discharge the goods donated to the Islanders 
by grateful San Franciscans.— One of the sailors belonging to the Donne 
Castle, named Leadbeater, fell from the royal masthead to the deck at 
noon, on Saturday, and was instantly killed.— Spi'ingbok, contrary to the 
prevailing impression, has not been sent East, but is now at the Ocean 
Beach track. The allegations made by Eastern sporting papers that the 
horse had been tampered with, is indignantly denied by those who are ac- 
quainted with Joe D aniels. 

FOREIGN DOTTINGS. 
The Spanish Carlists have assumed the offensive against the Alfonsist 
positions at Oyarsun.^— The story that a quantity of gunpowder had 
been discovered among the coals of a steamer at Antwerp is pronounced 
untrte.— Telegrams from Vienna declare the dispatch to the effect that 
Consuls at Mostar had received instructions to negotiate with the Insur- 
gents on the basis of Count Andrassy's proposals to be untrue.^— The 
Anglo -Egyptian Bank at Cairo has contracted to advance 810,000,000 to 
Egypt on the security of her crops, and also a loan of 37,000,000 to meet 
the Egyptian floating debt and nther charges. — —The firm of William 
Merry & Son, foreign provisiowmerchants and agents, 133 and 134 High 
street, Whitechapel, and in Southwark and Southampton, England, have 
failed. Their liabilities are placed at £90,000. ■ ■ Deputy Voisin has been 
appointed French Prefect of Police, in place of M. Renault, resigned. 
The Republican, M. Valentine, recently wrote a letter supporting M. 
Renault as a candidate for the Chamber of Deputies.— —A dispatch from 
Brussels says the Common Council of Antwerp has decided to invite 
Mr. Motley, the historian of the Dutch Republic, to be at historical fete 
in honor of the patriots of the sixteenth century. -—Wade, British Min- 
ister to China, has been Knighted. Prince Milan, while reviewing tbe 
Servian troops Friday, announced that the changed political situation 
made it necessary to send them to the frontier.— The Prince of Wales 
arrived Saturday at Poonah, East Indies, and had an enthusiastic recep- 
tion. It is doubtful whether he can visit madras, owing to the cholera 
?revailing in that Presidency. ^— A tidal wave ten feet high swept up 
'arret River, Somersetshire, England, Satin-day. The Bridgewater dock 
gates were burst and vessels broke from their moorings. '— The olive crop 
in South Europe is short, and oil is held at higher prices.— —The fortune 
of Verdi is put down at S400.000 ; that of Ristori at the same figure ; and 



that of Prima Donna Stoltz and Rossi at 8200,000 each.— The priests in 
the Basque provinces are said to be at present advising Don Carlos & Co. 
to make peace in conformity with instruction from Rome. ' The Con- 
servative reaction has apparently not subsided in England. Blackburn, 
formerly a Liberal constituency, has just returned a Conservative member 
to Parliament by an overwhelming majority.— — The Empress Eugenie 
recently discussed at Salzburg with the Queen Dowager of Sweden a pro- 
ject of marriage of Prince Louis Napoleon with a Swedish Princess. 
The Cologne Gazette remarks that the Swedish royal family has no Prin- 
cess suitable for the Prince, unless he desired to marry a lady twenty 
years older than himself. ^—Father Curci, of the Order of Jesuits, has 
sent to the Pope a new work developing the thesis that the Catholic 
Church should never seek an immediate triumph, but endeavor to obtain 
exaltation through suffering and persecution.— —A total of 3,050 horses 
were exported from Great Britain during the past year, of which 258 
were sent to Germany, 653 to Holland, 545 to Belgium, 1,238 to France, 
and 357 to other countries. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 



ROBERT HGNNEDT NliTTAIL, 

Consulting Surgeon and Physician. 
October 2. 317 Geary street. Office hour. 10 A.M. daily. 

A CARD. 

JH. Stallard, Physician. M.R., London; M.R.C.P., Lon- 
e don; M.R.C.S., England. Fjrmerly Physician to the Great Northern Hos- 
pital and St. George's Dispensary, London. S.E. corner of Post and Kearny, en- 
trance on Post. Office hours from 12 to 3. Special appointments at any hour. 

[Xovembei C] ___^_ __ 

DR. GEDRGE C. MATTHEWS, 

Licentiate Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland; I..R.C.P. 
and L.M., Edinburgh, lately Intern Rotunda Lving-In Hospital, Dublin. No. 
322 11th street, Oakland. Office Hours, 8 to 10 A.M., 1 to 2 p.m., 7 to 9 p.m. Dec. 1L 

DR. L. V. ENGLEHARD, 
Ofc}Q Kearny street, Consulting 1 Physician and Surgeon. 

«J.-**/«3 Specialties : Eye, Ear, Throat and Skin Diseases. Office Hours : 12$ to 
2J and 4i to 5J p.m. Nov. 20. 



H 



DOCTOR AKDREI 
as returned from Europe, and may be found at his office, 

over the Clay Street Savings Bank. ^^_^__ Dec 11. 



PHYSICIAN, SURGEON AND ACCOUCHEUR, 

J. J. AUERBACH, M.D-, 
March 13. 3104 Stockton street, San Francisco. 



D 



NOTICE. 
r. A. J. Bowie has resumed the practice of his profession. 

Office, 622 Clay street. Office Hours from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 27. 



N. MILLER, M.D., 
physician, Oakland. Office, 1004 Broadway ; Residence, 364 

Eighth street. October 2. 



DR. J. P. MO0KLAR. 

! Post street. Office Hours, 11 A.M. to 2 P.M. 



Oct. 16. 



NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, $15, 000,000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
wards of 56,750,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, S1.3S0.000. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L. BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 

BAGS, TENTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay and 114 Commercial Streets, 

Sax Francisco. [May 24. 

SHARP & ILOYD 

Have Removed their Offices to Rooms Sfos, 9, 10, 11, 13 and 
13 on the Second Floor, Nevada Block, Northwest Corner Pine and Montgom- 
ery streets. Entrance on Montgomery street ; also, on Pine. The Rooms are on 
Pine street side of the Building. Dec. IS. 

H. H. MOORE. 

Dealer in Books for Libraries. —A large assortment of fin* 
and rare books just received, and for sale at 609 Montgomery street, ncarMer- 
chant, San Francisco. Oct. 24. 

D. F. Hutchinqs. D. M. Dunne. J. Sanderson. 

PHQ2NIX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1850.— Hatchings «v Co., Oil and Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 617 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

WARNER'S SALOON, 
^VTorili Reach, on Meiggrs* "Wharf.— For Fancy Hogs of pure 

_i^( breed and Rare Birds from Australia, China, Japan, and New Zealand, and I 
all other parts of the world, go and see him. Take a drink. The cars will drop you at 
his door. J an. B. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 
"tt^Tholesale Auction House, 304 and 306 California street. 

T T Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. Cash advances on consign, 
ments. Dec. 14. 

REMOVAL. 

L. H. Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Mohris Newtoic. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and • 
Groceries, have removed to 204 and 200 California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. ■ 

B.F.Flint. Flint, Bixly & Co.] [J.Lee. D. W. Folgeh. 
A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Graders. Packers and Dealers in WOOl, corner of Hattery 
and Greenwich streets, San Francisco. Jan. 29. 



,K 



LI 



POSTSCUIPT TO THE 8AA FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



TOM AND GERALDLNE. 

\ mi^ht h*v« ddina 

i ■mi , 
do, ht would bill rod i)m would 
ilt 
l>ri«U' :uul l>ri'!'--i."iii in their wake ; 
tiutm-nciiiK HtV lieraMine i* Tommy's wife. 
Hm* vdoq the Durrtagv rows, follow tatarmJttanl 

Deer rod iupi Tom's an Irritating chap : 
'. fading in. ol ooniN) Court of Probata trad DItok 
8ep*nU'«l, toon it's pUln they •« both In love •gain, 
I in consist* 1 nt two regularly bill and 

But they'll l*>t their dreams be o'er never marry any more I— Fun. 

THE TOWN OF SANTA CLARA. 

Editor News Letter : Our town is I renaly blissful ! The 

Ikoti of narrow-fruage railroad is now completed from Dmn- 

r,.int to Alvuo, 'I'ti'' laborers are at work on the road 

had, between the hitter place and this, and before the month 

of May, the iron honw will be coursing over the way. The prin- 

sjpal offices and workshops will be located here, on Grant street, 

anil :\ little later on, the line will be extended southerly and 

ly to the Los Gates, Saratoga and Stevens' Creek sections, with :i 

Facilities will thus be i.'iveu to a region of 150,000 

teres of the finest land in California. The result will immediately be of 

great benefit to this town, as the entire tract lays mostly to the westward, 

and thus cannot possibly inure t» the benefit ox -San Jose, unless our peo- 

hil of their own interests. A few more men like Mr. 

Ken •■ "i" the Santa Clara Bank would, in a few years, make this place a 

rival of no mean pretensions to San Jose. Capital and brains are the only 

; speaking of these, it is sintrular that some of the San Fran- 

n 11 who possess Imth, and waste them on California street, do not 

Htrik<- out for some of the country towns like Santa Clara, and build up 

iring name and fortune for themselves, together with a more quiet 

and happy life. On the " street" they are but minnows among the Tri- 

ansplant them hither and they will do the country a benefit with a 

.nduu: self return. Why should they not rather be first in a 

small town than imbobodies in a big one ? 

This is p \r txa 'Jcncc the ministerial town of California, but the reader 

t imagine there are any prime ministers here. They are all of the 

old-fashioned thump-bible and pound-text class, who delight in winding 

up the " seventeenthly " with a benediction on the world generally, and 

one on His Holiness the Pope in particular — of such is charity ! You 

can get any Bchool of theology, with all the hairsplittings thrown 

in, by paying your money and taking your choice— hard shell, soft shell, 

an. I naif shell, provided you shell out. We can't even enjoy a dog fight 

unless two or three parsons are by to top off with a dogsology. 

Menlo Parkites recently attempted to capture our big college— 
which is the town pride — by alluring offers of a large tract of land and 
00 in coin, but the padres, with accustomed sense, refused the bribe, 
thinking that a college, like the broad-limbed oak, will not bear trans- 
planting, but thrives better on the manor born. By the way^ these black- 
robed gentlemen own a very pretty villa and vineyard out on Steven's 
. whither they retreat after the cares of the scholastic year and com- 
mencement day, and enjoy their otium cum dig, under their own vine and 
fig tree. They have a number of thrifty orange trees flourishing there, 
and I doubt not, if some enterprising cit. would make the attempt, we 
should not have to go to Los Angeles for this luscious fruit. One go-ahead 
fanner will plant several hundred coffee trees this year, so that will be 
another problem tested — let us hope successfully. 

Altogether, our town is in a fair way to progress, and we pride our- 
selves on its cosy little homes nestling in among the groves of Iocust- 
. ptus and cypress, with the old Castilian and white cluster roses 
climbing lazily over arches and cottages. We have nicer and longer 
drives than any other town, and our streets are all fringed with shade 
trees. Educational facilities are good, and we are within two hours of 
Frisco. There is no disgusting Chinese quarter. Shall I add more ? 
Well, no ; perhaps some of you city people will pay us a visit when you 
are doing Saratoga. In that case, we shan't fleece you much. There ! 
Santa Clara, February 5, 1876. Qoenedl 

How beautifully Nature has adapted her means to ends ! How 
tenderly she provides for the wants of the humblest of her creatures ! Bar- 
win says that male grasshoppers use their hind legs to fiddle on the edge 
of their wings, and that the best fiddler first succeeds in fascinating 
the females. Behold how the industrious spider spins her web, and then 
masticates her husband and flings his carcass out in the back yard. Thus 
it is that the harmonies of life swell the grand diapason of the universe, 
as it were. 

American ingenuity is exhausting itself to supply attractions for the 
American Centennial. Twice a week, during the progress of the festival, 
George Washington Childs, the American poet-laureate, will be drawn 
about the grounds mounted on a catafalque. The committee are already 
preparing a superb gold medal to present to De La Montanya (Jackson, 
below Battery streets), as an award for keeping the finest and cheapest 
stock of Btoves and hardware on the Pacific Coast. 



John Guthrie, proprietor of the Sonoma Ranch in Grass Valley, de- 
termined to rid the vicinity of the pests which destroyed acres of grain and 
vegetables for him last season, provided ammunition and provision for a 
raid on the jackass rabbits, the other day, and ten guns were mustered 
into service, and the hunt continued four days, in which time 856 rabbits 
were slaughtered. Over 3,000 have been slaughtered on the ranch since 
July. 

Nailed. — Stuart Robson, the actor, is said to have a habit of biting his 
finger nails. He also has a small daughter. The other day that dear 
child deliberately pared her finger nails and in the innocence of her heart 
approached her comical progenitor. " Papa," said she, "here are some 
nails for you to eat." Tableau de famille ! 



TELEGRAPHIC DOTTTNGS. 
EdwardWelstedp-n.li.,) In .,- Granito Bpringi, Marl 

.My. ■ few days ago, Ths Been tarj of State at H 

■'■ nine propo its the laws Into Spanfah, the | 

i Mosnta p<-r folio, Ths town of Dixon, which re- 

cently talked ol incorporating, situ carefully counting the oost an I 
paring it with the advantages to be gained, has oonuluaed it wouldn't pay. 
— •Doo, Conlan, who recently assaulted Harry Barton, ■ one-armed 

L oonduotor, for ejecting him from hii train, has been sent tojai] 
for four months.— K. A. Clifford, formerly of Btockton but now of Tux- 
tock, Stanislaus county, has Bled hi* petition in bankruptcy, with liabili- 

134,472, and assets at about one-fourth that amount. Samuel 

Guthrie and Augustus H. Boyden were yesterday appomtedgaugers for 
the First District of Columbia. *-~The old estabushea iron firm of Per- 
rier fi Co., Montreal, have suspended. Liabilitii-w, si.muhni. ( ; JIV 4 (' ( ,. t 
hardware dealers, have also suspended; liabilities, 9100,000.^— Toe I aj 
tarlan Society of New Brighton. Staten bland, has subscribed 9600 
towards paying the debt of the unitarian Society of Santa ( Vuz.— — A 
postal treaty by the United States and Japan agree that the rate of letter 
postage shall be 6ve cente. and two cents upon newspapers not exceeding 
two ounces in weight. The cew arrangement will oome into operation on 
the first of April U'-xt.^— Preparations ore on foot at OeiTO Gordo to 
Btart up the suspended smelting works at that place. —lollops Awat 
and Mora were passengers on the steamer Senator from Santa Monica to 
San Francisco Thursday.^— Snrrocco has recently sold a gravel claim, 
embracing eighty acres near Volcano, to San Francisco capitalists for 
$7,000.— —Mr. Wiley of Los Angeles is matched to shoot a pigeon match 
with an up-country marksman, at Santa Monica, for $500 a mile. ^— John 
Wesley, San Joaquin County Clerk elect, slaughtered four hogs last week 
which weighed, dressed, l,65o pounds, an average of 414 pounds each,""— 
James Turner was thrown from his horse at Colusa last week, breaking 
his right leg, and while in this condition was robbed of S29 by John Rey- 
nolds, who was afterwards arrested. — Alice Adams, the infant daughter 
of A. J. Adams of Truckee, was burned to death last Thursday, by its 
clothes taking tire.^^Miss Hobart, a Massachusetts girl who recently 
purchased twenty acres of land in Westminster, is putting out ten 
acres of onions, and will soon sink an artesian well on the plnee.^— 
A Denver minister can lift 1,100 pounds with comparative ease. ^— Sam- 
pling works are to be established at Cation City, Colorado, within 60 days. 
— —The track of the Pueblo and Arkansas Valley Railroad has been laid 
within twenty miles of Puebla, Colorado.— —It is an ill wind that blows 
nobody any good, and the Cheyenne merchants are reaping a substantial 
harvest from the mining excitement, if nobody else does. ^— A Cheyenne 
grocery house has received a letter from Philadelphia, inquiring as to pro- 
visioning a thousand men, who expect to leave there shortly for the Black 
Hills via Cheyenne.— Though a constitution for the new State of Colo- 
rado is not yet complete, a league is being formed at Denver, with the 
view of making William N. Byers Governor — a nomination which, it is 
thought, would receive strong support.— The Ophir mine, at George- 
town, Gilpin county, Colorado, has been sunk to a depth of 1,000 feet, 
making it one of the deepest, if not the deepest, shafts in the whole Ter- 
ritory. ^^The new Sunday law for New Mexico provides that no person 
shall engage in any game or sport, horse racing, dancing or cock-fighting, 
nor sell liquor or any kind of merchandise, nor attend any place of public 
amusement.— ^Richard Kenner, the murderer of Jack Whitney, in Ken- 
tucky, is now being tried for the crime at Red Bluff. Peter Hall, his ac- 
complice, was convicted last week, and sentenced to life imprisonment. 
— — John Lowley has sold his ranch in Berryessa Valley to A. Clark, a 
prominent grain raiser, for S80.000. The preliminary examination of 
Stephen Baker at Red Bluff, charged with killing Moses Robinson, the 

seducer of his wife, came off on Saturday. William Moore, who was 

shot by John C. Brecknell, near Pea Ridge, Mariposa county, some time 
ago, has died of his wounds. 

A Frenchman roasts coffee, grinds it to flour, moistens it slightly, 
mixes in it twice its weight of powdered white sugar, and then presses it 
into tablets. One of these tablets can be dissolved at anytime in hot or 
cold water, making at once the very perfection of coffee ; and it is claimed 
that a pound of the berry will go much further by this than by any other 
preparation of the beverage. 



MKTAL6. 

Pig Iron, Scotch, No, 1... 
Bar Iron, assorted, V ft.. 
Metal Sheathing,? ft.... 
Tin Plates, 1 C, 9 box... 
Tin Plates, I X,8box... 

Lead, Pig, V ft 

Lead, Sheet. '# ft 

BancaTin,? lb 

Quicksilver 

COAL. 

WeBt Hartley,? ton 

A uatralian 

Cumberland 

Anthracite 

Belllngtmni Bay 

Mount Diablo 

COFPBE. 

Guatemala, ? ft 

Java. Old Government.. 

Manila 

Costa Rica 

RICE 

China, No. 1, ? ft _ 

China, No. 2 

Hawaiian 

wixES. 
Champagne,? doz... ... 

Port, accordlngto brand, 

? gallon 

Sherry, do. do 

OIL. 

Coal and Kerosene 



PBIOKS. 

*30 00 @ Si 5i 

— 3 @- 3^ 

— 20 @ — 22 
10 50 @ 

9 60 @ 

— c @— ay. 
@ — iu 

— 25 ® — 26 

— 60 @ — 

10 on @ 11 O'i 

10 00 ® 10 50 

18 J @ 22 00 

14 00 @ 16 00 

3 50 @ 

6 25 © 8 50 

@— 21 



— 28 ®- 

— 21 @ - 

— 21 @- 

— 6 @- 

— 5 ®- 

— 7 ®- 



1 75 @ 7 00 
— 25 ia — SO 



TEAS. 

Japans 

Oolong 

SUGARS. 

China, No. 1,? lb 

Sandwich Island 

Manila 

Crushed, American 

Muscovado 

Peruvian 

CANDLES. 

Sperm Wax, B ft 

Adamantiue 

SPIRITUOUS L1QUOBS. 

Whisky, Aim-i lean 

Whisky, Sm tuli 

Wnlefcy Irish 

Alcohol, American 

Rum , Jamaica , 

Brandy, French 

BAGS AND BAGGING. 

Chicken Gunnies, 

Gunny BagR In bales 

Burlap Bags 

Hessian. 40-Inch, ? yard 

DOMESTIC STAPLES. 
Wool, f ft 

Tallow 

Hides 

Wheat,!? 100 fta 

Barley 

Oata 

Flour.? 11)6 fts 



ART ASSOCIATION. 
Bierstadt's "Sunset on the Headwaters of the Green River," Wyoming. 

LATEST PRICES OF IMPORT AND EXPORT STAPLES. 



PEICES. 

$— £0 @ — 50 

— 45 @ — 5o 

— 9 @ — 10M 

— 8 ® — 11 

— 7 ®- 7« 

— 12 & — 12'a 

— 6 @— 7 

— 8 @— 9 

_ SO ® — 42 

— 12>i@ - 17K 

2 25 @ 5 50 

5 00 @ 5 50 

5 00 @ 5 50 

2 25 @ 2 40 

4 50 @ 5 25 

4 00 @ 10 00 

— 16 @- 17 



9 @- 



17 



7 &- IX 

-13 ®— 15 

1 7.5 @ 1 95 

1 25 @ 1 31 

2 00 @ 2 25 
4 50 m 6 00 



OFFICES OF AERIAL STEAM NAVIGATION CO., 

Jan. 4. No. C07 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco. 



POSTSCRIPT TO THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 5. 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Recorded in the City and County of San Francisco, California, for the 
Week ending February 10, 1876. 

Compiled from the Records of the Mercantile Agency of John McKiUop & Co., 
317 California Street, Han Francisco. 

Friday, February 4th. 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



Ctaaa V Stuart to Jno Davidson. . . 

Michael Lynch to Jas Kennedy 

H A Crane to V G de Montealegre 
HeDry Windle to Henry Winkle Jr 

J S Hand to Jas Ambrose 

Job Alexander to Bernard Nathan. 

B Nathan to Deborah Nalban 

H F Shepardsoo to E G Lyoos 

H Winkle to Jos Gutberlet 

Wm Pierson et al to D W Brown . 

Jas Blake to Thos D Staart 

F Fllzpatrick to H Newman 

Rudolf Jordan to Joe Frank 

H M Heuston to Isaack Kohn 

ThoB Magee to City and Co S F 

Margaret O'Rorke to Thos Farrell 

Jno C Postz to Job Roth 

Levi Parsons to G Uaskell 



DESCRIPTION. 



Eliza Wallace to Lizzie Foley.. 

Wm HoIMb to M Kavanngh 

Jas S Porteous to Wm M Fletcher 
Wm M Fletcher to John H Dooley 

Chas Lux to same 

Same to same 

M S Bates to Harrison Barto 

P 8 Mullen to Mary E Hagar 

F E Luty to Jas Ambrose 

B Nathan to H M Heineman 

Mary R Daly to Thos W Brennan . 
C H Reynolds to H F W Hoffman . 



C Murphy to Jas Walsh 

John Hinkel to Alex Bigger.. 



W Appleby to Wm Hollis.. 



Mary Mitchel to O Meuesini . 

S F Sinclair to same 

CB WyatttoB J Shay 



Portion Portrero Nueva blks 11 and 16. 

N nth, 175 e Dolores. 25x115 

N Sutter, 156:6 w Powel !. 25x137:6 

Lots 45 and 46, Silver Ter Homestead. . 

Lots 6 and 7, blk 12, Noe Garden Hd . . . 

S Post, 82:6 e Gough, 65x120 

Same 

S Post, 154:7 e Laguna, 15:10x120 

Lot 1. Silver Terrace Tract 

Undivided one-half of 50-vara 1,207... 

Ne Nevada, 1S5 nw Harrison, 27x68:9 .. 

N 21st, 142 w Guerrero, 25x1 14 

Sw Suiter and Taylor, 137:6x68:9 

Polk w,42n Pine, 95:6x85 

Com 184:6 w Polk, and 157:6 n Vallejo, 
etc, for public street 

Se Bush and Gou^h, 27:6x120 

S Oak, 110:6 e Gough, 27x71 

Sw Guerrero and Columbia, 51:6x105; 
also S Columbia, 105 w of Guerrero, 
300x114 

Jones, 40 b Vallejo, 8 20xGS:6 

S 21st, 325 e Guerrero. 25x114 

Ne Tyler and Pierce, 25x100 

Ne Tyler and Pierce, 65x100 

Lot 7, blk 45, Excelsior U'd 

Lot 8, blk 45, same 

E Ellen, 175 s 25th, 50x125 

S B'dwny, 45:10 e Gough, 22: 11x102:6. . . . 

W Sanchez, 114 3 21st, 57x105 

S Bush, 192:6 e Gough, 42:3x120 

Se Wash'n and Polk, 137:6x137: : 

Lots 9, 20, 29, 40, 50, 59, 67, 75, 87, of the 
Snooke Ranch 

N Glover, 229:6 w Jones, 23x60 

N Cal'a ave, at se cor of Precita Valley 
lot No 106. w 25, n 100, etc 

9KUB 66, b'd by 21st, Valencia, Mis- 
sion, and on n by a line parallel with 
21st, and 260 n from it 

N Teleg'h pi, 154:8if eDupont, 17:2!«x46 

Same 

N Pine, 137:6 w Pierce, w 137:6x137:6, 
re- record 



PRICE 



5 
5 

12,500 

600 

800 

10.000 

Gift 

6 

350 

2,000 

800 

1,500 

28,335 

19,250 



1 
!,500 



1,600 

1,200 

3,000 

7,000 

5 

5 

850 

5,000 

500 

6,500 

1 

1 
2,000 



6.000 

2,000 

10 



Saturday, February 5th. 



H L Nelson to F L A Pioche I Blocks 65, 63, 62, Horner's Addition... 

AT Green to Stephen H Merritt...|Se Natoma, 100 sw 2d, 20x80 

ThosN Wand to J E McDonald.. I Clara Ave w, 224 n 18th, 56x136 

Susanna Scholl to Henry Smith... I N Post, 73:6 e Dupont, 23x73:6 

Carl Mayer to Wendelin Mayer lESteiner, 96 a Walter, 24x81:3 

CB Moore etal to L H York |S Bush, at ne cor land of Cath V Hem- 

I mingway, lc.7:6xl37:6 

F P Belcher to Geo McCtlllough ... S Caroline Place. 87:6 e Powell, 25x50.. 

Tide Land Comre to Tim Norton.. Shot well, 100 s 17th. 25x122:6 

A J Moon to W Vare |M B 22, subj to mortg for $75,000 

Wm Ware to William Hollis jNw Ridley and Valencia; also e Guer- 
rero, 275 n Ridley, e 160, n Market, sw 

to Guerrero, etc 

JnoR Jacobs et al to same | Valencia w.loos lo Hermann, 50x8C... 

W Williams tr> W Burditt J Washington, 51:10 e Dupont, 25X76:6. 

J D nasebnlt to Julius Lyons etal. E Laguna, 133:4 s Greenwich, 26:8x62:6 

Micbl Con Ion to Cath Conlon 'Ne Tyler and Franklin , 68:9x50 

J S Alemany to Jno Kelleher IN Saint Roses, 115 e Ferrie, e 25x100... 

Juo Archbald to Mary McKenna. . ISe Natoma, 325 sw 7th, 25x75 

E L Snllivan to E F Ohm ISeStanyan and Carl. 275x220:10 

Sav and Ln Soc'y to Jas C CollinslLols 5 and 6, und sub 3 in lot 4, blk 391 

I Hunter Tract 

Clark Churchill to U J Hussey lEFolsom,152 n24tb, 26x100 

Geo H Wells to J H Poblker IS Powell Ave, 225 e Mission, 25x100..., 

JnoE Goble to Tbos Keefe !Sw Holyoke and Mansell, w 217, s, etc 

Jno Archbald to Mary A Ritchie. . ISe Natoma, 495 sw 7th, bw 25x75 



Monday, February 7th. 



David Poole to Edwin Harris INe Fillmore and Broadway, e 68:9, n etc 

Cbas D Olds to Daniel Rogers ISundry properties in west portion city. 

Jno Gardner to James Lyons :N Camp, 110:6 e Guerrero, 26x99:4 

August Hemme to Simon Glazier. Nw Franklin and Post. 54x120 

Mark & 14tb St Hd Asn lo J Gibb.lN 15th, 75 w Church, 25x100 

SametoEmile Flubacher IN 15th, 25 e Church, 25x110 

Same to AdolphusRuol 'S Mth, 25 w Landers, 25x110 

Jno E Rugglee to Pat'k J Collins. .IN 23d, 203:7 w Sanchez, 50:11x114 

Bank of San Francisco to C Leek.lLofc 6 blk 19, University Hd 

Leopold Eies loMrsEC HenkeniuslLota 16 to 21, block 181,1 to 3, blk 169 of 

O'Neil & Haley Tract 

Mar &14lh St Hd Asn to A Holmes S 15th, 50 w Church, 75x100 __ 

SiDg Man to Chay Yime IN Sacramento. 115:10 e Kearny, 21:8x60 

Celia C Calhoun to Daniel Murphy ILol 10 blk L, R R Homestead 

Amos Mecartney to Stefana CuneojE Powell, 69:6 n Greenwich, n 24, etc.. . 
Mas Cem ABn to Oc Lodg F & A Misandry lots in Masonic Cemetery 

.Inn AfphhHld to .Tni M Mnrrv NlV Natoma, 300 SW 7th, 50x75 

Nw Howard, 400 sw 7th, 25x90 

Nw Natoma, 375 sw 7th , 25x75 

Same 

E Valencia, 210 8 18lh, 50x160 

Same 

S Duncau, 101:10 e Douglas, e 152:9x114 
also, n Clipper, 203:8 e Church. 50x114 

S O'Farrell, 100 w Po,k, 37:6x120 

Jessie w, 151 s20lh. 22x75 

Se Natoma, 425 sw 7th, 25x75 

Sw9th. 25 nw Bryant, 25x100 

Portion lot No 1,357 Laurel HitlCem... 
Nw Natoma, 457 sw 7th, 25x75 



Jno Archbald to Jos M Marcy. 

Same to A Borella and wife 

Jno Archbald lo Edward Barrett. 

Same to James Young 

Wm H Brown to Michael Maguire 

Willows Land Assn to same 

Peter Dean to Geo H Parker 



Same to Jno Bridement 

W Hollis :o Rosaline EMcConnell 

J Archibald to Daniel Lydon 

M Dore to Francis McLaughlin 

Caroline B Hoff to W H Cook.... 
Jno Archbald lo Jno Hurley 



$ 500 

4,500 

1,2 

50 

900 

12,000 
800 



155000 
7,000 
3,000 
2,110 
7,500 
300 
1,500 
9,000 

1,407 
3,0(0 
2,600 
1,000 
1,550 



11,000 

1 

3,500 

24,000 

1.665 

1,350 

1,665 

800 

3511 



4,470 

1 

5 

80 

457 

3,200 

4,150 

1,575 



5,050 

925 
7,500 
3,250 
1,550 
2,100 
1 
1,650 



Tuesday, February 8th. 



GRANTOR TO GRANTEE. 



DESCRIPTION. 



Jno Archbald to Daniel Sullivan . . Se Natoma, 430 bw 7th, 25x75 

Same to Wm Moran Se Natoma, 400 sw 7th, 25x75 

Same to Patrick Foley |Nw Natoma, 500 Bw7th, 25x75 

David A Fraser to Wm R Fraser.. Undiv a Whitney. 80 n Randall, w etc. 

Alvinza Hay ward toYMC Assn. N Suiter, 137:6 e Dupont, 54:6x120 

Mary Daly to Rosa Hogan Laguna w. 137:6 n O'Farrell. 21:6x137:6. 

Chas Sbimmins toMariaSbimminslSe Mission, 175 sw 8th, 25x80 ; also, ne 
I 10th Ave, 100 nw F, 125x100, blk 191, 

SSFHd&RRAssn 

Maria Sbimmins to R H Lloyd Same 

J Baldwin to MJRiley IE Florida, 100 n Butte, n42xl00... 

Dennis D Hayes to Jno F Schroder; E Church. 104 n 22d, 26x125 

Jno Archbald to Jno Jack Nw Natoma, 450 sw 7th, 25x76 

Same to Robt Whitlen Se Natoma, 300 ew 7th, 25x75 

Same to Adolph Shirek Nw Howard, 300 8w 7fh, 50x90 .... 

Same to Waller Hoge Same 

Same to Rfenzi Hughes Se Natoma, 275 sw 7th, 25x75 

JnoJJobnson toJnoSkae Lots 13 to 18, blk 876, Tide Lands, 

Jno M Tnlly to Mary O Tally Mission w, 130 u 24th, etc 



Mar & 14th St Hd Asn to L Corthay 

Same lo Jean B Delocbe 

Louis Slosa to Solomon Levy 

Mar & 14th St Hd Asn to C Christin 

A N Brown to S W Holladay 

PG Partridge to same 

Samuel W Holladay to W Lennoo 

Same to B C Benson 

Same to Edward Kelly 

Same to Jno Allen 



Nw Market, 142 sw Reservoir, 25x100. 

Nw Market, sw Reservoir, etc 

N Geary, 103:1 e Webster. 34:4x137:6 

Nw Market, 117 sw Reservoir, 25xlU0 

50-vara 934, nw Bay and Hyde 

Same 

N Bay,91:S w Hyde, w 22:11x125 

N Bay, 114:7 w Hyde, 22:11x137:6,... 

N Bay, 68:9 w Hyde, 22:11x125 

Nw Bay aud Hyde, 68:9x125 



$1,550 

1,550 

1,625 

850 

1 

1,500 

10 
10 

2,000 
500 
1.000 
1,500 
9,000 
9,000 
1,600 
400 

1,940 
2,290 
2.375 
2,015 



850 

800 

2,890 



Wednesday, February 9th. 



George S Sawver to Charles Stein. 

Robt Stein to Cath G Sheldon 

Benj Richurdson to Timothy Lynch 

O F Cem Assn to W Lukens 

Dom Castagnet to Rachel M Ashim 
Pi Lob Av Hd Assn to H Moserove 
Wm Hollis to Vital Reger. 
A McLane to Pat McAran 



Lo:? 512 to 515, Gilt Map 3.. 



Sw Hvde and O'Farrel, 87:0x25 

Ne Decatur, ISO se Bryant, se 30x50 

Lot 9. Walhalla Dell sect plot 3, O F C. 

N Geary, 120 e Dupont, 17:6x60 

Lots 35 and 36, blk 042. Pt Lob Av Hd.. 

E Jessie, 172s SOlli, 22x75 

Com on n line Presidio road, 200x60, etc 

H Beodel et al to Jno Bays IE Bush and Pierce, 55x200 

Samuel Lewis lo Solomon Gump.. N Sutler, 08:9 e Oclavia, e 68:9x120 

H Marshall to Lizzie Donahue .. E Jessie, 185 n 18lh, 25x80 

E Chielovicb to Tbco J Robinette.lLot45, blk 297, Pleasant Valley Hd 

Jno Archbald to Margaret Alex Nw Natoma, 350 sw 7th, 25x75 

Samuel Crim to Anna M Daffy IE Capp, 212:6 n 22d, 30x122:6 

J M Shotwell to Henry Koerber..,N Fulton, 137:6 w Laguna, 55x120 

Wm Hollis to Jos H Middlelon. . . . IE York, 146 s 24th, 23X100 

Same to Jas Jos Colvin IE Jessie, 150 s 20th, 22x75 

Geo H Parker to Wm Winter ILots3, 4, 5, block 5, Junction Hd; also, 

lot w blk 61, Terminus Hd 

Chas PSeeley to Thos Farmer N 17th, 275 e Dolores, 25x115 

Margaret Kane to Wm Heins Is Bay, 123 w Van Ness, 211-9x137:6 

Gibson McConnell to JnoSimmonBlN Lincoln, 91:8 e Jones, 22:11x60 

Elijah Case to H H Deckmaun I Lots 17 and 18, blk 307, South San Fran 

Jno A Wills lo Wm J Wills Und w cor 5th and Brannan, 275x275... 

Wm Hollis to Chas B Preble li Jessie, 12S s 20th , 22x75 

Wm H Taylor to TTiiompsou....lS Eddy, 137:6 w Scott, 68:9x137:6 

Sav & Loan Soc to Patrick Taaffe. |Sw 1st, 100 se Folsom, 20x72. . 



H A Mickey to Jacob Bar. 
Samuel F Sinclair to E W Burr. 
C W Ormsby to N P Sheldon . . . 



N 10th Ave. 250 w M, 25x100 
S Clay, 43:9 e Dupont, 25x68:9. . 
Block 23, bounded by Market, Valencia 
and Harmon 



( 700 
13,250 

750 

84 

1,250 

700 
3,275 
2,144 
2.S50 
7,250 

900 

250 
1,600 
1.800 
5,500 
3,400 
3,035 

1,500 
1,800 
1,013 
1,350 
2,000 
25,920 
3,119 
3.590 
4,700 



Thursday, February 10th. 



Sam'l nancock to Sivert Johnson . 
E D Keyes to Wiuficld S KeyeB ... 
Hervey Sparks to J M Lucas, Jr.. 
F M Eckert lo Ellz'th Plcilt'er . 



TLCom'ratoEWinslow ILots 10, 11, 12, blk 427. Tide Lands 

M'kt & 14th StH As'n to M Gray .|Nw Church and 15th, 100x25; also, s 

I 14th, 330 e Sanchez, e88:10?4, etc 

|Se Oak and Buchanan. 37:6x120 

sN Cal'a, 43:6 e Front, 44x68 

I Und 3 acres, Riplev Tract 

,S Post, 154:7 e Laguna, 25:10x120 

John Archbald to J T McCormick|Se Natoma, 525 sw 7th, 25x75 

M Sbimmins to Chas Shimmius... Se Mission, 200 swSlli, 25x80; also, ne 

| 10th av, 75 nw F, nw 25, etc 

LS Welton to G H Stanyan IS Bush, 137:6 w Laguna, 25x137:6 

Masonic Cem As'n to S E Loomis.|Lo: 22, sec 21, N A Masonic Cemetery.. 

Win Hollis to E P Baker IE Jessie, 85 s 20lh, 21x75 

John Hinkel to Bridget McKenDa .Lot 1,463, G ; 't Map 3 

J C Duncan to Sarah Kelly [Lot 28, blk 25, City Land Ass'n 

M kt 0; 14tU St H to C Groezinger.lNw Market, 167 sw Reservoir, 25x100 .. 

John Archbald to H Herzfelder ...'Nw Natoma, 525 sw7ih, 25x75 

Hamilton Berry to E Thompson ...|Lot 19, bik 33, Fairmouut 

M'kt& 14th StH As'n to J Shirley S Reservoir, 90 e Church, e 88:9, etc 

C Churchill toH J Maack iWTreatav, 178 u 21th, 26x100 

J Valentine to Sam'l L Stnuley..'E Hyde, 50 8 Clay, 37x112:0 : 



$1,426 

3,130 
5,000 
1 
160 
7,175 
1,575 

10 
1 

102 
3,800 

225 

90 

1,040 

1,625 

400 
1.600 
2,500 
5,500 



BBIT1SH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 



relating to the Society. 
Oct. 23. 



J. P. McCURRIE, Secretary. 

730 Montgomery street. 



STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October 19CA, 1675.] 

Sure death to Squirrels, Rats, Gophers, etc. For sale by all 
Druggists, Grocers and General Dealers. Price, 81 per box. Made by JAMES 
G. STEELE & CO., San Francisco, Cal. Liberal discount to the Trade, Aug. 21. 

ELLIS BEAD, 
SHIPPING AND (OIDIISMOX MERCHANT, 
June 12.] 310 Clay Street San Francisco. 

CASTLE BROTHERS.— [Established, 1850.] 
Tmporters of Teas and East India Goods, Kos. 213 and 215 



Front street, San Francisco. 



CONCENTRATED GBEEN TURTLE. 
put up in cans of 2 1-2 Pounds aud warranted to keep 

sale by RjDHEUS, MEYER & CO. 



For 

November 27. 



F 



NOTICE. 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley A Rnlofson's,. 

in tin Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct. 29.. 



fho Special and Authorized Organ of the ^rlal Steam Navigation Co. --Fred. Marriott. Patentee. 



Prio. p.r Copy. 1A Cuta.1 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1SAU. 



[Annual Snbaoription (In cold', CIJM. 







DEVOTED TO THE LEADING INTERESTS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Vol. 26. 



SAN FEANOISOO. SATUBDAY, FEB. 19, 1876. 



No, 4. 



Office* of the San r'ranrl«eo News I.eilor, California China 
Mall. California Mall Bay, South side Merchant stroot, No. 607 
to 615, San Fmndaco. 

GOLD r..VIlS-890@900— SilvebB.vrs-S<S12 $ cent disc. Treasury 
Notes are soiling at — (S — » Mexican Dollars, 5@7 $ cent. disc. 
Trade Dollars, 3A<§4£ per cent, discount, 



*B" Exchange on New York, $(35 — per cent, for Gold; Currency, 12i 
percent, prom. On Loudon, Bankers. 49@49£; Commercial, 40i 
', ; Paris, 5 francs per dollar. Telegram s, 1 per cent 

03- Latest price of Gold at New York, Feb.fl8, at 3 P.M., 113. Latest 
price of Sterling, $4 88®S489&. 

tfS~ Price of Money here, 1@1$ per cent per month— bank rate. In the 
open market, I(« 1$. Demand active. 



FINANCE. 
In monetary affairs we have nothing new to report. Continued and 
increasing ease L* the rule, and will be for some time to come until the re- 
quirement* of moving crops will create a demand. Coin is shipped in 
moderate sums without lessening our supply, because more than replaced 
by coinage of our mint. Oorsaviugs banks are gaining and loaning freely 
on real estate and approved collaterals. A remarkable instance of good 
management and prosperity is the new Market-street Savings Bank, which 
has obtained three hundred and eighty active accounts in the first five 
months of its existence. The Clearing House will go into operation by 
first of March. Most all banks and bankers have joined. The silver 
question has been discussed and almost worn threadbare. Nothing new 
has been elicited. We can add nothing to our remarks of last week. Ex- 
cessive supply, exceeding the demand, is the cause of the glut and low 
price. Time will regulate it, and this is and will be the only solution ; no 
other exists. Legal remedies are preposterous, because they are arbitrary 
in their very nature ; but exchange of commodities, of which silver is one 
now, is regulated by well establish rules of supply and demand, therefore 
anything but arbitrary. In connection with this we have perhaps over- 
looked one factor which might work relief to some extent ; this is the 
hoarding of silver coin West, South, and East. The currency of the 
country was not enticing enough to hoard ; but give to the people some- 
thing tangible and we have no doubt that millions will be absorbed and 
not see daylight for years. This, however, depends solely on the redemp- 
tion of our fractional currency by the Government If this is done, and 
all signs portend to that effect, then both causes combined will give us 
temporary relief. Supposing now that our fractional currency is replaced 
by silver ; it then will form the basis of our every-day transactions ; and 
then the question will arise, Can we retain our Hilver coin? This will 
depend on the rate of gold. If gold remains below 117£, Yes; if it goes to 
that point or above. No; because at 117i it will pay to ship to England 
from New York with prices ruling in London now. For instance: A 
New York merchant has fractional currency, which he exchanges for sil- 
ver. Currency at 1174 i 8 worth 85 10-100 gold, but half dollars are worth 
86 gold in London now. This leaves a small profit for the time being, 
consequently bankers and brokers will soon take advantage of this, buy 
the silver coin, and ship. This will continue until the accumulation of 
silver in London forces a further decline, and makes shipments unprofit- 
able. Turn wherever you like, the same result stareB you in the face — 
supply and demand. We therefore dismiss the subject until next week. 



Califoraians Registered at the Office of Charles Le Gay, Ameri- 
can Commission Merchant, 1 Rue Scribe, Paris, Jan. 21, 1876 : Abel 
Guy, Edmund Brenil, Leon Weill, Mrs. A Massey, Miss Massey, R. B. 
Woodward, Miss Woodward, Miss M. C. Woodward, R. B. Wood- 
ward, Jr., Mr. Derbec, Col. Jules Berton and family, John B. LeGay, 
W. Melvin Smith, H. R. Bloomer, Mrs. J. Preston Moore, C. K. Bones- 
tell, C. F. Fargo, Frederick G. Merchant and family, Jas. Eldredge, W. 
H. Locke, Joseph Gordon. David Bixler and wife, D. E. Easterbrook and 
wife, Mrs. J. H. Hickey, Miss Bella Thomas, Mrs. Ely and family, T. 
P. Howard and wife, Mrs. Hall McAllister, D. E. Hungerford and wife, 
Miss Ada Hungerford. 

Beerbohm's Telegram. — London and Liverpool, Feb. 18, 1876. — 
Floating Cargoes, quiet; Cargoes on Passage, neglected; no business 
doing; No. 2 Spring off Coast, 42s. 6d.@43s; do, for shipment, 40s. 6d.@41s; 
California off Coast, 50a.; do, just shipped and nearly due, 51s; Liver- 
pool, slow; California Club 10s. 6d.@10s lid.; do Average, 10s. Id. © 
10s. 6d.; Red Western Spring, 8s. 10d.@.9s. 8d. 



Mr. P. Aljrnr. No. 8 Clements Lane, London, Im authorized to 

receive subscriptions, advertisements, communications, etc., for this paper, 

Published with this week's issue a Four- 
Page Postscript. 

LATEST ATOMS OF NEWS WITH NOTES. 



The generally strong desire for investment, both in Europe and 
America, has carried up the prices of the better class of railroad and 
other stocks several points, and: the speculative Bhares have likewise felt 
the influence of the general improvement. The London market, especially 
with reference to United States bonds ; of the new fives that market is 
now entirely bare. Money in London continues easy, with the discount 
rates in the open market from J to f} per cent, below the Bank of Eng- 
land rate. The bank has gained £76,000 bullion on balance during the 
week. _ The specie in the Bank of France has increased 19,125,000 francs. 
Dr. Linderman, the mint expert, is of the opinion that it is practicable 
to place some of the new silver coin in circulation immediately and con- 
tinue the issue of it monthly throughout the year in redemption of frac- 
tional paper. He now has a store of 512,000,000 of dimes, francs (as we 
may as well call the 20-cent pieces), quarters and halves, and begins to be 
bothered for store-room. The difference in the intrinsic value of this sil- 
ver coinage and gold is so great that the price of gold would have to go up 
to 117 before the silver change became exportable. At the present time, 
and since the new year, the greenback has been worth about 2 per cent, 
more than silver, so that with gold steady, there would be no object in 
hoarding the silver. Of the $46,000,000 of fractional currency outstand- 
ing, it is supposed that not over §30,000,000 is in circulation, and by the 
close of the year the new coinage would suffice to replace that amount 
Dr. Linderman thinks the country will readily absorb double that of 
silver. 

The Decline in Silver appears to be arrested for the present True, 
it is not easy to feel confidence in the future or to allege satisfactory 
grounds for a belief that silver has reached a relation of comparative sta- 
bility towards gold. Sooner or later the enormous accumulations of the 
continent must be released into the world's active market, and in the 
present condition of trade there is no channel through which they could 
be conducted to absorption except at the cost of further decline in value. 
But this is a problem of the future, and it may not be very near. For the 
present it is gratifying to know that the downward movement has been 
arrested, and that some symptoms of the moment hint at a reaction from 
the lowest point reached. __, 

The Seattle "Tribune" states that Mr. Freeman, the agent of the 
Pacific Mail Company, has submitted a proposition to the Talbot Coal 
Company, offering to take 3,000 tons of coal a month from the mine of 
the latter. If his proposition is accepted and the coal furnished, the 
steamers of the Mail Company will continue their trips to Seattle, and if 
two steamers a month cannot carry it away, three will be sent, or four, or 
as many as may be found necessary. 

The run of Pacific Mail steamer City of San Francisco and Australian 
Company's Bteamer Mikado, last trip to Sydney, was sharply contested. 
The latter left this port at 12 m., December 10th, and the former on 
same day shortly after noon, reaching Sydney at 11 p. m., January 6th. 
The Mikado reached same port two hours after. The latter being simply 
a freighting steamer, is the reason for the daily sheets being nettled into 
deviating from the above facts. 

Marriott's Aeroplane Navigation Company incorporated yester- 
day, with 810,000,000 capital, divided into 100,000 shares. The objects 
of the incorporation are to navigate the air by vessels or conveyances 
constructed for that purpose, and the carrying of passengers, merchan- 
dise, and dispatches, etc., from one place to another. The Directors are 
F. Marriott, Henry Channing Deals, A. T. Harcourt, Ellis Read, and 
E. T. Kennedy. 

Poor Gas.— We noticed last Sunday evening that the gas in St. John's 
Church, Post street, was very poor, and went out in the choir gallery 
several times during service. This ought not so to be, and we call upon 
the Gas Company to see that the matter is looked into speedily. 

In consequence of the pressure on our columns, our list of 
" Quacks" is left out of this issue. It will reappear next_ week, together 
■with a review of the Medical Bill just passed by the Legislature. 



Printed and Published by the Proprietor, Frederick Marriott, 607 to 615 Merchant Street, Ban Francisco, California. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1876. 



THE BABY'S DRAWERS. 

There's alittle drawer in my chamber I finished thf dainty wardrobe, 

Guarded with tender care, And the drawer was almost full 

Where the dainty clothes are lying, Wfth robes of che fineat muslin. 

That my darling shall never wear. And robes of the whitest wool. 
And there, while the hours are wan- I folded them all together, 

Till the house is all at rest, [ing, With a rose for every pair, 
I sit and fancy a baby Smiling, and saying, "Gem fragrant, 

Close to my aching breast. Fit for my prince to wear." 

M v darling's pretty, white garments ! Ah, the radiant Summer morning, 

I wrought them, sitting apart So full of a mother's joy ! 

While his mystic life was' throbbing " Thank God, he is fair and perfect, 

Under my throbbing heart. " My beautiful new-born boy." 

And often my happy dreaming Let him wear the pretty, white gar- 

Breaks in a little song, ments 

Like the murmur of birds at brood- I wrought while sitting apart ; 
ing, Lay him, so sweet and helpless, 

When the days are warm and long. Here, close to my throbbing heart. 
Many and many an evening 
I sit, since my baby came, 
Saying, " What do the angels call him ?" 

For he died without a name ; 
Sit while the hours are waning, 

And the house is all at rest, 
And fancy a baby nestling 
Close to my aching breast. 

AN INCORRIGIBLE POLTGAMIST. 
Of all imprudent adventurers who have ever made Paris the scene 
of their escapades, none can have shown a more complete career of vice 
and delinquency, than the rascal who appearedat the civil tribunal of the 
Seine, a day or two ago. These are some of the leading incidents in Ids 
very eventful life. Born at Haiti, the natural son of a domestic servant, 
he had to flee from the island when about seventeen years of age. Passing 
through New York and London, he appeared in Paris in 1867, with all 
the airs of a distinguished foreigner. Here he obtained access by the aid 
of some plausible stratagem, to an honorable French family, and pro- 
ceeded after the manner of Othello, to lay siege to the daughter of the 
house. No doubt his experience by flood and field outdid in many re- 
spects those of the Moor of Venice, and in due course he became the ac- 
cepted lover and husband of Pauline. Six months of married life sufficed 
to enable him to squander the dowry of the bride and even her jewels and 
ornaments. In each of the succeeding years he is convicted and sentenced 
for swindling. The smaller terms of imprisonment he undergoes ; from 
the heavier terms he escapes by a successful flight. In 18G0, after a 
sojourn of three months in gaol, he proposes to a daughter of a wealthy 
jeweller, whom he is on the point of marrying, when the family discover 
by a chance observation let fall by the suitor, the parents of the former 
wife and the whole histoiy of the former marriage. Two years 
later, however, our hero is more fortunate; and he is formally mar- 
ried in London to an English lady, whom he promptly deserts in turn. 
After this he practices his profession of swindling in the various towns of 
Liverpool, Geneva, Rotterdam, Brussels, Dresden, Berlin and Mayence, 
leaving in several of them a deserted wife or so to mourn his inevitable 
exile. During this time he had passed under soubriquets as many and 
different as the prisons he entered. In 1864, Pauline died, leaving three 
or four children by this monster, and the family, which, according to 
French law, has the power of doing so, prohibited the father from act- 
ing as guardian, or receiving the revenue attached to such an office. 
Hereupon the loving parent, as soon as his existing term ot prison (which 
happened to be in Paris) was over, appeared before the court to claim his 
guardianship, disputing the right of the deceased wife's family to exclude 
him from it, on the ground that he was a subject of Haiti, and not amen- 
able in questions of personal status to the French laws. The tribunal, it 
need hardly be added, dismissed his claim ; but before doing so it had oc- 
casion to elicit the romantic tale of adventure of which the above is only 
a brief and imperfect sketch. 

YE PARSON. 

How professionally meek he weareth the air of one who art holier 
than thou, and how this self-conscious righteousness sticks out from every 
membrane of his body, and culminates in the holy choker ! He never 
quarrels with the world (outside of the pulpit), and consequently bestows 
his pent-up gall upon the partner of his sanctity. Hath he not charity? 
Yea, verily, for he would smite the whole world with plague and refuse the 
beggar a crust in order to bring them into the fold ; and so he would send 
the poor dumb corpse to the little church around the corner, because, for- 
sooth, living it knew how to act the virtues ye parson can only preach. 
Nations aud kingdoms are the playthings of his disposition ; he thrusts 
them forth to damnation with the same compunction as might be felt in 
crushing the unoffending worm. The Pope is his nightmare, the Woman 
who sitteth upon the topmost point of his intellect., and yet without this 
poor Pope full many a sermon would have neither beginning nor end. 
bcience, too, is a bde noir, and the Tyndalls, Darwins and Huxleys are 
ruthlessly condemned to the bottomless pit. Being one of the elect, ye 
parson can do no wrong, yet hath he doubts of Brother Beecher's littletale, 
because he knows how it is iiimseff. He is a professor of emotional gush, 
from the sniveling; slobber of a reconciliation to the pious ecstasy over a 
converted heathen. Holy unction and oily gammon are his stock in trade, 
yet hath he an eye to the main chance, and, when stocks go down, squeal- 
eth with more than wordly squeal. The daily newspaper is his text book, 
and a firBt-class notice his envy. Do parsons ever die ? We fear not very 
often, for the same old threadbare sermons still live. If parsons do (?) reach 
heaven, we trust they are only employed as cherubim and seraphim. Else 
how shall respectable angels enjoy " eternal rest?" 

Further details have been received concerning the sad accident upon 
the Nile, by which two young English ladies, nieces of Mr. Russell Gur- 
ney, lost their lives. Mr. Gurney's party had embarked for the Cataracts 
in two dakabeaJw, or Nile-boats, and while the young ladies were reposing 
in the cabin of their boat a sudden squall came up. The sail was fastened, 
and before the man could let go the line the boat had capsized. She rilled 
instantly, and the young ladies were unable to get out of their cabin. This 
sad accident shows again what care is necessary in Nile navigation, where 
violent sqalls come up almost without warning. 



SWISS AMERICAN BANK. 

Incorporated in Gcucra, Switzerland, January 2-1 tli. 1873. 
Head Office, in Geneva! Capital, £2*000,000. subscribed, $1,000,000 paid 
■ idelfc, HEN BY HENTSCH. San Francisco Branch, successors to 
Hentsch & Eerton, 327 Clay street. Directors: FRANCIS BEBTON and KOBERT 
WAIT. 

This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to transact every 
kind of Banking, Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to negotiate American Se- 
curities in Europe. Deposits received. 

Hill?* of Exchange on New York, Philadelphia, London, Liverpool, Paris, 
Lyons. Marseilles, Bordeaux, Oloron, Brussels, Berlin, Hamburg, Frankfort-, Geneva, 
Lausanne, Chaux-de-Fonds, Neuchatel, Frihourg, Bern, Aani, Soleure, Baden, Basle, 
Zurich, Winterthur, Shaffhausen, St. Gallon, Lucent, Chur, Bellinzona, Locarno. Lu- 
gano, Mcndrisio, Genoa, Turin, Milan, Florence, Rome. 

An Assay Office is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores 
ami sulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any 
part of the country, and returns made through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 
[September 18.1 

THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 
». O. MI ILLS President. | TIIOS. IilUMY V Cashier. 

Agents : 

In New York. Agency of the Bank of Calfornia, No. 12 Pine street; in Boston, 
Tremont National Bank ; in Chicago, Onion National Bank : in St. Louis, Boatman's 
Saving Bank; in London, China, Japan and India, the Oriental Bank Corporation. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Gold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available for the purchase of Merchandise throughout the 
United States, Europe, India, China, Japan and Australia Draw direct on London, 
Dublin, Paris, St. Petersburgh, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Hamburg, Bremen, Berlin, 
Leipsic, Vienna, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Christiana, Got- 
eborg, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, New Zealand^ Hongkong, Shanghai, 
Yokohama. Sept. 26. 

BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter.--- Southeast corner of Cal- 
ifornia and Sansoiiic streets. Head Office— London. Branches— Portland, Or- 
egon ; Victoria and Cariboo, British Columbia. 

Agents;— New York, Bank of Montreal; Chicago, Bank of Montreal; Canada, 
Bank of Montreal; Mexico and South America, London Hank of Mexico and South 
America; Ireland, Bank of Ireland; Scotland, British Linen Company; Knglaild, 
National Provincial Laid; of England; England, North and South Wales Banks ; En- 
gland, Bank of Liverpool. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Deposits received on current ac- 
count subject to check, or on deposit. Exchange sold on London and all the princi- 
pal cities and towns of Ireland and Scotland from £1 upward ; also on New York and 
all principal places in Canada. Commercial Credits granted available in Europe, 
China, Japan, South America, Australia and New Zealand. Approved Bills discounted 
and advances mad*; on good collateral security. 

Nov. 13. WM. H. TILLINGHAST, Manager. 

THE NEVADA BANK, OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Paid Up Capital $5,000,000, in Gold. 

Louis McLane President, j J. C. Flood.. Vice-President. 

BT. K. Masten Cashier. 

Trustees : — J. C. Flood, J. W. Mackay, W. S. O'Brien, Jas. G. Fair, Louis McLane, 
Correspondents:— London— Smith, Payne & Smiths. Hamburg— Hessy, Newman 
& Co. New York— Eugene Kelly & Co. Chicago— Merchants' National Bank. Bos- 
ton—Second National Bank, New Orleans— State National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to receive deposits on open account, issue certificates of de- 
posit, buy and sell exchange, purchase bullion, and transact a general banking busi- 
ness. Collections made and proceeds remitted at current rates of exchange. ' >Ct '.'. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL GOLD BANK 0? SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paid up Capital $2,000,000, Oold. President. K. C. AVool- 
worth ; Vice-President, 1). Callaghan ; Cashier, George W. Rodman. 
Correspondents— London : Baring Bros. & Co. ; Chartered Mercantile Bank of In- 
dia, London and' China. Dublin: Provincial Bank of Ireland. Hamburg: Hesse, 
Neuntan &Co. Paris: Hottingner & Co. New York: National Bank of Commerce Bos- 
ton : Blackstone National Bank. Chicago : First National Bank. This Bank is pre- 
pared to transact a general Banking business. Deposits in Gold, Silver and Currency 
receiTed Subject to check or on special dejHisit. Exchange for sale on the principal 
cities of the United States, Great Britain, Ireland and the Continent. Commercial 
Credits issued available in Kuroj«, China and Japan. Collections attended to and 
prompt returns made at the lowest market rate of Kxchange. Dec. 13. 



PIONEEE LAND AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, BANK OF SAVINGS 
AND DEPOSIT. 

Southeast corner California an I Montgomery streets. Safe 
Deposit Block. Incorporated 1860. Guarantee fund, SH0O,QQO. Ninety-Sis 
dividend payable on January 5th. Ordinary deposits receive per cent. Term 
deposits receive 12 per cent. This incorporation is in its seventh year, and refers 
to over 3,500 depositors for its successful and economical management. 

H. KOPAHL, Cashier. 
Tnos. Gray, President ; J. C. Dcxcas, Secretary. March -J.1. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK (LIMITED). 

Capital, ft.">.000,000,of which $3,000,000 is fully paid tip as 
present capital. San Fran cisco Office, 424 California; London Office, __ Old 
Broad street. President, M. S. LATH AN ; Manager. JAMES M, STKEETEN ; Assist- 
ant Manager, CAMILLO MARTIN. London Bankers, London Joint. Stock Bank; 
New York Bankers, Brexel, Morgan & Co. ; Boston Bankers, Third National Bank. 
This Bank is now prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Kxchange 
Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and all parts of the 
world. October 23. 

SAN FEANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 
■ t\*5^ California street, corner Webb. Capital and Ite- 

*ji&.4L serve, $231,000. Deposits, .<*>, n 19 f 000. Directors: James de Fremcry, 
President; Albert Miller, Vice-President; C. Adolphe Low, D. J. Oliver, {.harks 
Baum, Charles Pace, Washington Bartlett, A. Campbell, Sen., George C. Totter; 
Cashier, Lovcll White. Dividends for two years past have been 7£ and 9 per cent, re- 
spectively, on ordinary and term deposits. Dividends are payable semi-annually, in 
January and July. Money loaned on real estate and on United States Bonds, oi 
equivalent securities. October iJO. 

GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

Guarantee Capital 8200, 000. —Office 526 California street, 
North side, between Montgomery and Kearny streets, Office hours, from 9 .v..u 
bo 3 P.M. Extra hour on Saturdays from 7 to S P.M, for receiving of Deposits only. 
Loans made on Real Estate aud other collateral securities, at current rates of interest 
President L. GUTTK.. Secretary GEO, LETTE. 

D1BBCTOBS. 
F. Boeding, H. Schmieden, Cbas. Kohler, Ed. Erase, Dan. Meyer, Chas. Meinecki 
George 11. EggersJ P. Spreckles. Feb. 1. 

OFFICES OF AERIAL STEAM KAVIGATION CO., 

Jan. 4. No. 607 to 615 Merchant street, San Francisco, 






CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



8 



YEARS AGO. 

In the purple bow . 
Tli- 1 train, ami tin- chain of pottrL 
hut met full 

I in u I ':u-li!inrv ihawl ! 
I'm a iiv >w, ami Iw'ii-, 

And wreJtrh, 1 won't ny how nwi 
But she oh, confound it all ! 
i ra ago 

bat har door in .•» i 
Th;it jar I felt it a week 
A fellow** nerves will quiver, you know, 

I remember the room we parted in ; 

The twilight the twittering birds; 
H r sunny huir with it;* turquoise pin, 

thing eyes where s tear had been-— 

Our passionate parting ■> 
She waits me vet in some twilight place, 

Flushed with that passionate glow ; 
A wraith UU>- creature of light and grace, 
A dream, s vision, whose Heetang face 

I \\-i years ago. 

No old acquaintance for me, my lad! 

N<> r> » me Aions here. 
Rosalias, Maries, grim or a/lad, 
The old loves hide that 1 have had — 



But in a rosier sphere. 



-Public Opinion. 



LETTER FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Victoria, Feb. 8, 1876. 

Editor News Letter — Sib: "The Sick Man of the North M is saved, 
replaced the free-hooters who followed the banner of 
the Hon, <;. A. Walkum. Elliott, the new Premier, is an able lawyer, 
skilK-il in debate, just the man fit at litis important crisis to secure solid 
jes f«»r the Province An Act of Parliament, or a contract drawn 
Dp by him, will not be s worthless document Educated in Trinity i Jol- 
ts English is common sense, and hie dispatches to tin- Canadian Gov- 
ernment will prove that he is not one of the " OUld " stock we turned out 

Ia*t week. Brown, of New Westminster, is a sensible, self-made man, 
with lar position of Finance Minis- 

ter without p»y t unmistakable evidence of true patriotism, Vernon is a 
young man without experience, but made of the metal that indicates an 
ambitious spirit Highly educated and fond of popular applause, he iscer- 
pdn to 1 ful public Bervant Humphreys is a politician, and 

popular with the mass ol the peonle. He mav be described as " a smart 
ble British Columbian Ministry would venture to do 
ription of the new Ministry is l.iorrowed from Public 

a, an 1 I believe it is correct. The new men have important duties 
to discharge. The first and most important is to prove clearly to the people 
that in dealing with the Dominion < rovernment, it would be evidence of 

. to imitate the Jew and demand the conditions of tbe bond. The 

fcilk of annexation is twaddle. The honor and glory of retiring from alli- 

i enjoy the privilege of provincial insignificance, 

i] idea. Noio is the time. Now or never we shall secure solid ad- 
vantages. J have faith in the new Ministry, but I dread the politicians 
and the want of wisdom which has for years marked the conduct of the 

. Columbian people. The bond signed by the Dominion Govern- 
ment is our right bower, the left and the ace. But we may lose the game. 
The defeated Ministers may stuff our empty skulls with twaddle, and steal 
away the little dense we have. We shall see. I am 

A British Columbian. 

IMPORTANT NEWS, IF TRUE. 

London, February 5th. — On Thursday last Queen Victoria entered 

: loir of her unmarried daughter, the Princess Beatrice, and said, 

rice, my dearest, you want to get married, don't you?" "Oh, 

don't I. just," replied the young girl, enthusiastically, " and it is leap-year, 

t*>o. Hooray ! But say, ma, who's the him?" "Prince Louis, of Bat- 

rg," replied her Majesty. "That'll be awfully jolly," said the 

isa : " Louis is such a sweet name," and she began scrawling on the 

blotting pad : " Beatrice Battenburg," and wondering how she would look 

in white. Yesterday morning, when her august mother again entered 

Her Royal Highness' apartments, she found her daughter in tears— tears 

of indignation rather than grief. "Why, drat the child, what ails her?" 

said Her Majesty. " Oh, ma," cried the Princess, "look at this," and she 

pointed to the following item in the Times; 

Calcttta, February 4tli.— Prince Louis, of Battenburg, while pig-sticking to-day, 
fell and broke his collar bone. The said event has cast a gloom over the community. 

"Well," said the Queen, " what of that?" " What of that?" echoed 
the daughter ; " what of that? With all due deference to you, ma'am, I 
will have no Prime Louis in mine. I thought we had come down low 
enough when poor Louise married into a grocers family ; but a butcher, a 
man that makes his living by sticking horrid pigs — not much, Alexandrina 
Victoria," and kicking off her mother's crown, with the remark that that 
te sort of hair-pin she was, her Koyal Highness betook herself to her 
<>ru and gave way to tears. 

[ Were the Americans not as notorious for their tuft-hunting in Europe 
as they are assiduous in back-biting their hosts when they return, the 
above, from the Sunday World, might be appreciated. — Ed. N. L.] 



Bears are very plenty in tbe Adirondack region, this winter, and four 
appeared in broad daylight at North Creek, the other day. On Sunday, 
three weeks ago, a larLfe black bear entered the church at that place just 
after the minister had commenced his sermon, and walked leisurely up 
the passage way until he reached nearly the middle of the church. The 
women jumped on the top of the seats and screamed at the bight of their 
voices ; all was confusion, and the services came to a stand-still. Bruin 
raised himself iipon his haunches anil calmly surveyed the scene, and, 
seemingly satisfied with his scrutiny, deliberately walked out. He was 
followed, but escaped. 



THE ANOL0.CALIFOB5IAN BANK (LIMITED*. 

4 •£•> <»IMoro, • ,,, I r:ineiv.<o.---l,4>ii.lon Oftli .-. U 

I ** -a. 

'■■ 

>ut tin- world. l'i:i i> t i > >.'. t 

<K-i 4. • ******* 

MARKET STREET BANK OF SAVINGS. 

N,i.)i:ti Mrtrkrt streak, opposite Pmlooe Hotel, Omlloawr, 
: 

■ 
i RiWKKRANS, President ; WILLI VM -i OONOLLT, Cashier ; THOMAS it. 
LEWIS, 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK — GUARANTFR CAPITAL *300,000. 

Offloers i Presides)*, John Parrot t; Vice-President, Jerome 
Lincoln ; Boarotary, W I Sidney \ Sniltli 

Lpproved Offli 

■' ■ Oi ■ 

THE MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
M lanital, 85,000,000.— Alrtnsui liu.vmini. President; <\ ¥r\ 

\ Kt Hogg. Vloe-Presidenl ; li I' n 

... 

Augu ■ 

FRENCH SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
Basil street, above Kearny, <•. SKane. i>ircctor. tonus 

mads "ii real estate and other counters] securities at current rates oi 



411 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Masonic Saving** ami Loan Bnnk, No. 6 PonI m1 reel . Masonic 
Sao PYancisco. At a meeting ol the Board of Directoni <>f this Ban* 
held January Loth, 1876, a dividend was declared al the rate ol nine (9) per cent per 
annum on Term Deposits, and seven and one-half (7$) per cunt, per annum on Ordi 
■ i isits, for the Bemi-annna] term ending January 21, istu, payable on 
iuary£2, L876, freeot Federal Taxes. 
Jan. 29. 11. T. GRAVES, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tbe iliuernlu Savings mill Loan Society, San Francisco, 
January 86, 1876. AJ a regular meeting ol the Board of Directors of the Hi- 
beruia Saviugs and Loan Society, held this day, a dividend at the rate of ol 
cent, per annum was declared for the half year ending January 21, 1S7<J, free from 
Federal Tax, and payable from and after this date. 
Jan. ?!'. K1 >WAK1> MARTIX Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings »nii Loan Society, 619 Clay street.— At a meeting; 
(if the Board ol Directors, held January Uth, 1876, a dividend, free of Federal 
Tax, .if nine ('.!) par Cent DOT am mm mi all deposits, for t tie six months ending Dceeni- 
ber 81st, IsT.'i. was declared, payable on and after the 16th instant. 

Jan. 12. CYRUS W. CAKMANY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

T lie French Savings and Loan Society has declared a div- 
idend of nine (y) per cent, per annum, free of Federal Tax. for the half .year 
ending December 31st, 1S75, payable on and after January 17th, 1876. Bv order, 
Jan. -22. (illSTAVK MAHK, Director. 

W. M. SEARBY, 

Di'ii^arist, ami Pharmacist, 86!> Market street, opposite 
Powell, and Folsora street, comer Fifth, San Francisco. Choice Perfumery, 
Sachets, Colognes, Scented Soaps, Combs, Hair Brushes, Tooth Brushes, Bath and 
Faee Sponges, Cosmetics, and other toilet requisites. Feb. 6. 

FURNITURE NOTICE. 
(Ci oodwin A- Co. have not yet removed, bnt have replenished 

\~J( with an entire new stock of Parlor, Chamber and Dining Room Suits. Urcat 
Bargains offered. U00DW1N & CO., 

Peb. 6. No. 312 Pine street. 

WIRE AND WIRE ROPE FOR SALE IN STORE OR IN BOND. 

1,^Tjf\ l rf' B miles, Nos. 8 and 0, <aalvnnized Telegraph Wire. 
OH"™ " 200Coilfl Galvanized Wire Rope for Ship Rigging, in Store- All kinds 
of Wire, Galvanized on Black Iron, Brass, Copper, Steel, Market, Stone, Spring, 
Tinned, etc., etc. In Stock and Wade to Order— 

BRASS AND IRON WIRE CLOTH, 

Battery Screens, Fly Cloth, Ore Screens. Sand Screens, Wire Netting, Galvanized or 
not ; Ornamental Wire Work ol all kinds. Staples, Biddies and Selves of all kinds, 
Flower Stands, Summer Houses, and everything that can be made from Wire. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 Tine street, S. F. 

WIRE ROPE, 

Flat and round, of Iron or Steel, on hand or made to order 
of unequaled excellence. Picture Cords, Sash Cords, etc., etc. 
Jan. -22. A. S. HALLIDIK, 113 Pine street. 

DELINQUEMT POLL TAXE^ 

Office of the Tax Collector ol the City and County of San 
Francisco, January 22, 1876.— Public notice is hereby given to all persons 

who have failed or neglected to pay the POLL TAX due for the fiscal year 1875 70, 
that the same has become DELINQUENT, and been placed in mv bands for collec- 
tion, and if not paid on or before the FIRST MONDAY OF -MARCH, will become a 
lien upon their property, and be collected as provided in Section 3.S00 of the Political 
Code. (Jan. 29. WM. FOKD Tax Co lector. 

SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY, OF S4N FRANCISCO, 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sansome Sis. 

CAPITAL 7 $2,000,000. 

This Company is iionoptn for the renting- of vaults and the 
transaction of all business connected with a Safe Depository. Pamphlets (riving 
full information and rates can be obtained at the office of the Company. Hours, 
from 8a.m. to P.M. September 18. 

MONEY TO LOAN. 

John T. Little, Money Broker and Real Estate Agent, dis- 
counts notes and loans money on all kinds of collaterals In large amounts; buys 

and Bella real estate, ' OFFICE , 10.01 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Dec. -"•■ Opposite Bank of California. 



O 



15,000 TOWS PER MONTH 
flllack Diamond nml other Mt. Diablo Coals received and 

for salt- by [May 23. J P. I!. CORNWALL, Pres't B. D. Coal Mining Co. 



T 



MR=!. CORLETT, 
eaehcrOf English and Italian Singing, the PianO I'Orte, 

:tnd Elocution, 331 Keoroystroet, Room 18. Jan. 29. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1876. 



THEATRICAL, ETC. 

Fabbri Opera, — The production of VAfrivaiiw. last Sunday night (or 
rather a portion of Moverbeer's Chef D'Ovavrc, for it was so cut down as to 
be scarcely recognizable) must have been attended pecuniarily with suc- 
cess, for the house was crowded in every part. From a musical point of 
view it was far from being perfect, but as it is an utter impossibility to 
produce an opera of its calibre properly in San Francisco, in its present 
musically crude state, it is useless to find fault. If the public will insist 
upon grand operas that expert managers find it difficult to place on the 
stage, even in localities where chorus singers are a reality and talented 
artists plentiful, it is natural that Madame Fabbri should comply with its 
demands and pocket its money. But still we maintain that those who 
saw V Africa inc on Sunday last, for the first time, departed with a very 
poor idea of what the opera really is. Perhaps of all the characters we 
have had the pleasure of seeing Madame Fabbri enact, that of "Selica " 
suits her best, the loose garb and swarthy make up setting off her figure, 
whilst the unmistakable passion this talented lady is able at times to 
throw into her singing, became the character the wild child of nature rep- 
resented. In the second act, her rendition of the aria, number four on the 
score, was vastly different from the way in which it is written, and not at 
"all improved by the change, but, with this exception, her performance 
was generally satisfactory. Madame Bertha Roemer, as " Donna Inez," 
sang with fair accuracy the part assigned to her, but as neither she nor 
Miss Frankenberg possess one of the essential qualities of an operatic 
artist, that is, a voice, their attempting to sing anywhere out of a drawing- 
room is rather ridiculous. Carl Formes, as " Don Pedro," was excellent, 
his acting throughout being perfect. The "Vasco de Gama " of Mr. 
Habelman was, perhaps, his best performance since Le Postilion, at Piatt's 
Hall, though in both cases he sang terribly flat at times. Jacob Mueller, 
as Nelusco, sang well, the character and music giving full scope for his 
powerful voice, but the excellence nf his impersonations are sadly marred 
by the over confident air he assumes. Truly some artists live in the 
vanity of their own conceit. One bright and redeeming point in the 
evening's entertainment was the appearance of M'lle Cora Adriana, who 
looked beautiful and danced enchantingly. The orchestra was vastly 
superior to the previous three Sundays, especially in the stringed depart- 
ment, which included eleven violins, two tenors and a bass. In connec- 
tion with this section of the company we may mention that the short- 
comings alluded to in our last issue were due rather to Manager Bert's re- 
ported non-fulfillment of his contract than to Madame Fabbri'B neglect, 
he having been paid in advance for a full and efficient body of musicians, 
and then couldn t or wouldn't supply them. Wachtel's arrival will, how- 
ever, place things in better order, for, we feel sure, he will not Bubmit to 
any backslidings of the kind on the part of the management, and will take 
care, for his own credit, that the performances he takes part in shall be as 
complete as possible. 

Maguire's New Theater. — By a remarkably fine system of advertise- 
ment and puffing, Mrs. Jas. Oates obtained during her last season here a 
reputation for — no one exactly knew what, but still she was spoken of 
generally in an enthusiastic sort of way, as somebody whom every one 
ought to see. We opine that when her present engagement terminates, 
the voice of public opinion will have vastly changed, for she has returned 
from her country tour even more hoodlumish than ever. But what she 
has lost in delicacy she has gained in audacity, for she puts forth her 
claims to be allowed to enact the most exacting characters of Verde and 
other composers of real opera. If she possessed either voice, power or 
style, it would be pardonable presumption on her part to aim at improving 
both the minds of herself and her hearers ; but as she possesses neither of 
these attributes essential to a vocalist — her popularity depending mainly 
on the amount of license she can introduce into her performances with- 
out actually exceeding the bounds of the law — it resolves itself into what 
is termed, in common parlance, c/teek. If Lecocq could have witnessed the 
performances during this week of his most beautiful composition, Girojle- 
Girojta, it would certainly have embittered his future career to think that 
an opera that was specially written to prove the essential differences be- 
twixt opera bouffc and opera comique should be so altered for the worse as to 
sink beneath the level of the poorest burlesque. We regret this the more 
as Mrs. Oates is supported by an excellent company, whom it would be 
pleasant to listen to were they not imbued with the same broad freedom 
which characterizes their principal. Perhaps the only redeeming point in 
the evening's performance is Mr. Howson's Bolero, which in itself is an 
excellent piece of acting ; comical, without being vulgar ; ludicrous, yet 
natural. Mr. Drew's Marasquin would have been better if he had been 
left alone by his irrepressible Girojle, though his voice and style are far 
from being amiss. Mr. Hall is too great a stick to excel in anything so 
light as opera comique. A notable exception to the general laxity of style 
was the charming and modest impersonation of Paquita, by Miss Rose 
Temple, who is a veritable rosebud of fresh beauty and attractiveness. 
Mr. Henri Laurens, as Pedro t bids fair to achieve a moderate success, his 
acting being good and his voice fair, though he is suffering at present from 
the usual climatic hoarseness. The general arrangements were good, and 
the chorus excellent. To prove the decrease in Mrs. Oates' popularity, 
9 he receives scarcely a hand of applause. 

California Theater. — Mrs. Waller's engagement terminated at this 
house on Saturday evening last *ith a very fine performance of Lacrezia 
Borgia. Oh Monday Jeanette, Mr. Hill's adaptation of a French play, 
was placed on the boards, to be replaced last night by Our Boys, for the 
benefit of Mr. Harry Edwards. The construction of Jeannctle is some- 
what intricate in itself, an underplot marring, we think, the exposition 
of the leading details by its prominence. Mr. Keene, as the idiot, 
" Claude Marie," proved his capability in a style of acting foreign to that 
he usually attempts. Mims Pateman, as "Jeannette," acted her usual 
success, carrying the sympathies of her audience with her through all the 
phases of the difficult character assigned to her. As " Roussel," Mr. 
Pateman proved his remarkable versatility, whilst Mr. Mestayer made an 
excellent "Caussade." If there was a flaw in the cast, it was Mr. John 
Wilson's declamatory rendering of the character of the Jew Simon. We 
regretted the absence of Miss Wilton from this cast. She can be ill- 
spa-ed. Next week numerous benefits will help to fill up the intervening 
days before Mrs. Scott Siddon's engagement commences. 

Mrs. Prank Rea takes her first benefit on Tuesday evening, the 29th 
instant. The splendid programme she offers to the public proves her un- 
bounded popularitj', and presages an excellent house and bumper re- 



TWO GREAT EVENTS 
Tuesday next, the Twenty-second of February, will be marked by 
two of the most notable events that have ever excited the universal atten- 
tion and interest of this coast. We need not say that we refer to the 
splendid Centennial ball to be given at Union Hall by the ladies of San 
Francisco, and the great Thirty Thousand Dollar Race, on the afternoon 
of the same day. The ball itself will be a most brilliant and distinguished 
gathering of our best citizens, noted people and society generally. The 
arrangemenis for it are unique, and some of the features of the excep- 
tionally elaborate entertainment have -never been seen before upon this 
coast, nor exceeded in importance and beauty anywhere. The weather 
for the great race seems propitious, and the concourse at the track will be 
immense. The day will be observed as a general holiday all over the 
State. Exhaustive reports of both these notable events will be found in 
our next week's issue. 

A noble fellow that tramp was who returned a five-dollar bill he said 
he had found in an old vest a Norwich gentleman had given him. His 
honesty was rewarded with a one-dollar bill, and the next day the " five" i 
turned out to be a counterfeit ! There is no counterfeit, however, in th« . 
sensation made by the new silver-plated dual water spigot for bath-rooms, 
just received by Bush & Milne, under the Grand HoteL Their stock of . 
gas fixtures and plumbing goods is the best in the city. 

For "Lies of the Day," see Postscript. 

WADE'S OPEEA HOUSE, 

Mission street near Thir«l---Frejlericl* W. Bert, Lessee and 
Blanager.— Special Announcement ! The Management begs to announce to the I 
public of San Francisco that, at an enormous expeiwc, a limited engagement has I 
been effected with the world-celebrated Tenor, THEODOR WACHTEL, whose sue- I 
cesses throughout Europe and America has been unprecedented in the annals of the 
lyric stage, and have stamped him as the Leading Tenor of the World. HEKK WACH- 
TEL will have the honor of making his first appearance as Manrico, on Monday Even- 
ing, Feb. 21, 1876, in Verdi's Grand Opera of 1L TROVATORE ! Supported 'by the 
entire FABBRI OPERA COMPANY. In consequence of the enormous expense at- 
tending this engagement, the following scale of prices has been adopted : Dress Cir- I 
cle (Reserved Seat only), §3 ; Paxquette and Orchestra Circle (Reserved Seat), £2 50; | 
Parquette and Orchestra Circle (General' Admission), $2; Family Circle (Reserve! 
Seat), $1 50 ; Family Circle (General Admission), SI ; Gallery, 50 cents ; Proscenium 
Boxes (according to location), 815 and g20 ; Mezzanine boxes (according to location), 
$12 and $15. Seats cau be secured at Sherman «fc Hyde's Music Store, corner of Sut- 
ter and Kearny streets, on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of this week, from 10 a.m. 
to i p.m., and at Wade's Opera House on Monday at 10 a.m. During the engagement ' 
of Herr Wachtel, the Free List will be entirely suspended. Feb. 19. I 

~~CAUFOBHIA THEATER. 

Mr. Barton Still takes pleasure in announcing an engage- ! 
ment. limited to THREE WEEKS ONLY, with the Beautiful and Aeeom-J 
plished Artiste, MRS. SCOTT SIDDONS, to commence on MONDAY EVENING. 
February 28, 1870, and to embrace the following standard plavs : As You Like It, 
Romeo and Juliet, The Hunchback, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, The 
Lady of Lyons, Cymbeline, King Rene's Daughter, King John, and Macbeth. Sr-ECIAB, ' 
Notice. — The sale of seats for single performances is postponed until next Tuesday, 
when the entire programme will be announced. Season seats and boxes for Mrs. 
Scott Siddons' engagement can be secured now. Feb 19. J 

~ MAG IKE'S OPEEA HOUSE. 

Bnsli street, bet. Montgomery and Kearny. ---T. Mas n ire, 
Sole Proprietor.— This Evening aud Every Evening and Saturday Matinee. 
The Famous CALIFORNIA MINSTRELS ! More" New Faces ! Great Success of the 
Universal San Francisco Favorite, JOHNNIE DE ANGELIS ! also of LA PETITE 
SALLIE DE ANGELIS and T. J. DE ANGELIS, in new Duets, Songs and Dances, 
and German Extracts. Continued Success of the Great JOLLY NASH, in au Entire 
New Budget. Complete Change of Programme this Wee c The performance will 
c onclude with the new fa rce of "THE COMING MAN ! _e_- 19- 

WADE'S OPERA HOUSE, 

Mission street, between Third and Fonrth.— F. W. Bert, 3 
Lessee and Manager. Pronounced Success of ALICE KINGSBURY in 
FANCHON ! See the Rustic Ballet ! Beautiful Maypole Dance ! Matinee this Satur- 
day Afternoon. Special Matinee on Washington's Birthday. Magnificent Living Pict- 
ures, illustrating important Scenes in the Life of Washington! ALICE KINGS- 
BURY in FANCHON! Superb Cente inial Ballet! Extra Attractions ! Monday 
Evening —WACHTEL in IL TROVATORE. No performance to-morrow (Sundayl 
evening. Feb. 19. 

NEW BELLA UNION THEATER. 

Kearny street, between Washington and Jackson. --- Samnel 
Tetlow, Proprietor ; W. C. Crosbie, Stage Manager ; E. Zimmer, Musical Di- 
rector. Mondav, January 31st. LINA EDWIN and BLAND HOLT, Specialty and 
Burlesque Artists. PAUL MARTI NETTI, ALFKED MARTINETTI, and JOSEPHINE 
MICHELY, the Renowned Pantomimists. MISS KITTY HENDERSON and GEoRGB 
F. M^ORE, the Great Dutch Comiques. COGILL aud COOPER, Celebrated Song 
and Dance Artists. Feb. 19. 

MAGUIRE'S NEW THEATER. 

Thomas Hagnire, Proprietor.— Most Brilliant Inaugural 
of the Comic opera Season. San Francisco's favorite, MRS. J AMI S A. < 'ATi-.S, 
and her Brilliant and Powerful Comic Opera Company ! GIROFLE-GIROFLA every 
Evening this week (Sunday excepted). GIROFLA Matinee— This Saturday Afternoon, 
at 2 o'clock . Box Office open dai 'y. Feb . 19. 

PACIFIC HALL. 

ITlirst Benefit iu San Francisco of Mrs. Frank Ron. Tuesday i 
" Evening, February 29th, on which occasion the Leading Ladies and Gentlemen 
Of the California Theater, through courtesy of Mr. Barton Hill, have kind Jy offered 
their services. MR DANIEL O'CONNELL will recite a poem written by himself. 
MISS KATE DEN1N, MISS SINGER, MRS. BUSH, MISS ADELE LEIGHTON, 
and several pupils of MRS. JULIA MELVILLE, will appear Programmes in bills of 
the day. \ Feb. 19. 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Bnsh street, above Kearny.— John McCulIonprh. Proprietor > 
and Manager; Barton Hill, Acting Manager. This (Saturday) Afternoon and 
Evening, February 19th, positively last performances of JEANNETTE. Monday. 
February 21st. Benefit of T. W. KEENE— WAITING FOR THE VERDICT and THE 
Y< lUNG BRIGAND. Thursday, February 24th— First Benefit of MISS ALICE HAR- 
RISON^ Fo b. 19. _ 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Monday Evening, February 21st, 1S7U, Benefit of\JWr. T. W. 
Keene. The Great Drama, entitled WAITING EOR THE VERDICT ! To 
conclude with THE YOUNG BRIGAND ! Miss Aggie Keene as the Young Brigand, 
Box Plan now open. Feb. it). __ 

CALIFORNIA THEATER. 

Miss Alice Harrison begs toaniionnce thathcr First Benefit j 
in California will take place on THURSDAY EVENING, Feb. 24, 1876. NAVAL 
ENGAGEMENTS and THE LITTLE DETECTIVE ! Box book now open. Feb. li>. 



Feb. 19, 1876.] 



GAUFORKIA ai.»\ ki;ti>kk. 



THE STOLEN KISa 

Mrhon darkneM ihroodi kb« 
urtli, 

»re Unfiling in their mirth, 
tli.' flowers 
birth, I" kim thorn in their fairy bow 
Snwv ii, .in K earth, The row, while blushing, hu 

it imxltrn l>r.-,-2t' bead, 
Dans fa f deep blue nas, As if aha thought bar wont read. 

Aiil b the main, Hut yet we prise her more for thin, 

and ki*t, and Ida again T And to forgm the atolan Idas. 
Svn Prani ukso, February 1 », 1875, B. 



Doaa 

The following extiacta are from "False Boa«ta and True," pub- 
• ■• Word, I«»ck & Tyler, of London: 

t • -us aneodotee some are extremely onrions. mnre 
!i show that animals have sympathy and affection for 
»tWr. The following is vouched for by tlic wife of Archdeacon 
Band : 

"Thi I to ua at Whitburn. It was half Danish, and had 

a neat attachment t-> my pony, which, on one oooaaion, was severely hurt. 
When the pony was well enough bo be turned unto :i field, we constantly 
prough it carrots and other i?ood things, and aa constantly saw Traveler 
nah "tf into tli<' garden, and return with two or three fallen apples in his 
mouth, lay them before the pony, and then watch him eating them with 
the greatest demonstrations of pleasure." 

till prettier story,** says UissCobbe, "has been sent to me of a 

larye dog kept at Algiers by Miss Emily Napier, daughter of Sir William 

■ :" 

"The d '-,' was sent every morning to fetch bread from the bakers, and 

regularly brought home twelve rolls in a basket ; but at last it waa ob- 

that for several mornings there were only eleven rolls in the 

. and, on watching the dog, he was found to stay on his way and 

bestow one roll on a poor, sick and starving lady-dog, hidden, with her 

puppies, in a corner on the road from the shop. The baker was instructed 

to put thirteen rolls in the basket, after which tbe dog delivered the 

twelve faithfully for a few days, and then left thirteen in the basket — 

the token. :»s it proved, that his sick friend was convalescent, and able to 

dispense with charity." 

HELP ONE OF THE "SIX HUNDRED." 

We beg to call the attention of all Englishmen in San Francisco to 
the fact that there is now residing in this city one Win. Robert Duke, who 
was one of the Six Hundred made immortal by the celebrated charge at 
Balaklava. The hero is old, infirm and penniless, and is at present pro- 
vided for by the kindness of the British Benevolent Society. That he is 
no sham is abundantly proven by his discharge signed by his commanding 
officer, which states that Win. Itob. Duke, Trumpeter of the Thirteenth 
Dragoons (one of the regiments that formed the Light Brigade), received 
en wounds at Balaklava, some of them very severe, and, having 
been taken prisoner in the charge, was exchanged in consequence. He 
has been photographed by Bradley & liulofson, so that those who wish 
may procure a very rare souvenir of one of the most heroic deeds the 
world has known. But in the meantime the old warrior wishes to join 
relations in Australia, and end his days in peace. To ensfble him to get 
there, a subscription has been opened, to which we trust all Englishmen, 
and Americans too, for that matter, will generously respond. Subscrip- 
tions will be received, or may be sent to Mr. McCurry, Secretary British 
Benevolent Society, or to the office of the Hews Letter. 

To the two gentlemen who are preparing to cut each other's 
throat in a legal way over the inestimable privilege of preparing the 
city's directory, we would offer a kindly suggestion. Instead of continu- 
ing their vendetta, let these men of names and places coalesce and issue 
an entirely unique and attractive style of directory. To do this, they 
have only to add to-each name a condensed biographical sketch of each 
person. This, with the suggestion that each subject combined the most 
remarkable personal attractions with eminent adaption for a Congressional 
career, would insure an unheard of popularity and unprecedented sale. 
It would also be an improvement to add a photograph of every person 
whose name is inserted. The chief utility of such a departure "would be 
that it would relieve the News Letter of the rather onerous pressure at 
present endured from the admiring friends of certain fat-witted nobodies 
who insist upon our adding the latter aspirants to greatness to our gallery 
of " Men We Know." 

Bradley & Rulofson send us two photographs of Herr Theodor 
Wachtel, the renowned tenor. Wachtel is certainly a most remarkably 
Well-preserved man ; he must by now have attained a " certain age," yet, 
unless photography lies, which it cannot, he still looks as fresh and young 
as he did years ago. Whether he has discovered the fountain of perennial 
youth, or owes his beauty in part to the exquisite workmanship of Brad- 
ley & Rulofson, we know not. 

A raptured ■writer inquires, " What is there under heaven more 
humanizing, or, if we may use the term, more angelizing than a fine 
black eye in a lovely woman ?" Two black eyes is the only answer 
thought of at present. The best known means of attracting eyes of this 
description is to wear a suit purchased of that artist in costume, J. M. 
Litchfield, corner Washington and Sansome. 

French Language and Literature by Prof. Ambrose P. Dietz, Ph. D. , 
of the Lycee Imperial de Louis-} e-Grand (University of France), and holder 
of a first-grade teacher's certificate issued by the City and County Board 
of Examination. Apply at 302 Fremont street, near Folsom. 

The splendid painting of "Farragut's Fleet passing the Forts," by 
De Haas, has been sold to Mrs. R. C. Johnson for §5,000, by Morris, 
Schwab & Co. It is one of that talented painter's finest efforts. 

A veritable sensation has been made by the exhibition of Bradford's 
famous picture of " The Polaris in. Winter Quarters." It is certainly a su- 
perb and strikingly powerful work of art. 



Tor "Lies of the Day," see Postscript. 



DISTANCES REDUCED, 
^iiiiiiti«'i HeKeea Co., ftteek Broke**, »n<l Dealer* in Btoeh 



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THIED ANNUAL MEETING OF THE PACIFIC JOCKEY CLTJB. 

The Great Four Mile anil Repeat Running; Race— Magnifi- 
cent Purse of $30,000 in Gold Coin ! Divided as follows : £15,000 to tlie first 
horse ; $0,000 to the second horse ; $i>,000 to the third horse ; $4,000 to the fourth 
horse. Weights to be carried : 3 years old, 90 pounds ; 4 years old, 104 pounds ; 6 
years old, 110 pounds ; 6 years old and upwards, 114 pounds'; 3 pounds allowed for 
mares and geldings. Comes off on TUESDAY, Fehruary 22, 1S7G (good day and track), 
over the track of the BAY DISTRICT FAIRGROUND ASSOCIATION, San Francisco, 
CaL The following horses have entered : E. J. Baldwin names eh h Rutherford, by 
Australian, dam Aerolite by Lexington — 5 years old ; M. A. Walden names ch h 
Revenue Jr., by Revenue, dam Nannie Harper by Glencoe— aged ; M. A. Littell names 
ch h Foster, by Lexington, dam Verona, by 'imp Yorkshire— aged ; Henry Welch 
names ch h Chance, by Venture, dam Annette by Lexington— 4 years old ; Thomas 
li. Faucett names b h Grinstead, by Gilroy, dam sister to Ruric, by imp Sovereign— 
6 years old ; J. C. Simpson names eh h Hock-hocking, by Ringmaster, dam Young 
Fashion, by imp Monarch— years old ; A. S. Gage names b m Katie Pease, by 
Planet, dam Minnie Mansfield, by imp Glencoe — (1 years old ; Jos. H. Daniels names 
b m Golden Gate, by imp Leamington, dam Napthaby imp Eclipse— 4 years old. The 
horses will be called at half-past one, and will start at two o'clock P.M. The above 
race to be governed by the Rules of the "Pacific Jockey Club." N. B. — Any horse 
fifteen minutes behind time, the others will get the word to go. 

A. J. BRYANT, President. 
John Martin, Secretary. 

The Orcat Four Mile Running Race— To CoraeoflTTnesflay, 
Feb. 22d.— Reserved Seats on the Grand Stand can be secured at the Lick House 
Cigar Stand, and at Henry Schwartz's Cigar Stand, No. 133 Montgomery St, , opposite 
Occidental Hotel. Entrance Tickets can be procured at the following places : Sher- 
man & Hyde's Music Store, corner of Kearny and Sutter streets ; Henry . Schwartz's 
Cigar Stand, No. 133 Montgomery street ; Lick House Saloon ; George Schwartz's 
Cigar Stand, No. 132 Sutter street; Oscar Lewis' Saloon; O P. Willey & Co., No. 
427 Montgomery street ; Swain's Restaurant, No. -630 Market street ; Phil McGovern's 
Saloon, cor. of Market and Kearny streets ; Henry Schwartz's Cigar Stand, No. 329 
Montgomery street, Stevenson Building ; Pantheon Saloon, California street, between 
Sansome and Battery. [Feb. 19.] JOHN MARTIN, Sec. of Pacific Jockey Club. 

NOTICE! NOTICE! 
oar Mile Race.— Reserved Balcony Scats (over the Hotel) to be had at 
GEORGE SCHWARTZ'S CigarStand, 132 Sutter. [Feb. 10.] J. R. DICKEY. 



P 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Consolidated Virginia Mining- Company, San 
Francisco, Feb. 5, 1H70\— At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the above 
named Company, held this day, a dividend (No. 22) of Ten (10) Dollars per sharo was 
declared payable on Friday, 11th hist. Transfer books closed until 11th inst. 
Feb. 19. CHAS. H. FISH, Secretary. 

BRADFORD'S GEEAT PAINTING, 
THE -POLARIS" I1V WINTER QUARTERS, 

IN THANK GOD HARBOR, 

Is now on Exhibition at Morris, Schwab & Co.'s, 19 and 21 Post Street* 

ADMISSION FREE. February 19. 

AET ASSOCIATION. 
icrstartt's Picture, " Sunset on the Headwaters of the 

Green River, Wyoming." Feb. 19. 



B 



PAVILION SKATING. 

General Assemblies will be held in the Mechanics' Pavilion, 
corner Mission and Eighth streets, every Morning from 10 to 12, every After- 
froru 2 to 4J, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Evenings from 8 to 10. (No Assem- 
blies Sundays.) 

ADMISSION PRICES. 

To Morning Assemblies Free | To Evening Assemblies COcts 

To Afternoon Assemblies 25 cts | Tickets in packages of twelve ?4 00 

Use of Skates on all occasions. .... ...... 25 eta Dec. 1.1. 



3, H. CUTTER'S OLD BOURBON AND RYE WKISEY, 
annf actnred by Milton J. Hardy A Co., Sons-in-I^aw and 

Successors of J. H. CUTTER, Louisville, Ky. E. MARTIN & CO., 

August 14. No. 408 Front street, Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



M 



SAK FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1876. 



COLUMN FOR THE CURIOUS, 

In Nature, Science, and Art. 



We breathe in sleep about fifteen times eveiy minute. If the bowels 
are loose lie down in a warm bed, remain there and eat nothing until you 
are well. Do not allow yourself to read a moment in any reclining posi- 
tion, whether in bed or on a sofa. Never swallow an atom of food while 
in a passion, or if under any great mental excitement, whether of a de- 
pressing or elavating character; brutes won't do it. The importance of 
wholesome water and good sewerage to every single dwelling cannot be 
over-estimated, and any city neglecting this vital matter must expect to 
suffer at all times, and particularly when an epidemic of any kind sweeps 
over the country. To be able to lie down at night and fall to sleep within 
ten minutes, and to know no dream or waking until the morning comes, 
and then to bound out of bed full of health, freshness, and good humor, is 
a blessing well worthy the warmest outgushings of a thankful heart 
towards Him who giveth us all things richly to enjoy. The great regulator 
of sleep is exercise ; it is the best anodyne in the universe, and is the only 
one that is always wholesome and natural. If you cannot take much exer- 
cise, take a little, and every second hour increase the distance, and soon 
you will be able to walk a mile more easily than you walked the first hun- 
dred yards. If an action of the bowels does not occur at the usual hour 
eat not au atom until they do act, at least for thirty -six hours ; meanwhile 
drink largely of cold water or hot tea, and exercise in the open air to the 
extent of a gentle perspiration, and keep this up until things are righted ; 
this one suggestion, if practiced, would save myriads of lives every year, 
both in city and country. — From Dr. Bull's Maxims. 

The following interesting personal statistics are from "Who's 
Who " for 167G : The oldest member of Her Majesty's Privy Council is 
the Right Hon. Holt Mackenzie, aged Nil ; the youngest, H. R. H. Prince 
Leopold, aged 23. The oldest duke is the Duke of Portland, aged 76 ; the 
youngest, the Duke of Norfolk, aged 20. The oldest marquis is the Mar- 
quis of Tweeddale, aged S!> ; the voungest, the Marquis of Camden, aged 
4. The oldest earl is the Earl of Leven and Melville, aged 90 ; the young- 
est^ the Earl of Norbury, aged 13. The oldest viscount is Lord Stratford 
de Redcliffe, aged 88 ; the youngest, Viscount Clifden, aged 13. The old- 
est baron is Lord Chelmsford, aged 82 ; the youngest, Lord Southampton, 
aged 9. The oldest of the titled heirs of peers is Viscount Kirkaldy, heir 
to the Earl of Leven and Melville, aged 59 ; the youngest are Viscount 
Crowhurst (heir to the Earl of Cottenham). Viscount Forbes (heir to the 
Earl of Granard), Viscount Kingsborough (heir to the Earl of Kingston), 
and Viscount Stavodale (heir to the Earl of Ilchester), each of whom are 
in their second year. The oldest member of the House of Commons is the 
Right Hon. Joseph Warner Henley, M. P. for Oxfordshire, aged 83 ; the 
youngest, the Hon. William F. O. O'Callagan, M. P. for Tipperary. aged 
23. The oldest judge in England is the Right Hon. Sir Fitzroy Kelly, 
Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer, aged 80 years ; the young- 
est, the Right Hon. Sir George Jessel, Master of the Rolls, aged 52. 

Two French chemists, MM. Persoz and Jeanolle, have taken out a 
patent for making ink for letter-press printing, lithography, and auto- 
graphy from the refuse of the gas works, from other tar, the heavy oils of 
petroleum, resin, wood, etc. The inventors say that these substances 
present valuable qualities for the purpose, that they mix readily with 
lampblack and other dry colors in powder, and that the ink made from 
them has the great advantage of neither penetrating the paper nor spread- 
in..', and lastly that it may be mixed in any desired proportions with the 
fatty oils for certain classes. For black ink for typographic printing the 
inventors use what they call evaporated tar, or liquid pitch, with lamp- 
black or Prussian blue, in the following proportions: Tar, 100 parts ; 
lampblack, 36 parts ; Prussian blue, 10 parts ; glycerine, 10 parts. For 
colored inks they use the heavy oils, purified as far as possible from the 
tarry matters, which give a brown tint, with the coloring matter in pow- 
der. — Eitgtish Mechanic. 

A Delicate Radiometer. — At a soiree of the President of the Royal 
Society, Dr. William Crookes exhibited an extremely sensitive radiometer, 
with which he was enabled to perform the novel experiment of producing 
mechanical motion in vacuo through the agency of the rays proceeding 
from a candle flame at some distance from the apparatus. The following 
is a brief description of this ingenious device : It consists of a glass stem 
supporting a four-bladed windmill carrying four disks, one at each extrem- 
ity of the four slender glass rays. These work horizontally and are sup- 
ported by a steel point on a small topaz. The apparatus is placed in a 
small glass globe exhausted of air, and the radiations from a flame of an 
ordinary^ candle placed at some distance away is sufficient to cause it to 
rotate with great liveliness. 

Caloric Engines. — The engine invented by Mr. F. Brown, of New 
York, consists of a fuel reservoir combined with a hot-air f urnance, and of 
an air-jacket combined with doors leading one into the combustion chamber 
and the other into the ashbox of the furnace, and of a packing combined 
with a cylinder and plunger, the latter being provided with a concave 
bearing combined with a knuckle on the end of the piston-rod, which fits 
the said concave bearing, forming a receptacle for oil ; and, lastly, of an 
air-escape channel combined with an air-pump which branches from the 
air-channel leading to the air-furnaie. 

Electric Submerged Lamp. — A balloon-shaped glass vessel, pro- 
tected by a metal cage, is, according to the invention of Messrs. Chauvin, 
Goizet & Aubry, of Paris, hermetically closed, preferably by an India rub- 
ber plug. The plug is traversed by two metal rods isolated electrically. 
At the ends of these rods two ends of a platinum thread rolled into a spiral 
are fixed, which when traversed by the electric current is heated to incan- 
descence and emits light. The generating pile is contained in a separate 
box, and conductors communicate the established current to the platinum 
thread. 

Wbitefield, the great evangelist, has been dead a hundred years, but 
it is with difficulty he has been kept in the crypt where his body was laid, 
in the old church in Newburyport. Parts of' his skeleton and chips from 
his tomb have been carried away by relic- hunters, and the sexton has 
orders to watch every visitor. Somebody once stole one of the arms, but, 
after being taken across the Atlantic, it was returned with a letter of pen- 
itence from the thief. The box in which it was sent is now kept hi the 
coffin. 



INSURANCE AGENCY OF 
HUTCHINSON, MANN & SMITH. 

CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FKAXCISCO. 

AGENTS FOB Tllfc 

Franklin Ins. Co Indianapolis, Ind New Orleans Ins. Ass'n .... .New Orleans. 



Penn Fire Ins. Co Philadelphia. 

St. Paul F. & M. Ins. Co. ..St. Paul, Minn. 

AU:ls [n& Co Hartford Colin. 

St. Nicholas Ins. Co New York 



People's Ins. Co Memphis, Tcnn 

Home ins. Co Columhus, ( 'hio 

People's Ins. Co Newark, N. J. 

National h. I. Co., U. S. A.-Washn, D. 

Capital Represented, Twelve Millions. 

POLICIES ISSUED ON DESIRABLE PROPERTY AT FAIR RATES. LOSSES 
EQUITABLY ADJUSTED AND PROMPTLY PAID. 

HUTCHINSON, MANN & SJHTH. General Agents, 

Dec. 5. 314 California street, San Fran 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 
~VT<>- 406 California street, next door to Bank of California. 

J^i Fire Insurance Company. Capital, $800,000. OPV1CBRJB :— J. F. Houghton, 
President ; Geo. H. Howard, Vice-President; Charles R. Story, Secretary. H. H. 
DIGELOW, General Manager. 

DmBOXOBB. — San Francisco — Geo. H. Howard, F. D. Atherton, H. F. Tescheniacher, 
A. B. Qrogan, John H. Redington, A. w. Bowman, c. S. Hobbs, B. 11 Hortshorne, 
D. Conrad. Win. H. Moor, George S. Johnaon, H. N. Tilden, \V. M. Greenwood, S. L. 
Jones, George S. Mann, Cyrus Wilson, W. H. Foster, Jr., Joseph Galloway, W. T. 
Garratt, C. waterhouse, A. P. Hotaling. Oregon Branch— P. Wasserman, B, Gold- 
smith, L. F Grover, D. Macleay, C. H. Lewis. Lloyd Brooke. J. A. Crawford, l>. M. 
French, J. Lowenberg. Hamilton Boyd, Manager, W. L. Ladd, Treasurer. Marys- 
ville— D. E. Knight. San Diego — A. H. Wilcox. Sacramento Branch — Charles 
Crocker, A. Redington, Mark Hopkins, James Oarolan, J. F. Houghton, D. W. Karl, 
I^aae Lohman, Julius Wetzlar ; Julius Wetzlar, Manager; i. Lohman, Secretary. 
Stockton Branch— H. U. Hewlett. George S. Evans, J. D. Peters. N. M. Orr, W. F. 
McKee, A. W. Simpson, A. T. Hudson, H. M. Fanning ; H. H. Hewlett. Manager ; N. 
M. Orr, Secretary. San Jose Branch— T. Ellard Beans, Josiah Belden, A. Poster, J. 
S. Carter, Jackson Lewis, N. Hayes, Noah Palmer, B. D. Murphy , J. J. Denny, Man- 
ager ; A. E. Moody, Secretary. Grass Valley— William Watt, Robert Watt. Ne- 
vada — T. W. Sigourney, Feb. 17. 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Fire and Marine.— C. W. HellosS". President ; diaries A. 
Laton, Secretary. Cash Assets, January 1st, 1875, S_58,89_91. 1'. 
W. W. Dodge, of W. W. Dodge & Co., Merchants; Claus Spreckels, President Cal- 
ifornia Sugar Refinery ; Selden S. Wright, Judge County Court ; w. B. Cummings, of 
W. B. Gumming- & Co., Merchants ; Bartlett Doc-, of B. Si J. S. Doc, Manufacl i 
Frank Eastman, Printer ; C. W. Kell'.gg. of Wilnierding \ Kellogg, Merchants ; A. 
W. Jee, Merchant; Peter Dean, Capitalist; John H. Wise, of Christy & Wise, Mer- 
chants ; C. J. Deermg, of Deering £ Co., Merchants ; Levi Stevens, of Stevens, Ba- 
ker & Co., Merchante: A. J. Pope, of Pope & Talbot, Shin Owners, etc; Charles 
Main, of Main 8: Winchester, Merchants ;B. G. Crane, of Hayes, Hastings & Co., 
Merchants ; W. L. Elliott, U. S. A. ; George L. Bradley, Capitalist Sacramento: 
H. S. Crocker, of H. S. Crocker & Co., Merchants ; N. D. Thaver, Capitalist ; F. S. 
Freeman, of Woodland, Capitalist ; D. H. Haskell, C. P. R. It. Office in San Fran- 
cisco : No. 32S California street, Tallant's New Bank Building, N. E. comer Califor- 
nia and Battery streets. May 22. 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE— UN1CN J>lS. CO. OF S. F- 

The California Lloyds.— Established in 1SG1.— Nos. 41f>nnd 
41S California street. Cash capital $750,000 in Gold. Assets exceed $1,000,000 

Coin. Fair Kates ! Prompt Settlement of Loses ! ! Solid Security ! ! DIRECTORS. 
—San Francisco— J. Mora Moss, James Otis, Mosses Heller, Hf. J. T. Dana. M. J. 
O'Connor, W. W. Montague, Daniel Meyer, Adam Grant, Antoiue Borel, Charles 
Kohler, Joseph Seller, W. Ralston, I. Lawrance Pool. A, Weill, X. 6. Kittle, Jabcz 
Howes, Nicholas Luning, John Parrott, Milton S. Latham, J. Baum, M. D. Sweeney, 
Joseph Brandenstein, Gustave Tone-hard, G. Brignardello, George C. Hickox. T. Lem- 
men* Meyer, J. H. Baird, T. E. Lindcuberger. Sacramknto— Edw. Cadwalader, J. F. 
Houghton, L. A. Booth. HAUTSVILLB— L. Cunnigham, Peter Decker. Portland, O. — 
Henry Failing. New York — J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, James Phelan. 

GUSTAVE TOL'CHARD, President. N. G. KITTLE, Vice-President. 

Charles D. Haven, Secretary: Geo. T. Boiiek, Surveyor. Oct. 20. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE CO. 
FIKE AXD MARINE. 

C^laslt Assets. 8450,000. — Principal Office, 409 California 
J street, San Francisco. OPFlCBBfi :— Peter Donahue, President ; A J. Bryant, 
Vice-President ; Charles H. Cdshing, Secretary. Board op Directors : — Peter Dona- 
hue, James Irvine, C. D. O'Sullivan, J. D. Cougnlin, B. Harrison, A. H. Rutherford, 
R. Bailey, E. W. Corhert, George O. McMullin, A. J. Bryant. Frank M. Pixley, E Burke, 
H. H. Watson, Alexander Austin, P. J. White, W. A Piper, M Mayhlum, Richard 
Iver8, John Rosenfeld. P. H. Russell, Sacramento. John 0. Downey, F. P. F. Tem- 
ple, Los Angeles. Wm. Bihler, Sonoma County. H. W. Seale MayBeld. C. T. Br- 
and, San Jose. Feb. 13. 

NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY. FiRE AND MARINE. 

Established 1850*. Capital 95,000.000: Paiil l'p Capital, 
$1,200,000; Surplus Assets, $874,489. Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 
Underwrite, through the medium of their Agents, against Joss by fire of every de- 
scription, and for voyage or time on Hulls, Merchandise, Freights, etc., to and from 
all parts of the world, at the current rates of premium, claims adjusted and paid 
in San Francisco, London, Glasgow, or any of the Company's Australian or New Zea- 
land offices, at the option of the insured. HUGH CRAIG, 
May 1. Agent for California, No. 807 California street. 

NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., OF BOSTON, 

Hns transacted the business of Life Insurance for nearly 
thirty-five years. Its assets amount to over Fourteen Million Dollars. The 
law of Massachusetts makes all its Policies nonforfeitable. It is a Purely Mutual Com- 
pany, dividing every cent of surplus among Policy-holders. This is the Only Com- 
pany on the Pacific Coast governed by the Massachusetts Lapse Law. This company 
has complied with the new Insurance Laws of California. 

WALLACE EVERSON, General Agent. 
April 23.] 313 Montgomery street, Nevada Block. 

FIREMAN'S FUND INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Losses Paid— »3, 820.000.-— A sterling: California Co., with 
a national reputation for promptness and fair dealing, gained during thirteen 
years of service. Assets— -$753,407 57. 

D. J. STAPLES, President ; ALPHEUS BULL, Vice-President. 
Geo. D. Dorlv, Sec. ; W. J. J>ottos, Ass't Sec. Jan. 29. 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

("lanital S5, OOO, OOO.— Agents: Balfour, Gutlirie «fc Co., Xo. 
j E30 California street. San Francisco. No, 1 8. 



NORTHERN ASSURANCE COMPANY, OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN 

Subscribed Capital, $15,000,000 ; Accumulated Funds, up- 
ward > of {8,750,000 ; Annual Fire Premiums, less re-insurance, sl.KsO.OOO. 
Losses promptly paid in United States Gold Coin. W. L BOOKER, Agent, 

April 13. No. 319 California street, San Francisco. 



Fab. 19, I 



OALLFORNTA ADVERTISER. 



•WATCH YD." 

■ 

smile 

Wh*ll ma lire nigh, 

And yi bath shaded ; 

but bloom t" die, 

And hope's l«ri :lit. bow hath faded; 
Oh! watch khon kfien, lest anxious care 
, and rankle there. 

il and woo, 

Through days of mirth and m 
Where'er thy wanderia yo — 

Oh! think now tnuuiant here I 

Thy Borrow and thy gladness : 
And watch thou w.w.w rtray 

From him who points the heavenward way, 

MARRIAGE OF COTJSINa 
Editor of " Public Opinion "— h er to your correepoi 

ilieiiHu " »uu " (me in Particular/* it can only be said as 1 
.. of Kuglaml, that it doea not forbid the marriage of cousins, more 
pity ; and it a clergyman refuses to marry cousins, they can be ef- 
ly uiiti I- -rally limrneil at the registrar's, t<> the injury of the human 
that ia, their children, if they have any, and their children's chil- 
nd how much farther we know not It has nothing to do with a 
senility," "antiquarian learning," 
»>r "ecclesiastical law," but a law of nature, which cannot be infringed 
without the penalty being unforced, we do not know how many genera- 
tions down on mankind in general. It "Iocs not matter much what the op- 
position side says, unless they can bring statistics to show that the chil- 
dren of consanguine' itr »ng vitally and mentally, and as 
in other ways as others, which it is tolerably certain they are not, 
nearly all disinterested students of the subject admit. It may he 
Lin that consanguinity of any sort is detrimental to the off- 
be only a natural consanguinity, or likeness in tena- 
nt without M . it is detrimental, though perhaps not 
rly or demonstrably as among other blood relations, especially if 
of similar temperaments. The marriage of relations is, perhaps, worse 
linong the poor and ignorant than among the rich and educated, because 

the ] r have more children than the rich. *Dr. J. H. Stallard told the 

of Arts (see Star, December 6, 1867), that for one thousand per- 
sons in St. George's, Hanover-square, there were twenty-five births per 
Spear, while for the poor district of St. George-in-the-JEast there were 
Shirty-five births in the same number. If when cousins married they had 
only one or two children, there would not be so much danger, and the 
eema to hold good with other marriages where the blood resembles 
in temperament, for there is good ground for the belief that man and 
wife become consanguineous the longer they live together. A§ regardseither 
this or the marriage of relations, people need not follow any writer or 
, but facts. Let them quietly and patiently look around them, as 
I have done ; look out for married cousins, or other consanguineous pairs, 
and see if there are not more lame, blear-eyed, defective-fingered, etc., 
children than in the rest of the population. I could quote statistics by the 
I >m the United States, the Continent of Europe, and Great Britain, 
hut it would take too mu. h space, and will refer any one who wishes to 
study the subject to Dr. Boudin, m his report to the French Academy 
thenreum, No. 1,810, Aug 1C, 1862, and No. 2,000, Feb. 24, 1800). It 
is stated in some recently-collected statistics that the marriages of first 
cousins in England and Ireland are in London about H per cent., in the 
Urban districts about 2, in the rural districts about 2|, in the landed gen- 
try about 3A, and in the aristocracy propably 4J per cent. Of course this 
Would not be the measure of the mischief, as the English aristocracy 
pasa away, as any one may see by going- over the lists and seeing 
how very few old families there are. This is a very great subject, in- 
timately connected with the rise and fall of nations. I have seen a crowd 
of villagers on Mount Cenis all look so much alike that they might be 
taken for brothers and sisters. Idiots are very common in such places, 
and if by chance a road is made through such a place and strangers get in, 
ue soon less idiots born in proportion than before. I shall much 
like to see any figures or facts in strong controversion to this. I think 

freat nations get their strength and force out of mixed blood ; they rise, 
loom, become conservative, and pass away, cither by their own inanition 
or their weakened power of resistance to some other race or family who 
absorb them or improve them off the face of the earth. 

Yours respectfully, Inca. 

■We conjrratulate the inhabitants of San Francisco on the permanent residence of 
tliis* physician in our city. 

YE STJNDAY SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT. 

He is a truly good deacon who cusses and cheats on week-days, and 
dispenses grace, lollipops and tracts to embryotic angels on Sunday. Keeps 
his hand in at the vices with a self-sacrificing zeal, so that he may the bet- 
ter preach virtue to the innocents. For the children to miss the lesson of 
the day is a grievous fault — to visit other denominations a crime. He is 
the man who runs the parson ; the parson runs the congregation, and the 
congregation runs in debt. The sisters of the flock think him so nice, but 
the worldly-minded brethren who have had their eye-teeth cut, remember 
that last stock transaction, and mutter fraud, humbug, bilk, dead-beat and 
other pious but endearing epithets. He never puts up any job on the li- 
brary fund — oh, no !— nor makes the sexton or janitor divvy — not he— but 
waits till there's a fat contract to be let. and goes in cahoots with the con- 
tractor. No lowly thoughts for him — his aspirations are all heavenward, 
which don't prevent his cottoning on to the little patrician, nor neglecting 
plebian brats. We wonder what a Divine Providence created Sunday 
School Superintendents for, unless that their deluded pupils might after- 
wards remember them as the most consummate humbugs who ever escaped 
kicking from a religious jaasack. 



DROPPING INTO POETRY. 
Did the young ladies who drop Into 

th. ever hear 
woman who refill i Iruff-and-Ulu 

■ 

It, and i' id ■ .lid not 

■ 

publisher. Mr. Longman, and remarked thai 
a bo,.k that was really wanted. " The world doi i ool want poem 
this wise woman. Mr. Lor han hinted at acooki 

this extraordinary person, instead of flying En ■ re :■■ end asking. " shall 1 
write ab.mt tarts who hai . diately 

went off and wrote one of the best oookj toothed e bun" 

gry man. < on Mighty accumulation i 

ee their mild jingles in th 

that a good so BSanter thing than a 

into Sentiment W io York '''<>'■ 

A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF A FEW OF THE MEMBERS OF 

THE S. F- STOCK AND EX- THE PACIFIC STOCK EX- 

CHANGE BOARD. CHANGE BOARD. 



OOl I iu:.t\i: President. 

r. ir. BOITYNGJE-- Fice-Prea't. 
it. sen mi i:i>i:ll --Treaeurer. 

V . LA WTOX - Secretary. 

It. II. COIT - Chairman. 

Austin, Alexander, or J. M. Wa k r 
& i-'o 30:1 Montp'yet. 

Budd, W. C 'Mil California Bt. 

Burling&Bro 323 California st. 

Boswell, S. B 307 California ?t. 

Cahill, E -lUti Montgomery st. 

Charles, H. A 408 Montgomery st. 

Cope, TJhler & Co Montgomery at. 

Coll Deane No. lfi, Nevada Block. 

Eyre, E E 31 1 Montgomery st. 

Glover, G. F. M 430 California st. 

Greenebaum, J 413 California st. 

Hassey, F. A 402 Montgomery st. 

Hart, Henry 412 Montgomery at. 

Hall, Ed. F 410 California st. 

Herr, J. J 4il California et. 

Hooker, B. C 42(i Montgomery st. 

Jones, J.H 509 California st. 

Keene, J- R 435 California st. 

King, Jos. L 406% California et. 

Lynch, J HO Leidesdorffst. 

Latham, Jas. H 411 California et. 

Marina, E. J. De S., with I. Glazier 
& Co 426 Montgomery st. 

Noble, H- H 435 California st. 

Peckham, E. P 413 California st. 

Parker, W. C 112 Leidesdorffst. 

Perry, Jr., Jno 100 Leidesdorffst. 

Shawhan, J. E 432 Montg'y st. 

Sherwood, B. F 40G,!tf California et. 

Schmieden, i/ochstadter & Co 

401 California st. 

Smiley, G- W 444 California st. 

Shotwell, J. M 311 Montgomery st. 

Turnbull, W 410% California st. 

Wakefield, S B 503 California st. 



/:. .7. n.tl.JHI IX }>r<-si<hnt. 

GEO. S. IH)IU;E - - 1 irr-I'rrn't. 

0. r. WIOKOX ZVeoswrer. 

A. .1. MOULDER Heer ctorj/, 

jos. Tii,i>i;x Chatoman, 

Baldridge, M 

Barton, Robert 

Berry, F. tf 418 Montgomery nt. 

Bourne, J. B 116 Halleck at. 

De Greayer, S 308 Sansoiue st. 

Dodge, George S 

Finlayson, J. B raciflc Exchange 

Building, Halleck street. 

Hickox, A. A Halleck's Building. 

Hearst, George 

Hoight, IraG 421 Montgomery st. 

Hunt, J.L 306 San some fit. 

Lent, William M 

Marks, Joseph 

Mauldin, Hugh 

Moulder, A. J 

Martin, M. S 307 California Bt. 

McCoppin, F 320 Montgomery Bt. 

Moroney, Paul 8 Halleck 6t. 

Nash, J 405 H California et. 

Neal, »harles S 

Palmer, E. F 413 California st. 

Plummer, H. W 

Riolte, E. N 

Rich. Dave 422 Montgomery st. 

Sanborn, T. G 

Sutro, Gustave 

Swift, Frank 

Smiley, T. J. L 314 Montgomery st. 

Scofield, D. G 315 California st. 

Taylor, A. C... -4113d Cal'a st., room 2. 

Tyng, Geo 309 Cal'a st., rooms 8-9. 

Van Ness, Thomas C 

Willard, G. H 309 California et. 



OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

For Japan and China, leave wharf, comor First and Bran- 
nan streets, at noon, for YOKOHAMA AND HONGKONO, commuting; at Yo- 
kohama with Steamers for Shanghai. 

GAELIC March 16th and June 16th. 

OCEANIC April 17th and July 17th. 

BELGIC May 10th and August 16th. 

Cabin Plans on Exhibition, and Passage Tickets for sale at No. 3 New Mont- 
gomery street. For Freight, apply at the Pacific -Mail Steamship Company's Wharf. 
T. H. GOODMAN, General Passenger Agent. 
GEORGE H. BRADBURY, President. Feb. 19. 

FOR ARIZONA AND MEXICAN PORTS. 

For Cape St. tuci*, i1I;iz:ttlitn, La I'i-.t. tiuaymao mid the Colorado 
Kiver, touching at Magdalena Bay, should eulliclent inducement offer — The 

Steamship Captain, will leave for the above ports on 

at V-i o'clock M., from Folsom-strcet Wharf, connecting 

at the Month of the Colorado with the Steamboats and Barges of the Colorado 
Stt-'am Navigation Company for all points on the River. Through Bills of Lading 
will be tarnished and none others signed. Freight will be received on Monday. 
27th Instant. No freight received for Mexican Ports alter Friday noon, and Bills of 
Lading for those [torts must be accompanied by Custom-house and Consular 
Clearances. For freight or passage apply to 
March 6. B. M. H ARTS HORNE. GlQ Front street. 

PHILADELPHIA LINE. 

Philadelphia to San Francisco. —-The Favorite Clipper Ship 
CARRIER DOVE, Robert Merryman, Commander. Tins vessel is now in berth, 
will have prompt dispatch, and be followed by other first-class vessels. For freight 
apply in Philadelphia to H. L. GREGG & CO., 108 Walnut street, or here and in New 
York to [Feb. 12.]____ WJI. T. COLEMAN & CO. _ 

SANITARY WATER CLOSETS. 

Jenning's Patent London Water Closet, American Defiance 
Patent Water Closet, Carr'3 Eastern Patent Water Closet, Smith's California 
Patent Water Closet, and all late improvements in Sanitary Traps, etc. 

Fe b. 12. THOMAS DAY, l±2 and 124 Sutter street. 

ROBERT GE n RGE- Accountant 

Room 1, Sherman's Building, 606 Montgomery street. [July 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1876. 



SILVER 

The daily press has seen fit to talk more than its usual infinite deal of 
nothing about the prevailing discount on silver coin. The only obscurity 
about the question lies in its simplicity. The people who own silver bars 
will sell them in whatever way they can to realize the most money. For 
some time past they have been able to net a better price by turning them 
into Trade dollars "and selling these at 3 to 4 per cent discount than they 
could by shipping the bars to Europe or to China for sale. Consequently 
they have turned as much of their bars into " Trades" as the market would 
take, lowering their price from point to point as they found the public 
" filled np " at each successive rate. The " Trades " at the present discount 
of 4% are about equivalent to the present foreign price ; so, if the European 
rate declines no further, ' ' Trades " will stand at 96 cents, gold. The peo- 
ple who own bars are not going to turn them into " Trades " to be sold at 
a price which will net them less money than the bars would turn in if 
sold abroad ; and, on the other hand, if the foreign market declines 
further, the owners of bars wilt turn them into " Trades " so long as these 
can be sold at a rate equivalent to the net out-turn of foreign shipments. 
The remedy for this state of things is for the Government, if it chooses, to 
decline manufacturing Trade dollars for private account. Theoretically, 
the Government ought not to hesitate to do this. Silver being tbe inferior 
currency will drive out gold to the extent of its own introduction beyond 
a mere token circulation. The operation of this currency law was dis- 
closed at the late meeting of the Retail Grocers' Association. This body 
resolved (quite properly) to do business on a silver basis— that is, they will 
deal in terms of the inferior medium and make merchandise of the superior 
one — gold. They will quote sugar in terms of silver money, and quote 
gold at a premium of 4% ; in other words, they will deal as the people of 
the East do with their inferior medium — paper. Up to this time, we have 
taken only the first step in the downward track ; but let the silver coiu 
become plenty enough and the butcher and dry-goods shop must follow the 
grocers. The process is, that sugars selling at 20 cents the pound will be 
sold at 21 cents, and goods sold at 50 cents the yard will be sold at 55 
cents. The dealer always has the sabe to mark up his goods more than 
enough to cover the depreciation in the standard ; but wages remain un- 
changed, and the only substantial effect is that each 50 dollars of wages 
only buys about what was 45 (gold) dollars worth of goods. So be it. 
Fifteen cents will still buy one JVew* Letter, and the amount of annual sub- 
scription will continue to be exacted in gold ; so that after all the " silver 
standard" will not make much real difference in those greater human in- 
terests that concern the immortal soul. Selah ! 

us. 

The gelid truth is, that had it not been for our mining dividends dur- 
ing the past three years, we should be a busted community to-day. We 
have had three bad crop years, during which interior tride has gone steadily 
from bad to worse. "The street*' continues to be solvent, and more than 
solvent ; it is strong, because, luckily for itself, " the street" has always 
owned and to-day owns a good block of mining stocks, and gets away 
every month with a solid slice of the regular dividends. It has been " in," 
too, on the big rises and realized its share of the profits then secured. 
It made money on Belcher and Crown Point and the Bonanzas. There 
was a time when a man's credit was not helped by the knowledge that he 
" dabbles in mining stocks," as we used to phrase it; but at this time, 
and for three years past, it has helped a man s credit to be known as the 
owner of a dab in the fat things. Some of the men who stand strongest 
to-day are those who are known to receive a snug monthly Con. Virginia 
checks The " street" is conservative after its fashion, in its dabbling. It 
is fond of selling off on the rise until it holds a residuum that has cost it 
nothing, and it puts that away, with amazing constancy of mind, " to 
soak." It might draw dividends for seven years and go to a thousand 
dollars a share ; the street will draw its dividend with unflagging Zealand 
never sell a cent's worth. Dividends quit — the street gives away the 
shares to operators for what they will fetch. And this sort of thing has 
saved the street in the past bad years, and is the source of its stability 
and strength to-day. Interior trade in California has been nearly as bad 
as it has at the East, where the whole establishment has gone to the 
demnition bow-wows ; but those fellows have not had a stream of sixty 
millions of good dollars a year pouring into every town of a quarter mil- 
lion people to compensate for bad trade and keep things going. At the 
present time our outlooks have taken a turu ; we have a prospect that 
thirty days will convert to certainty, of a perfectly awful grain crop. We 
shall realize a great deal of money from it ; and still the mining stream 
will continue. Trade will be profitable, as well as mining ; and one of 

the immediate effects of this is as obvious|as the dye on Judge *s 

hair ; it will promote a movement in real estate. Suppose it does require 
another eight years to get up a speculation and a craze and a smash ; they 
will be eight years of steady rise and famous " operations," during which 
to him that hath, shall be given ; and at the end, from him that hath not, 
shall be taken away even that which he hath — and serve hi-m right, for a 
poor man is worse than a thief. 

~SMAT.T. POTATOES. 
After a man has held a prominent position in a community as 
limited in numbers as ours for a quarter of a century, he is not likely to 
be absolutely unknown, and any nntice of him as such by a public jour- 
nal evidences either gross ignorance or Btudied impertinence. The Alta 
California, last Saturday, in its report of a case before Judge Louderback, 
refers to the well-known Mare Island pilot as " one Harrison." Now, if 
our memory serves us right, there was a time when that journal never 
gave an account of any vessel of war going to the Navy Yard without a 
glowing description of the masterly and seaman-like manner in which she 
was handled by Captain Harrison. Has Saucelito and McCrellish any- 
thing to do with this sudden change ? How is it that this man Dillon 
Noyes, who was mate on the Saucelito boat under the MacC malad- 
ministration, gets an appointment from the Navy department in violation 
of the Act of Congress delegating to States the power to make their own 
pilot laws and appoint their own pilot ? MacCrellish has a wonderful 
talent for obtaining important offices for his creatures. It was he who 
procured the post of bum-boat man for the State of California from the 
Secretary of the Navy. It was he who, in his great benevolence, em- 
ployed counsel to defend Noyes, and who went bail for the appearance of 
the prisoner to receive sentence. Baffled in his Saucelito schemes, check- 
mated in his culpable blunders, MacCrellish seeks a petty revenge by dirty 
little annoyances and unworthy insinuations. 



FAIR. 



If "handsome is as handsome does,' 

Should h^ a maxim true, 
What very gracious, pretty acts 

This gentleman must do ; 
If "handsome does as handsome is' 

Should likewise be a fact, 
It must be very hard for him 

To do an ugly act. 



We're not disposed to quarrel much 

With that which is our lot, 
Nor do we wish to envy those 

Who have what we have not. 
But, really, it would seem that man 

Has more than his just share, [name 
Whose fortune, fame, acts, face and 

Are all so very Fair. 



The Bible is a goodly book, 

But this Bonanza King 
A bank-book owns which some would hold 

A far more precious thing; 
The Trinity above are good 

To have for friends; but yet — 
O'Brien, Makay, Flood and Fair — 

We '11 join that quartette. 

WATER. 

The ingenuous mind which animates the mortal part of State Senator 
Donovan hath evolved from its inner consciousness a bill designed to se- 
cure to the people of San Francisco a copious supply of pure water. Of 
the purity of motive and singleness of purpose of State Senator Donovan 
there is happily no question. There is a simplicity, a freshness, an inno- 
cency about his little bill unattainable to the resources of merely finite 
craft. Its most striking feature is that which provides for the advertise- 
ment of proposals for the water works in Vienna. This is not Vienna in 
Illinois ; it is Vienna in Austria. The trained imagination essays to pic- 
ture the mental condition to which the Viennese public would be reduced 
by tbe appearance of the advertisement in question : "Woistdenn 
eigentlich dieses San Francisco ?" " Esistin Brazilien." " Wein dumme, 
es ist in Ireland." " Ach Gott ! diese Anzeigung ist einen Fenianer idee. " 
And the Austrian Foreign Office will address a minute to the American 
Ambassador directing His Excellency's attention to the suspicious docu- 
ment, and " having the honor to be," etc. Plainly, State Senator Dono- 
van has imperfectly foreseen the tremendous international consequences 
that lurk in his amiable — not to say aimless — little bill. Similar provision 
is made for the insertion of like advertisements in Philadelphia and other 
American places. Here we are at home, and so will the proposed con- 
tractors be. We submit a pro forma abstract of the resulting " estimate n 
from these enterprising parties : 

ESTIMATE ON WAT^R CONTRACT. 

DR. CR. 

To fare of self and pals (three) to San Fran- 
cisco, and three months at Palace Hotel.. $4,500 00 

To wages of local lobby three months 5,400 00 

To Civil Engineer for " report " 6,000 00 

To " sundries " including newspapers and 
Supervisors for vote " passing to print ". . 26,200 00 

Total §42,100 00 

By received from Spring Valley Water Company to withdraw 

(one-half stock, one-half cash) $250,000 00 

Less discount on stock at 8 per cent 10,000 00 

Total $240,000 00 

Net profit §197,900 00 

On the whole we incline to think that Senator Donovan's advertisement 
would lead to " business." And why not? Keally the Spring Valley 
Company can stand 8250,000 and not feel it, as the saying is ; and §250,- 
000 would be quite a pretty thing to help tide " the boys " over the dull 
season. There are possibilities in Senator Donovan's bill that do not 
show upon the surface, and as a workable lode of reasonable promise we 
commend it to the favorable consideration of Mr. Zeke Wilson and his 
pals. 

PRIVILEGES OF CABINET OFFICERS. 

The privilege enjoyed by British Cabinet officers of participating 
in the parliamentary debates when their departments are under discus- 
sion is one that might well be adopted in the United States. It tends to 
dignify the office and to enforce the officer's better acquaintance with his 
charge. Members of the Federal Cabinet may now be utterly oblivious 
to public opinion, but bring them face to face with the representatives of 
the people, and they will speedily find the necessity of conceding popular 
demands. It would be well if the House could enforce their resignations 
when necessary. An unpopular President and Cabinet may now thwart 
the will of the people, but make this same Cabinet dependent upon the 
pleasure of the House, and we shall soon ensure a desirable administra- 
tion. These changes could also be adopted with benefit by the several 
States. If Europe has much to learn from us in popular government, we 
have a great deal to learn from Europe in thorough administration. 



POLL TAXES. 

And now comes the truly good Tax Collector, informing us that owing 
to certain delinquencies, certain delinquents must pay four dollars for the 
privilege of wearing a head. Chinese, niggers, and poor white trash are 
thus to be made happy by enjoying a temporary equality with the for- 
getful millionaire. This anatomy tax is a great thing, and so equalzing in 
its effects. As this is a free country, every man has a right to propose a 
new tax system. Suppose we abolish all other taxes and levy on the 
human form itself? That can't be hid. Say S2 for a head, SI apiece 
for arms and legs, §4 for the grosser parts ; total, S10 per man, woman, and 
child. Babies unborn to be let off at half price. This would give a State 
revenue of seven to eight millions yearly. Statesmen of the Laine and 
Wilcox breed could be exempted from the $2 head tax because they don't 
own any. Will old Pub Morals Martin oblige us by introducing this all- 
sufficient anatomy tax ? 

A correspondent writes this query : " Couldn't you put Mr. Caleb 
T. Fay in " Men We Know," with a list of offices he has hankered after ? 
On second thought, the list could only be approximate, or it would fill an 
entire issue." 



19, 1878.] 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER, 



9 



THE TOWN CRIER. 

\\ • ■ . <. . .1 ,rt thoot" 

"Um that will tilajr th* d*»tl, air. wild ><<u " 



Mr. D. McCarthy, the " editor and proprietor " t»f ttu \ 

ii who in ilidthtcd to .1 COtMtitll 

want* bad whisky (or a breath adequately lugneting ■ oertain meuhltJo 
■ ! absence from ai a i erlj li:.* f..r 

rammer and spelling. The fact that a man ii 
i mental aiierbrtone that 

ti ii in the wiuiu degree that it pi... 

thrust upon one in the sua] ( coarse impu- 

-uierrluous virtue. There are on nil 
txwutt .v i>( loud-mouthed bogtrotters, loafera by tnheritanos, 

.tii. I lickspittles by selection, who.bg :*r break of fortune, 

always manage to afflict raral oommunitiee ai editor of some little 
hundred ropy paper or other, The cttrtingujahing trait of then gentry iu 
tlii-* editorial intermiaaion of their oareer from the steerage to the peniten- 
- invariably the gratification ol the loafers' first insthuri ol abusing 
table people. One of these-scissor brained scribblers is " Dirty M:u-." 
A rnstingnisnea member <>f our oommonily, and one who's best wealth is 
aha gratitude and respect of a people he has served with the nobleeteelf- 
e, took ;t trip to Virginia City the other day. accompanied by a 
i tv of ladies and gentlemen. Inspired by the noble rage incident 
upon the refusal of this gentleman to consign ■ certain railroad adver- 
it to the oblivion of the Chronicle's columns, the combination of 
Journalistic mendacity and mm that edits it vented his spleen in an attack 
ui*hi the gentleman above mentioned that was an outrage upon decency, 
and a keen mortification to the hospitable people <>f the great mining town. 
The open-handed -we might say open-armed, hospitality of the Virginia 
City people i* too proverbial for comment even, and how they permit 
itupid ami gratuitous affronts to be offered to a visitor by this sore- 
handed butcher or the King's English we rail to understand. When they 
decide to rid their community "i this man McCarthy— whose paper dis- 
graces them every day— by the cheerful ministrations of the good old 
.:<■ system, we shall write the obituary— we had almost said the 
iffspring of obituary— of this Pariah of the pen-drivers gentle craft, 
with peculiar pl<»asure. 

Mr. T. Symington Ott, the gentleman who had the misfortune to be 
considerably lacerated by the News Letur dog on Monday last, sends us a 
letter, which has also been published in a daily paper, in which he conde- 
scendingly offers to abstain Erom prosecuting the proprietors of this paper 
on condition that something is said by us in the way of apology that will 
be " agreeable to the feelings of the family." Contemplating the fact that 
this magnanimous individual was cautioned not to go alone into the room 
containing the dog, and considering the other circumstance that this lacer- 
ated Demon had no earthly business in our office at the time, except the 
gratuitous occupation of reading our exchanges to rags and boring the edi- 
tor to madness, this highmindnees is cool, not to say refreshing. That 
Mr. Ott received such severe injuries, we are, in the abstract, sincerely 
sorry for, but as to our assuming auy responsibility whatever for the acci- 
dent that confines him to his bed, the idea is simply absurd and ridiculous. 
We have striven ineffectually to impress certain parties who regard this 
office as a sort of public loafing room that their visitations are more hon- 
ored in the breach than in the observance, and Mr. Ott has himself to blame 
if he has been, although accidentally, treated to the same measures that 
pertain to the only less disagreeable individual who calls Vith a club under 
Ins ooat, and for whose temporary entertainment and diversion the afore- 
mentioned vigorous canine is intended while the fighting editor unlimbers 
his derringer and deploys into line. We are glad, however, to have the 
opportunity to say something agreeable to the feelings of the family as re- 
quested, for we incidentally understand that the generous Mr. Ott has his 
Bfe insured for -510,000. For the benefit of the said family, therefore, we 
hereby agree that at any future personal interview between Air. Ott and 
our pet the latter is to submit to no interference whatever. 

Mr. George T. Bromley has sent us a postal which is chiefly devoted 
to a humorous assertion of the fact that his name is not George C. as we 
printed it last week. This and the suggestion that the McCarthy was 
preparing a reconnoissance in force in our direction with a club under his 
coat made conjunctively a Bromleyian scintillation of no mean merit. Un- 
happily, however, we search in vain for evidences of contrition and a de- 
sire to reform in the frivolous communication alluded to. Evidently the 
inveterate George has determined to continue to throw dust in the eyes of 
the community. Last week we attuned our siren song in the hope to, in that 
way, allure this modern Jason from his pursuit of the golden fleece in the 
city's Treasury, butallin vain. Neither the Scylla of logic nor theCharybdis 
of poesy seems to beguile to slumber the rumblings of George's midnight 
machine. In fact, we rather suspect a latent design on the part of this 
shiniug light of the Bohemians to hitch an additional span to his junk shop 
on wheels and consign our doomed city to premature interment at one fell 
sweep. We withhold our restive pen yet a little while, however, in the 
saving hope that this genial genius of the jovial "Jinks " will put the brakes 
on his machine and his conscience at the same time and hereafter make 
night hideous in some less comprehensive way. It grieves us to write it, 
George— it is with painful reluctance we even vaguely intimate such a 
thing, but the hardhearted proprietor of this select family journal has 
passed the word to write a hole through your ineffectual machine, and this 
is a faternal note of warning for you to get off the box. 

"Ob, why should the angels fold their wings? And why should 
the summer flee ? And why should I list while the song bird sings 
To the hum of the bumble bee ?" The above is the first 
verse of a poem that is sent us by a young lady at the Palace 
Hotel, with the pathetic request that we publish it "somewhere" 
in our charming paper, even if she has to pay for its insertion. 
As the lyric in question has been rudely and .ungallantly crowded out of 
the other departments of this select periodical by the envious and ungen- 
tlemanly compilers thereof, the native chivalry of the Town Crier impels 
him to publish it, though in what might be called a segregated form. It 
gives him pleasure to state to the fair poetess, therefore, that the remain- 
ing twenty-eight verses will appear in this column, as above, at the rate of 
a verse a week. This ingenious idea will extend this beautiful production 
into the Centennial, and possess other advantages. The above install- 
ment may be considered as four bits' worth, and a prompt weekly remit- 
tance of that sum to the Town Crier at this office will materially alleviate 
the rigors of a hard winter. 



'Doctroaa SJguorn Ftrlemon honor to ol 

the bill to remove the Ii. ease uu ironi I 
. and rather Intimate* that, In i 
thereof the planeti In their courses, have taken Into violrn 
tion the entire future reconstruction of the now 
Life pursued by the Town Ori&r. Rathsr than |»ern it any) 



with our present anuudng itraek of luok In having mcfa oVi, 
to write annul and the Slgnora, we willingly make the 

bold off what, n 



ous orthography of the astrological profession, the Signora onus our 
"recUs' pen although we oannol inilfUvintimati 

surprise thai the divining rods of these Inscrutable brancfi 
and futurity did no t bournes foretell the failure of the aforesaid icheme. 

However, we tamper no longer with tl nohanting oareer ori 

id out for the writer. Only, in consideration of this distin 
I ration on our part, we shall Implicitly expect the unmediat 
ol thai inevitable rich ancle in India the letter containing good w 
Immediate devotion of the Li wly; an instant and astounding rise 

of all the stocks in our little tin box. and* in fact, all and several of the 
conveniences ami advantages resultant upon the gratitude of this daugh- 
ter of mystery, without money and without price. 

It Is with pain that wo learn from one of the members of the Bonanza 
arm that the Government has replied to their offer to exhibit eighteen 
car loads of silver bullion at the Centennial, that it doubts its authority 

ime responsible for the ten millions and odd dollars repn 
while on exhibition. We think we discern in thin reluctance an 
suspicion that rXeynexnan or the Hoard of Brokers mean to attend the Ex- 
on. Rather, however, than the National Jubilee should need ■ 
singls attraction, the Town Orier hastens to inform Messrs. Flood and 

an that he has a maiden aunt residing in Philadelphia who 
large, dry cellar, and which she has no real use for this Summer. There El 
no reason why the bullion should not be at once sent to her care, and 
away until the authorities can make up their minds about the matter. 
It would not be the least inconvenience, we assure the above firm, as the 
coal and wood can just as well be kept in the back yard, and the refriger- 
ator in the spare room up stairs. The Town Crier begs them not to be 
diffident about this open-handed offer, and in order to prevent the freight 
from being delivered at the wrong house he will agree to personally super- 
intend its transportation and storage. The Centennial shall not be a fail- 
ure if the Town Crier can help it. 

The green seal of the Cliff House eating rooms seems destined to 
be the only attraction of the name in the vicinity of that breezy 
lishment, if the new attempt to deprive our waters of the natural history 
adjuncts to their scenery is successful. Some astute individuals have dis- 
covered the remarkable fact that to the ravages of the seals the scarcity 
of certain kinds of fish is due, and these disinterested parties scout at the 
idea that this deficiency is the result of the tireless filtration of our sur- 
rounding waters through the nets of the swarming Chinese fishermen. 
" It is a long time since antiquity," as the country lecturer remarked, 
but what we know of that interesting period convinces us that the sea 
lions swarmed and gamboled about our rocks, and fish were as plenty 
around them in the dim grayness of forgotten time as they have ever been 
since. John, the Celestial, has produced the change, and though he is a 
put upon and much-abused creature— to our shame be it said — yet his net 
profits that will deprive us of the fitful gannet and the bellowing seal are 
too great for endurance. Let the frugal Mongolian wind up and unbait. 

We perceive that a Mr. Paulson is in receipt of a mysterious look- 
ing coffin shaped box, or rather would be if he were not out of town. We 
are further informed by the dailies, that having invested this object with 
all sort of terrible attributes and properties, the frequenters of that gen- 
tleman's office gaze at the slumbering infernal machine with hat-peg eyes 
and await the return and destruction of Mr. P with morbid impa- 
tience. This recalls a similar apprehension on the part of a worthy Oak- 
lander directly after the Bremerhaven plot. His family and neighbors 
enjoyed the agonized contemplation of a similar package for about three 
weeks, when, curiosity becoming unendurable, the portentous engine of 
destruction in the front yard was dexterously undermined, a can of 
powder inserted and a fuse started. For the next half hour the sky 
rained rotten apples and decayed pears. The box was a present of fruit 
from the Oaklander's, grandmother in Petaluma. It wasn t a good season 
for fruit either. 

A. cruel disappointment was that of a party of ladies and gentle- 
men exploring the depths of the Bonanza mines the other day. It was 
arranged that a lunch was to be eaten on the 1500-foot level, and there- 
fore at noon four large baskets full of dainties, both liquid and substan- 
tial, were lowered into the depths. These descended first among a group 
of honest Cornish miners, delving on the 1200-foot level, who, in the ab- 
sence of any instructions decided, after much discussion, that it must be 
an American national holiday, or something of the kind, above ground, 
and that this was a kindly little compliment from the Bonanza Princes. 
They therefore fell to on the eatables with much vim. When the ex- 
hausted excursionists inquired for their refreshments, they discovered 
only the empty hampers and about twenty brawny miners full of chicken 
salad, Roederer, mashed ice and things, dancing a demoniac Cornish 
breakdown by the fitful light of the flaring torch. Tableaux ! 

Mr. D. Passmore, a manufacturer and vendor of the staff of life, 
manifested much indignation in court the other day on account of his 
name "getting into the papers." This reluctance of the haughty com- 
pounder of the matutinal roll to have greatness thrust upon him is entirely 
praiseworthy and commendable. There are so many devoted asses aspir- 
ing to the distinction of seeing their commonplace names inprint that 
this move in the reverse direction of the bacchanalian, but diffident, Mr. 
Passman is as an oasis of modesty in a desert of egotism. Unquestionably 
Dr. D we are sure it must be Daniel — Passmore should have his retir- 
ing inclinations gratified, and we trust no insidious exchange will even 
copy this kindly indorsement of his course. 

"The opera of Trovatore, by Meyerbeer," has been extensively 
advertised by the business agent of Wade's Opera House. With tears in 
our eyes we demand to know what the authentic composer of that im- 
mortal production has done to deserve this cruel insult. It is bad enough 
to be asked to patronize Wachtel on the ground of his having once been a 
hack driver — as though he has not committed enough extortion under 
those circumstances', but to have one of the really great composers thus 
shorn of his familiar laurels is crowding the audience very much indeed. 
Return, O wandering Bert, return ! 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1*76. 



COURT CHAT, 

And the Upper Ten. Thousand at Home 
and Abroad. 

The recent revival of the Dukedom of Gor- 
don increases the number of titles borne by the 
Duke of Richmond to eight, of which four are 
dukedoms, but there are many peers who possess 
more than this. The Duke of Athole has twenty- 
three. He is Duke of Athole (1703) ; Marquis 
of Tullibardine (1703) ; Marquis of Athole (1676) ; 
Earl of Tullibardine (IGOli) ; Earl of Athole 
(1629) ; Earl of Strathtay and Strathardle (1703) ; 
Viscount of Balquhider (1076) ; Viscount Glenal- 
mond and Glenlyon (1703) ; Baron Murray (1604); 
Baron Balvenie and Gask (1070) ; Baron Percy 
(1299) ; Baron Lucy (1414); Baron Latimer (1597); 
Baron Strange (1028); Baron Murray and Earl 
Strau-e (1780) ; and Baron Glenlyon (1821). The 
late Marquis of Hastings had nineteen titles, the 
present Duke of Hamilton has seventeen, the 
Duke of Argyll sixteen, Duke of Buccleuch six- 
teen, Marquis of Bute fifteen, Duke of Abercorn 
thirteen, the Marquises of Huntly, Lansdowne, 
and Lothian, eleven each, the Duke of Montrose 
and the Earl of Wemyss ten each, and the Dukes 
of Beaufort and Buckingham nine each. 

In the middle of the winter of 183S a fire 
broke out in the female seminary at Limoges, 
France, and spread with such rapidity that it 
was feared all the inmates would perish. Sud- 
denly there was a cry that one little girl had been 
left iu her room. As the excited spectators were 
beginning to pray for the unfortunate child, a 
tall girl, with disheveled blonde hair and flowing 
nightgown, ran through the crowd, and, with a 
shriek of "I'll save her!*' that rose above the 
sound of cracking timbers and fallen masonry, 
dashed into the doorway. Aloud hurrah, that 
was prolonged to the echo only to be repeated 
again, attracted the attention of the devotees, 
and the pale faced girl was seen hurrying through 
the flames with the terrified child. A few days 
thez'eafter King L^uis Philippe sent the heroine 
a gold medal for her bravery, and a captain of 
the French army, who had witnessed the girl's 
pluck, begged an introduction. The captain is 
now President of Prance and the brave girl 
Madame MacMahon. 

Rinkomania is, undoubtedly, themostfashion- 
able madness that has ever attacked London, and 
it threatens to extend its debrious ecstasies to 
all the large cities of Europe. In London people 
are content to break their necks, or glide like 
swans, sub cwln, or by the light of some glaring 
gas jets, but for the Parisians a more subtle and 
delicate charm is requisite than that produced by 
the mere exhilaration of skating over a smooth 
surface. A night fete at the Cirque Franconi is 
the link between the sublime and the ridiculous. 
Lime-light takes the place of moonlight, and 
shred of paper and wool are substituted for flakes 
of snow ; while, to further the delusion, the 
dancers and rinkists are attired in warm furs, 
which, as the exercise is none of the coolest, and 
the building one of the hottest, must be endured 
rather than enjoyed. 

One of the speakers at a gathering of literary 
men that took place during the past week de- 
clared that while on the staff of the Morning 
Chronicle he had rejected and basketed some of 
Mr. Diraeli's copy and contribution of leaders to 
his paper, and as a souvenir of such incidents he 
has kept the manuscript of one of those contribu- 
tions in his possession. But Mr. Disraeli is not 
the only distinguished contributor of leading 
articles. There is good authority for saying that 
on one occasion the Times published a leader from 
the pen of no less a person than the Queen. It 
was not a very long one, but those who are ac- 
quainted with the circumstances declare that it 
was an excellent contribution. Palxnerston was 
a frequent contributor to the Morning Chronich : 
and Wellington, Gladstone, and Granville in- 
spired, and in some instances Ifave dictated, 
leaders for the London press. — English Paper. 

His Royal Highness the Duke of Cam- 
bridge, Sir Henry Wilmott, M. P., Lord Mid- 
dleton, and many local members of Parliament 
and magistrates are amongst the numerous sub- 
scribers to a fund which lias been raised in order 
to erect a suitable monument in the village of 
Cossall in recognition of the services rendered to 
the country by the three Waterloo veterans, 
known here as the three Cossall giants — Shaw, 
the famous Life Guardsman, said to have killed 
ten men with his sword when rushing for the 
colors ; Wappington, who seized them ; and 
Wheatley, of the Light Dragoons, who came out 
of the battle unhurt, and who was a well-known 
trooper in the Veumanry. 

The Khedive has sent agents to Berlin to en- 
g. ge German officers for the Egyptian army. 



SOMETHING FOR ALL OF US. 
Having spent somet dug like half a million 
of money in building the turret ship 2Wtoderer t we 

are about to try to blow her up. The experiment 
to be tried at Portsmouth shortly has certainly 
not that exact object iu view, but if it has that 
result no one will be surprised, except perhaps 
J the Board of Admiralty. It is intended to ascer- 
tain how an ironclad can be protected against the 
Whitehead torpedo. This is the most terrible in- 
strument of destruction known in modern war- 
fare. It can be propelled forward at a regulated 
depth under water by one or more screws worked 
by pneumatic pressure, and it gives no warning' of 
its insidious approach beyond a few air bubbles on 
the surface. Should either its nozzle or its whisk- 
ers hit the mark, nothing in the world can save 
the ship. The only way in which a v.ssel can be 
secured against these deadly projectiles is to pro- 
tect it by a rigid crinoline, which, by arresting 
the progress of the torpedo, will cause it to ex- 
plode harmlessly in the water. The great ques- 
tion to settle is to determine by practical means 
the limitation of its effects. For this purpose the 
starboard side of the Thwndereria to be protected 
with a net of iron wire, supported by booms, at 
a distance of 22 feet from the ship, and kept rigid 
to below the depth of the keel by heavy weights. 
Of course the torpedo, on second consideration, 
will not be charged. — Court Journa 



C. P. R. R. 



Commencing Tuesday, Feb. 1st, 1876, and until 
further notice, Trains and Boats will 
Leave San Francisco : 
(Change of River-Steamer Landing to Market St. Wharf. 



7AA A.M. (Sundays excepted), Vallejo Steamer (from 
*yj*J Market St. Wharf)— Connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento, 
"making close connection at Napa with stages for So- 
nouia." (Arrive 6\ob p.m.) 



8(](j A.M. (daily), Atlantic Express Train (via Oak- 
• "V7 land Ferry) for Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding and Portland (O.), Colfax, Reno, Ogden and Oma- 
ha. Connects at Nileswith train arriving at San Jose 
12:85 P.M. (Arrive 5:85 P.M.) 



8AA A.M. (Sundays only), Vallejo Steamer (frt 
*\J\J Market St. Wharf), connecting at Vallejo wi 



,:rom 
arf), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga and Sacramento, and at Napa with 
stages for " Sonoma." (Arrive 8:55 P.M. ) 



3f\f\ P.M. (daily) C. P. R. R, San Jose Passenger 
•"" Train (via Oakland Ferry), st«i 



pning at all way 
(Arrive it::>5 A.M.) 



4nA P.M. (daily) Passenger Train (via Oakland 
•^" Ferry), to Stockton only, connecting at Lathrop 
with Express Train for Merced, viaalia, Sumner, Calicnte 
and Los Angeles; also at Niles with train arriving at 
San Jose 0:55 P.M. (Arrive 12:40 p.m.) 



4- 00 * > "'^" ( Su,ia X vs excepted), Vallejo Steamer (from 
^•W Market St. Wharf), connecting at Vallejo with 
trains for Calistoga, Knight's Landing and Sacramento. 
(Arrive li:io a.m.) 



4f\f\ P.M. (Sundays excepted) H:i' 
.\J\J (from Market St. SVnarf), toi 



Sacramento Steamer 
UChing at Benieia 
and Landings on the Sacramento Iii\er. Taking the 
overland third class passengers to connect with train 
leaving Sacramento at 9:00 a.m., daily. 
(Arrive 8:00 p.m.) 



OAKLAND AND ALAMEDA FERRY. 

From Sam Francisco to Oakland. — " Daily" — 7:00, 
7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 0:00, 0:30, 10:00, 11:00 a.m. ; 12:00, 1:00, 
2:00, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:30. 0:00. 6:30, 7:00,8:10. 
0:20 and 10:30 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays "—0:10 A. M. 
and 11:46 P.M. "Sundays only "—10:30 and 11:30 A.M. ; 
12:30 and 1:30 r.M. 

From Sax Francisco to Alameda. — "Daily " — 7:00, 
8:00, 9:00 and 10:00 AM. ; 12:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 6:00 and 
10:30 P.M. " Sundays only "—11:00 a.m., and 1:30 P.M. 

From San Francisco to Ferns (dk. — " Daily, except 
Sundays "—7:00, 9:00 and 10:00 a.m. ; 5:00 and 10:30 r.M. 

From San Francisco to Brooklyn.—" Daily " — 7:30 
8:30 and 9:30 A.M. ; 1:00,3:30,4:30,5:30, 6:30, 7:00, 8:10 
and 9:20 P.M. " Daily, except Sundays "— 0:10, 11:00 a.m., 
and 11:45 P.M. "Sundays only"— 10:80, 11:30 a.m., and 
12:30 r.M. 

From Brooklyn to San FRANcrsco.—" Daily "—6-40 
7:40, 8:40, 9:40 and 10:40 a.m. ; 12:40,2:40,4:40,5:40, 0:40, 
7:50, 9:00 and 10:10 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays'- ":]0 
and 5:50 a.m. "Sundays only "—11:40 a.m., and 1:25 p.m. 

From Alameda to San Francisco.— "Daily "—7:00, 
S:03 and 9:00 AM.; 3:00, 3:58, 5:00, O:0S and 7:00 r.M. 
" Daily, except Sundays"— 5:00, 5:40, 11:30 am., and 1:80 
r.M. " Sundays only "--10:00, 11:00 am. ; 12:00 aud 1:00 

P.M. 

From Fhrxside to Sax Francisco.— "Daily, except 
Sundays"— 6:55, 8:00 and 11:05 a:.m. ; 3:55 and 0:05 p.m. 

From Oakland to San Francisco.—" Daily "- 0-50 
7:2n. 7:50, 8:25, 8:50, 9:20, 9:50, 10:50and 1150 A.M. : 12:50 
2:50, 3:20, 3:50, 4:20, 4:50, 5:20, 5:50. i} : 30. 0:50, 7:20, 8:00. 
9:10 and 10:20 p.m. " Daily, except Sundays " 5:20, 6:00 
a. U., and 1:50 p.m. "Sundays only"— 10:20 and 11-20 
a.m. ; 12:20, 1:20 and 1:85 P.M. 

OVERLAND TICKET OFFICE, at New Ferry Land- 
ing, Coot of Market Btrcet, 

T. H. GOODMAN, r.eu. Pass and Ticket Agt. 
A. N, Towns, General Superintendent. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC KAILR0AD. 

NORTHERN DIVISION. 
WINTER AKRAXGEMENT. 

Commencing Snmlay. December 26th, 
"', Passenger Trains will leave San Franci 
from Passenger Depot on Townsend street, between 

■ ■ 

7 00 AM - vdaily). for Bernal, San Miguel, Colraa, 
, _*^- /T -' Baden aud San Bruno. 

Q On A.M. (daily), tor San Jose, Gil 

{J.*J\J Tres I'inos. Pajaro, Salinas, Soledad and all 

Way Stations. Stage coin i- with this train. 



3 9^ PM. daily (Sundays excepted), for San Jose, 
• AtJ Giu-oy and Way Stations. 



J. 4-0 PM ' (daily *' for San Jose aiui Way stat ' ous - 



(\ 1 O P-M ' v&iily), for San Mateo and Way Stations. 



S^r Extra Train on Sundays Discontinued. 

A. C. BASSETT, Superintendent, San Francisco. 



I,OS AXOEEES DIVISION. 

Until connection is made between the Northern Divi- 
sion and Los Angeles Division, passengers for points 00 
the Los Angeles Division of the mad will take the ears 
of the Central Pacific Railroad, via Oakland, at 4 p.m. 
daily for Tulare, Tipton, Delano, Poso, Lerdo, Sumner 
and Caliente ; thence by Telegraph Stage Line via Teha- 
chapi Pass to San Fernando (98 miles only), and by 
Southern Pacific Railroad for Los Angeles, Compton and 
Wilmington; for Florence, Downey, Norwalk, Costs and 
Anaheim— 100 miles from San Diego; and for San Ga- 
briel, Monte, Puente, Spadra, Cucamonga, Colton, 
Mound City, San Gorgonia Summit and White Water, 
making connection at White- Water with the -i 
the Arizona and New .Mexico Express Oo, for Khrenbuig, 
Wickeoberg, Prescott, Phosnix, Florence and Tucson, 
E. K. HEWITT, Superintendent, Los Angeles. 

J. L. WILLCUTT, Gen'J Passenger and Ticket Agent, 
San Francisco. Dec. 25. 



S. F. & N. P. R. R. AND STEAMERS. 

(Change of Time.— On anil after Mon- 
j day, November' 15th, the steamer JAMES M. Dl >X- 
AHUE,' Captain W. Warner, will leave Green-street 
wharf, daily (Sundays excepted), at 2:30 o'clock p.m. ; 
connecting at Donahue Landing with cars for Petaluma, 
Santa Rosa, Fulton, Healdsburg, Litton's, Cloverdaleand 
intermediate places. The train will leave CI o\ rd 
daily (Sundays excepted), connecting with steamer at 
Donahue for San Francisco. No more Sunday trips un- 
til further notice. Close connections made with stages 
on the arrival and departure of trains for Sonoma City, 
the Geysers. Skaggs, Mark West and Highland springs. 
Also, Point Arena", Sebastopol, Bodega, Duncan's Mule, 
Fisk's Mills, Oualala, Clear Lake, Lakeport, Dkiah, Eure- 
ka, Mendocino, Pine Flat, Petrified Forest and Quicksilver 
mines. Freight received from 7 a.m. till 4 p.m. For all 
information, apply at General Office, 426 Montgomery st. 
P. DONAHUE, President. 

F. H. GF.ItDES, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 

General Office : 426 Montgomery et., S. F. Sept. is. 



JOYCE'S SPORTING AMMUNITION- 

[ESTABLISHED 1820.] 

The attention of Sportsmen is invited 
to the following Ammunition, of the best quality, 
now in general use throughout England, India and the 
Colonies : Joyce's Treble WaterproofCentral Fire Percus- 
sion Caps; Chemically-prepared Cloth and Felt Gun Wad- 
ding ; Joyce's Gas-Tight Cartridges, for Pin-fire and Cen- 
tral-fire Breech-loading Guns ; Wire Cartridges, for kill- 
ing game at long distances, and every description ol 
Sporting Ammunition. Sold by all gunmakers and deal- 
era ingunpowder. FREDERICK JOYCE & CO., 

Patentees and Manufacturers, 
Aug. 20. 57 Upper Thames street, London. 



OREGON STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

Regular Steamers to Portland, leaving 
San Francisco weekly- Steamers, I. L. STEPHENS, 
ORIFLAMMB, and AJAX, connecting with steamers to 
SITKA and PUGET SOUND, and O.andC. B R. Co. and 
Oregon C. It. R. Co. through Willamette, Umpo.ua, and 
Rogue River Valleys, Oregon. Tickets to all points 013 
the 0. and C. R. R. sold at reduced rates. Sailing Days : 
Saturdays at 10 o'clock a. si. 
June 14. WM. N< mills, Agent, 210 Battery street 



SEDUCTION OF RATES OF FREIGHT TO 
PORTLAND. 

Freigrhton Merchandise to Portland on 
i (regon Steamship Company's steamers REDUCED 
TWO DOLLARS PER TON until 'further notice. 
May 20. WM. NORRIS, Agent. 



TEETH SAVED! 

Filling: Teetli n NiHMTiaUy Great patience 
extended to children. Chloroform administered, 
and teeth skillfully extracted. Alter ten years constant 
practice, I can guarantee Satisfaction, Prices moder- 
ate. Office— 1~0 Sutter street, above Montgomery. 
June 6. DR. MORFFEW, Dentist. 



C. MAIN. E. H. WINCHESTER. 

MAIN & WINCHESTER. 

Maiturwtnrern and Importer* of SI:trre*H. 
Raddles, Bridles, Whips, Collars, Saddlery Ware, 
etc., Nos. aU and 21(1 Battery street. San Francisco. 
N. 6.— A good assortment of Concord Stage Harness 
constantly on hand. Sept. l'J. 



JOSEPH CURLE, 

Accountant, 

5 13 Montgomery ilrort. 
Sau Fruiiciuco. t'al. [Feh. t. 



19, L87&1 



CALIFORNIA ADVEUTISEK. 



ll 



NOTABILIA. 



LiiMiIi all 

uriuvl, "and ■ 

,-t evt-r since 1 can rvmvuiber. 1 never 

" 

A pious tither entered a ealoon with a hone-whip, one night last 

i!-l hi-* H..ti i.];ivin ; cu.-luv, H Untied the young man's 

I then sat down and finished the game himself. 

l>ly atfwU !!■< obvimia reason why every housekeep r 

■ La MonUuy.i\ mammoth houst'-hiirdwaru ami »tove 

■ belp a*lvinin« no M-iisible a course all th< 

■ 

Asenaible wromanrcinarks t"« tin- L,-iHs. " Look out For physical health 
and !• dee of the race. l>-> not bestow a glani 

■ I ; shun him as you would a pestilence." Thank 
iy dear. And, wo may add, don't look at a man a ho won't promise 

t phaeton w itii a 1 wd by those a 

anient, Main & \\ inchester. No. 214 Battery stn 

II you have a favor tn ask of a man, now be bum and shut the door 
uu yo into bis ortict 1 . If you wish to !>«■ perfectly certain that he 

: i. of that inimitable 
■old by ■ ;.■!..• Hamlin, 412 Market Btrcet Hia ( ilarota are the- ohi 
(piality, in th 

At Salt Lake, the other day, a young lady fr-.m the interior entered a 

nd called for a pail The clerk politely asked her 

iiiuiiltvr she wore : " Why, two ; do you suppose I am a centipede 



Jacob Sultsman, of Decatur, Pa., choked to death on a piece of meat 
while intoxicated, the other day. This incident may he- taken (according 
■ as a warning never to lie intoxicated or never t i eat meat. If lie 
had been eating one of Con die's Pan Roasts this won hi never have hap- 
pened. They fairly melt in one's mouth. Corville's Saddle Rook .Saloon 
Bon Pine street, above Montgomery. 

There is every reason to believe that the dynamite fiend was an 
aristocrat, with uo sympathy lor tl It" he'd wanted to elevate 

the working classes he'd have shipped bia explosive on an emigrant ship. 
Tin' lady who wishes to elevate her taste in the jewelry line should call 
and inspeel th tock on hand at J >. W. Laird's San Francisco 

Jewelry Manufactory, corner Merchant and Muntgomery streets. 

Anthony Trollope says that no man is less susceptible to female infin- 
inn the one who indulges in athletic sports. Voung*man, go to the 
lift, buy an Indian club, or join the Olympics. Influence over the 
. however, can best be assured by buying your clothes from the 

superb new stock just received by Van Schaack, opposite the Plaza, on 

Kearny street. 

A man does not know what he may do until he is tried. I came of 
Jtock -my parents were honest. I would not steal I have faults, 
but they lie in a different direction. — Beecher's Sunday Sermon. 

A Stockton minister, who had his hat stolen, gravely observed from 
ilpit last Sunday : " Bash fulness, dearly beloved, doesn't break out 
in this community as much as the small-pox and measles." No one was 
ever known to he bashful when asked to take a quiet nip of the best old 
Bourbon in America. F. & P. J. Cassin, No. 523 Front street, sell it ex- 
clusively. 

The most magnificent coat ever known to have been made is worn 
by the Maharajah of Puttala, and is valued at $675,000. It is fringed 
With pearls and set with precious stones. We have ordered a duplicate. 

e also ordered one of those stylish eye-glasses from Muller's, op- 
posite the Occidental. We are bound to go the whole thing. 

The " leap year necktie " for gentlemen is out. We have not seen it, 

but we suspect it is a young lady's sleeve, with an arm in it. and goes all 

the way round the neck. Every enterprising young man should have one. 

pA's best thing — see it ? — is a quiet Uttle lunch at the " Criterion," 

No. 210 Kearny street. 

A correspondent wants to know the best way to become a literary 
man. Well, the quickest way for him is to make a short voyage to sea. 
He will very likely become a contributor to the Atlantic. 

An exchange talks about the extraordinary patience of a domestic hen 
on a China egg. Probably the editor never saw a lone women, late at 
night, standing behind the front door with a pair of prass tongs. There is 
ing to be done on those occasions but to tell her she may go down to 
Bradley & Rulofson's and have one of those exquisite Convex Photographs 
taken. " 

Look out now and you can see the planet Mercury — if you can find 
it. It is within a few feet of the setting sun, and is about as big as a com- 
mon white bean. The best glass to aid you in the search is one filled with 
some of the superb Champagne just received by A. P. Hotaling, No. 431 
Jackson street. 

Let's forget how Keeley has used us. A man in Bloomington has in- 
vented a contrivance by which he can do his work — that of an accountant 
— while reclining in an easy chair. By the way, the handsomest easy 
chairs and every other superior article of furniture can be found at N. P. 
Cole's, No. 220 Bush street. Look at his new and splendid stock. 



Miaa Julia Thomas, of Cornell fro 



Mnkoanoteof thisfor \oiu- ^uidiif- in future I 

'■ !,,,lt " f ,l "" ' rmiietil 

ucl a European Siberian Una fro 
. Tumen and Axtamovka. 

Coughs.— A Medicinal P In the form of he m wt 

coughing, giving relief in Bronchitis, Hoarseness, [nfl 
taints, 

"When a police captain be high 

ma] error. No one, however, i 
pardoned for the fatal error of di r when Napa 

Soda is BO eh. -a p. 

BROKERS. 



SAMUEL McKEE & CO , 

Stork Brokenand deaden in Stock Privileges, 834 Hods- 
■ 

■ Sell Stocks foi i 

... 
thai we lire compelled to remove (Tom our laU ollic 

•moany/fl Building! Our Broken are bit C 

■ U3. N MEAL, Uenibere ■■< the San Fruncbtca Stock und Kxchaugo Board 

The Nevada Bank ol Our Week!) I 

■■■:■■ 

b Pamphlet expli (drew Mo 

at Virginia City, En Welle, Fargo a Oo."B building Jan. 20. 

D. 0. SC0FIELD & CO.. 

(Commission stock Brokers, bay and sell nil stocks, and 
j carry sam lorgin Our Mr. Scofleld, tale "i" and for many yean tho junior 

member of tho well known mercantile firm ol F. B. TAYLOB 3c CO.. will give hia 

exclusive attention tofillinj,' all orders. itooms o' mid 7, No. :;i .i 

San Francisco. | . . 



I Browse. 



Gks. G. R. VSRXON 



S 



J. J. T.iWN. 

VERNON, TOBIN & CO., 
tock Brokers, Montgomery street, next Deposit Co.'S 

Vaults, San Francisco, Pacific Stock Exctaai Feb. 5. 



W. Stuhlkv. ] 



STAIRLEY & HAVEBSTICK, 
10 1-2 Cal 

ning stocks. 



[W, II I1a\) ESI ni,. 



Stock and Money Brokers, 110 1-2 < a 11 Torn ia street. Orders 
received for purchase and Bale of mi 



Feb. 



REMOVAL ! 

JW. Brown A- Co.. Stock and Money Brokers, knve ro- 
* moved to No, S17 Montgomery Btraet, Nevada Block, 
.1. W. Brown, Mem. S. F. Stock and Exch. Board. [Jan. 8.] Gko. S. Brown 

NOTICE OF REMOVAL. 

Fry, \c;U A- Co., Commission Stock Brokers, have removed 
to No. 830 Montgomery street, Safe Deposit Building. 
(.'has. S. Neal, Member 3. Y. Stock & Exch. Board. [Jan. 20.] E. M. Fay. 



Albert A. Hickox. Tuomas Steel. H. G. Kuiil. 

ECni, STEEL AND niCKOX, 

Stock Brokers, 302 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California. [10-2. 

JAMES H. LATHAM & CO., 

Stock and Money Brokers, 411 California Street, San Frao 
cisco. Member B, P. Stock and Exchange Board. Honey loaned on stocks. 
Stocks bought and csirried on margins. Jan. 8. 

Sherwood Callaghan.] NOTICE OF REMOVAL. [Jekemiau Lynch, 

C^allapfhaii, Eyncli A- Co. have removed to No. 106 Lctriettilorir 
J street, near corner of Halleck. Jon. B. 

JOHN G. AYRES, 

Late or Ayres, Cope A Co., « all negotiate loans, and ina> and 
.-._il stocks "i every description on commiBsion, Oilicc : No. 'Ml Montgomery 
street (Nevada Blook.) " Jan. 8, 

SAMUEL McKEE & CO., 
rokersantl Dealers in Stock Privileges, Puis anil Calls, 

224 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Jan. I. 



B 



QBOROB E. BlAOUlKB. 



Edwin F. Child, S. F. Stock Exchange. 

CHILD & MAGTJIEE, 

(lonimiHsion Stock Brokers, 433 California s tree t.-« Stocks 
j Bought, Sold and Carried or Margins. Liberal Advance on active accounts. 

Sight and Time Limits on National Bank ol BepubliC, New York, in sums to 

Mllit. .hi Mi: ■"'. 

E. P. PECKHAM, 

(Commission Stock Broker and Member S. F. Stock V.x- 
J change, 4 la California street. St'K'ks li.u-iil, sold and carried. Liberal ad- 
vances made on active accounts. Orders receive pruuipt execution and return. 
(June. 19.) 



E. CAH1LL & CO., STOCKBROKERS, 
406 Montgomery Street. 



Dec. 11. 



HUBBARD & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers, 322. and 324 California street, 
Sao FranciacOj Will transact business through the San Francisco Stock and Ex- 
chan g e Board. Julv 17. 

F. G. BERRY, 

Late of Berry A Capp, Coinmission Stock Broker. Office at 
former place of business. -IIS Montg iry street. Sept 18. 

Tod Robinson]. [H. H. Scott, Member S. F. Stock and Exch. Board 

H- H. SCOTT & CO., 

Commission Stock Brokers. 307 Montgomery street (Xcvada 
Block), .San Francisco, ttonej advanced OH Stocks. Feb. 12. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1876. 



TELL uuw SO. 
" O my bonnie, brown bird in my sweet, little nest, 
Why silent and sad, with no laughter and song ? 
Of all the dear birdies, I love thee the best, 

And know that my love is as tender and strong.' 
A ripple, a trill, and a gay little strain, 

With fresh ruffled plumage to make her more fair, 
" If ever you ask me such questions again, . 

Look into your heart, for the answer is there. ' 
" You love me, yet tell me so seldom you do, 

My heart gets to doubting and sadder I grow; 

The joy that it gives me if once you but knew, ^ 

I think you would always keep telling me so." 

— A. E., in Golden Rule, 

THE RIFLE CHAMPIONSHIP OP THE WORLD. 

Besides *ki & ri& e match between Great Britain and America, 

which is arranged to be held on the other side of the Atlantic in the com- 
in<* season, the preliminaries being now arranged, a competition is now 
being organized for the " Championship of the World," in which selected 
teams of eight men from England, Scotland, Ireland, Germany, France, 
Austria, the Dominion of Canada, the South American States, and other 
countries will participate. With this object a letter has been addressed 
by the President and Secretary of the National Rifle Association _ of New 
York to the various rifle associations of this and other countries, in which 
they state that "it is the desire of our association that your country 
should be represented in the matches contemplated in honor of the cen- 
tennial anniversary of American independence. These matches will con- 
stitute one of the features of the centennial exhibitions, and will be con- 
ducted under the auspices of the Centennial Commission. The principal 
match will be for the championship of tihe world, open to teams of eight 
from each country ; distances, 800, 900, and 1,000 yards ; Creedmoor 
rules ; prize, a trophy, presented by the citizens of the United States. A 
programme will be prepared as soon as possible, which will embrace other 
matches for shorter distances, and for military and other arms, and copies 
will be furnished you for distribution among your riflemen. Permit us to 
add that it is the intention of our Association to make the American rifle 
tournament of 1876 one of great interest to all who participate, and we 
take much pride in being the medium of announcing to your countrymen 
the earnest wish of the American people to meet you on that interesting 



HOW THEY DO IT IN DENVER. 

A Denver gentleman thus speaks of his experience : While in St. 
Joseph we were introduced to a reporter of one of the city papers, said to 
be the oldest in the city. He took us cordially by the hand with the re- 
mark, "How do you do, Mr. L., how do you do?" After some little 
conversation we invited him to step in and imbibe. " Certainly, captain; 
certainly. Would as soon drink with you as anybody." So we drank. 
Presently we asked him to drink again. '* Certainly, major. I never re- 
fuse to drink with a gentleman. Here's to you." A short pause, and we 
repeated the invition for a third time. The tears came into the old man's 
eyes as he grasped our hand and said, " Colonel, you do me proud. Am 
glad I met you. Here's my regards." We saw we were growing m his 
estimation, so we presently remarked that he looked dry, and asked him 
what he would take. " Whisky and sugar, general; whisky and sugar. 
It has been my steady diet for 25 years. I never take any other." We 
concluded there was no chance for further promotion, so we bade our old 
friend good bye, and as we left him we noticed that he wore one boot, one 
canvas-backed shoe, no stockings, a pair of linen pants' sustained by one 
suspender, and a shirt as unfamiliar to the water as he was himself. But 
he was happy and appreciated us, as was evident from the following per- 
sonal which appeared in the paper next morning : " Major-General L., of 
Denver, Col. , is getting outside of provisions at the Pacific, until Uncle 
Johnnie begins to fear a famine. The General is a whole-souled, genial 
gentleman, a Christian and a scholar, and we hope he will visit us often." 
— Denver Tribune. 

OUR SCHOOLMARMS. 

They have concluded to ask for a three months 1 vacation in order to 
attend the Centennial. It couldn't possibly get on without 'em. By all 
means let 'em have it. Double their pay and fork it over in advance. 
Present them with deadhead passages to and from, and allow them a cool 
thousand apiece for stationery and chewing gum. Put the Palace Hotel 
on wheels and move it over there for their free accommodation. Charter 
two or three livery stables and furnish each "marm"with an Abigail. 
Hire a tragedy troupe, an opera bouffe, a circus, and a tip-top parson and 
church for their amusement. Present every one who marries there with a 
thousand shares of California. Give 'em all a carte blanche on the White 
House for an outfit. Turn out the military to see 'em off. Send a special 
correspondent to " Chronicle " each one's doings. Anything else, ladies? 
Just ask for it. Meantime, remit all penalties, and let the festive hoodlum 
enjoy a centennial " bust." No use of being mean about it. You can't 
do too much for the old girls. Who wouldn't be a schoolmarm ? 
— • ■ 

A few days ago a man in Heckmondwike, England, who had con- 
ducted business operations on a not very extensive scale, unfortunately 
failed, and on presenting his accounts to a meeting of his creditors, showed 
very plainly that there would be no dividend, as there were no assets, 
whereupon one of tb# company, knowing that the bankrupt was a pretty 
good singer, asked him if he would not soothe the wounded feelings of him- 
self and fellow creditors, and cheer their drooping hearts by warbling 
some melodious ditty. The bankrupt expressed his willingness to oblige, 
and forthwith commenced, in tremulous accents, to sing the plaintive 
song, "And you'll remember me." It is the first time we ever heard of a 
creditors' meeting concluding with singing, but the words the debtor 
sung, it must be confessed, were very appropriate. 

The Catacombs of Rome. — These Sunday evening lectures of Rev. 
Dr. Scott, in St. John's Presbyterian Church, are exceedingly interesting 
and instructive, and we are glad to see that the people appreciate them. 
Services at 11 .o'clock a.m. and 7£ p.m. Public very cordially invited. 

Por " Lies of the Day," see Postscript. 



CRADLE, ALTAR, AND TOMB. 



| CRADLE. 

Schoenberg— In thja city, Feb. 13th, to the wife of G. J. Schoenberg, a daughter. 
Aceret— Iu this city,- February 14th, to the wile of Jacob Acerct, a son. 
Schottler— In this city, February 14th, to the wife of A. Schottler, a daughter. 
Knignt— In this city, February 14th, to the wife of John Knight, a daughter. 
Streib— In this city, February 15th, to the wife of Wm. Streib, a son. 
Schwartz— In this city, February 15th, to the wife of Henry Schwartz, a eon. 
Kemmel- In this city, February 15th, to the wife of J. Remme! r a eon, 
Sweetser— In this city, February 16th, to the wife of Capt. F.D. Sweetser, a son. 
Goodman— In this city, February 16th, to the wife of A. Goodman, a daughter. 
Spiegel— In this city, February lfith, to the wife of C. Spiegel, a son. 
Schmidt— In this city, February 13th, to the wife of Henry Schmidt, a son. 

ALTAR. 
Friedlander-Wolff— In this city, Feb. 13th, Samuel Friedlander to Mary Wolff.. 
Nyman-Hill— In this city, February 14th, Wm. Nyman to Lelia J. Hill. 
Schulz-Lion— In this city, February 14th, Ferdinand Schulz to Sarah Lion. 
Ryder-Godfrey— In this city, February 14th, C. H. Ryder to Lenore Godfrey. 
Bruning^-Haulin— In this city, February 14th, J. H. Brnning to Julia Haulin. 
Grindley-Smith— In this city, Feb. 16th, J. H. Grindley to Lizzie E. Smith. 
Lohse- Taylor— In Oakland, February 16<h, Paul Lohse to Mary J. Taylor. 
Robinson-Zimmitt— In thle city, Feb. 16th, R. G. Robinson to M. A. Zimmitt. 
Ahern-Buckley — In this city, February 8th, P. Ahern to Mary J. Buckley. 

TOMB. 
Murry— In this city, February 13th, Francis X. Murry, aged 40 years. 
Taylor — Iu this cily, February 14th, Wm. Harvey Taylor, aged 34 years. 
Higel— In this city, February 14th, Cristopel Higel, aged 78 years. 
Walsh.— In this city. February 14th, Richard Walsh, aged 26 years. 
Garvey— In this city, February 14th, Mary (Jnrvey, aged 31 years. 
Bailey— In this city, February 14th, Catherine E. Bailey, aged 31 years. 
McDonald— In this city, February 14th, Ellen McDonald, aged 47 years. 
Kelly— In this city, February 15th, Mary Ann Kelly, aged 27 years. 
Reid— In this city, February 15th, John Reid, aged 60 ears. 
Kennedy— In this city, February 15th, J. D. Kennedy, aged 47 years. 

POISONED SLEEP. 
Sleep is a boon commonly regarded as priceless ; "but, observes the 
Lancet, it may be purchased too dearly. Macbeth murdered sleep ; a very 
large and, unhappily, increasing number of well-meaning but misguided 
persons poison it. The medical profession has a keen interest in the grow- 
ing practice of habitual recourse to sleep potions, because it is with the con- 
nivance of the profession, if not under its specific advice, that these 
soporific poisons are employed. We think the time has come when some 
strong means should be taken to clear medicine from the reproach of 
countenancing the lay use of opium, chloroform, chloral, chlorodyne, and 
the rest of the sleep producers. The public should be told that they 
are playing with poisons. If they escaped a so-called "accident" which 
ends in sudden death, they are scarcely to be congratulated, since if the 
body does not die, the brain is disordered or disorganized, the mind en- 
feebled, the moral character depraved, or evils hardly less deplorable than 
death are entailed. The consideration may be agonizing, but it is urgent. 
The sleep produced by these narcotics or so-called sedatives — let them act 
as they may " on the nervous system directly " or " through the blood" — 
is poisoned. Their use gives the persons employing them an attack of 
cerebral congestion, only differing in amount, not in kind, from the condi- 
tion which naturally issues in death. There is grave reason to fear that 
the real nature of the operation by which these deleterious drugs, one and 
all, bring about the unconsciousness that burlesques natural sleep, is lost 
sight of, wholly misunderstood, by those who have free recourse to poisons 
on the most .frivolous pretenses, or with none save the exigency of amorbid 
habit. Great responsibility rests on medical practitioners, and nothing can 
atone for the neglect of obvious duty. The voice of warning must be 
raised instantly and urgently if a crying abuse is to be arrested, and final 
loss of confidence in drugs avoided. 

The catalogue of casualties related to us even at a single rink 
(says the Medical Examiner, of London) took us by surprise. We were 
prepared to hear of severe shakes and bruises, slight concussions, head- 
aches, and now and then a fracture of the fore arm, but we did not expect 
accidents leading to sacrifice of life or permanent crippling. Yet we have 
been informed that young ladies have been disfigured for life, and from a 
state of joyous health have been reduced to one of lamentable infirmity. 
A lady is skating with her hands in a muff ; she falls forward in a mo- 
ment on her face, breaking the bones of the nose and face, and her fea- 
tures will be marred without recovery. Another, engaged to be married, 
injures her spine, becomes paralyzed, and is condemned to an invalid's 
couch, no prospect of amendment being entertained by her medical ad- 
viser. Not only are front teeth lost, but jaws are fractured. Not only 
are simple fractures of the fore arm experienced, but arms are broken in 
more than one place, and a compound fracture in the femur has ended in 
death. A fall on the back of the head has led to alienation of the intel- 
lect. With these results, related to us on credible authority, we deem it 
to be our duty to call attention to them. We have been told that at one 
watering place one bad accident at a rink is expected every day. If this 
is true, the number of accidents throughout the kingdom must be consid- 
erable, and we cannot help thinking that it should be the duty of the pro- 
prietors of rinks to furnish to local authorities a weekly return of the acci- 
dents which occur. 

Goethe and the Suez Canal.— Mr. Editor: Under the above cap- 
tion you reprint in your last issue an interesting letter from Mr. Prank 
T. Laurence to the Times, dated Dulwich College, 5th January, referring 
to Goethe's wish : to see three great canals completed, namely, the Darien 
Canal, the Rhine and Danube and the Suez Canal. Mr. Laurence says, 
further on : " It is not a little strange that one of his hopes has been 
realized within the period limited by him." Does the learned gentleman 
(for I suppose he is) refer to the completion of the Suez Canal ? and if so, 
is the Suez Canal in possession of the English, or does he refer to the 
*' Ludwig's Canal," without mentioning it, connecting the Danube with 
the Rhine, built by King Ludwig I. of Bavaria, and open for navigation 
since 1844 ? In the first case I should infer that Mr. Laurence was not 
aware of the existence of " Ludwig's Canal." If the second case must be 
negatived, then Goethe's wish was not fulfilled at Suez ; and, finally, in 
the third case, the caption of the article would be without a meaning, 
although it represents the only one of Goethe's three wishes, actually and 
completely fulfilled. An Admirer 

Of t he Neics Letter and of Goethe and his three wishes. 

For " Lies of the Day," see Postscript. 



Feb, 19, 1876.1 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



AT LAST. 
Man nftar morn but hopes, Uln h1iI|«, 
forth with . i -hi, 

Hut darkness gulden tli- in book Resin, 

With DRM lOOQl i*t tlii- hi dm. 

Each mora I suontfae my Iota ■ arnwn 

of Bowers, t.» mark dot true and Rood] 
\Sy night the roM leaves bom hot hair 

PmU ;»t in> feet tike dropa ol blood 
And yit 1 do not hnur that hope 

will die completely Erom my bonrt] 
Tboogta sorrow oudma my lite, some day 

Snail ton redeem thv greater port. 

ART JOTTINGS 
Since the closing of the exhibition of tin- Art Association quite I lull 
I'til'lf in art circles. The fine picture by de Sua, lately on ex- 
hibition at Morris, Schwab A Co's, has passed into private hands, and in 
we 6nd tin- large picture by -Mr. Bradford, "The Polaris in 
Thank God Harbor. M Tnis work has bean spoken of before in the Jot- 
md we know >-f nothing to add to >>r take from what was then said. 
in .Mr. Bradford's pictures the efforts of a painstaking 
artist. We consider him :\ good artist, bnt not a tn^eot master, and faia 
ire sit of the same character. We believe the picture is painted, 
not from Mr. Bradford's own sketch, but from one taken by the engineer 
ol the Polaris. This, however, has nothing to «1>> with the quality of the 
picture, except that it i» :i difficult t:usk for an artist to place on canvas 
that which i* Been by eyes other than his own. This, the most important 
work of Mr. Bradford's, is now on exhibition in a public place, as it 
should be, where all may go and see it without let or hindrance, and 
lodge of its quality and importance, Ha-1 Mr. Bradford put Ids work be- 
fore the public, us he has now done, upon Ids arrival here, he would have 
avoided the distrust which attaches, and justly so, to chamber exhibitions. 

He would also have avoided the very monotonous appearance of his 
works as they have appeared to visitors nt his rooms, by reason of the 
number Bhown together in such close proximity, all, or nearly all, of 
which are painted in the same tone. There is no artist, living or dead, 
whose works are of sufficient versatility of character to be exhibited 
. without each injuring the other in some degree. 

The first auction sale "f the year came off at New-ball's, on Wednesday, 
and was as well attended as the quality of the work would justify, nor did 
the prices realized mar the harmony of the whole. The buyers at such 
Bales are those who scarcely know a painting from a chromo, except that 
it has a different name and is supposed to be the thing to buy. As a mat- 
ter of fact, the greater number of pictures — so called original paintings — 
which seek buyers in the auction-room, are far behind the better class of 
108 in every quality which go to make a picture, but at each succeed- 
in- sale a close observer will miss more and more the old habitues of the 
picture auction, whose places are filled by those who have a less liberal 
biea of what a picture Bhould bring, having regard first for the style of the 
frame and next the size of the picture, compared to the last chromo 
brought to their door by the itinerant vendor of the once popular art. 

We take it for granted that all art sharps are more or leas familiar with 
the elegant salon occupied by S. M. Brookes, artist, on Clay street. One of 
bis brethren of the man! stick, Mr. Deakin, is at work upon a picture rep- 
resenting the eminent creator of all manner of still life, from a string of 
smelts to'a bonanza bowlder, sitting' in his apartments, surrounded by all 
the elegance usually attaching to an artists studio, only a little more so, 
As to the pose of the subject nothing has yet been determined upon. It 
has, however, been suggested to Mr. Deakin by an eminent landscapist, 
who is ever ready with good advice for his brother artists, that something 
of a semi-tragic character would lend interest to the picture, and at the 
same time create sympathy for artists in general and their families, a con- 
sideration of great importance to all concerned, and the stepping stone to 
financial success. It will sella picture more readily than anything else, and 
will keep off too profuse ornamentation from an artists house in the shape 
of mortgages. The designsuggestedisto represent Mr. Brookes as about 
fainting, overcome by the completion of a large — very large — fish jjicture, 
a whale in fact, and being caught in the arms of (Brookes Jils) a huge 
mess of fish and a demijohn of Cutter Whisky, which has been used a 
mouth or so as models for the picture, are to be close by, leaving it an 
open question whether the smell of the fish, the tasting at the demijohn, 
or the ecstatic joy, mingled with mental and physical prostration, incident 
to the successful completion of such a great work (6x10 feet), had been the 
cause of his undoing. Such a work will be sought after at $10,000, and 
should be completed at once and sent to the Centennial. 

We hear complaints loud and deep that there is not only no demand for, 
but that first-class foreign pictures are next to impossible of sale. No 
good reason can be divined for this. Last year Mr. Schaus brought pic- 
tures out and did well with them. This year he came again, did not pay 
his expenses, and has departed, taking his pictures with him. Mr. 
Thomas Hill, the artist of Joseph Roos & Co., last Summer visited the 
East and brought out some beautiful work of his own selection, but it 
failed to sell, and was returned in due course. Mr. Snow, too, visited 
Europe the past Summer, for the express purpose of purchasing paintings, 
and they are not moving off at satisfactory figures. This is more unfortu- 
nate than bringing them from the East, as then they can be returned 
there, whereas pictures brought here from Europe have no outlet except 
China and Japan, which is, of course, equal to none at alh 

Sending Coal to Newcastle. — It will surprise many of our readers 
to learn that California sends wine to G-ermany ; yet such is actually the 
case, for on calling one day this week upon our old friends, Kohler & 
Frohling, to order some of their old port for our family, we were aston- 
ished to find them busy packing wine that had been ordered by parties 
residing in different parts of the Fatherland, and were not les3 amazed to 
discover that a dozen bottles of their best assorted wines are sent, freight 
paid, to Hamburg for S7. This may, indeed, be called sending coals to 
Newcastle. ^^^ 

Mrs. Dore'a funeral, on Sunday last, was largely attended by her 
many friends, to whom she was endeared by her noble qualities and 
genuine character. The Rev. Mr. Pratt preached a most touching, ad- 
mirable sermon, while the music and singing was beautiful in the ex- 
treme. 



HIGHEST STOCK QUOTATIONS FOB WEEK ENDINO FEB. 



NAtfRnr Uim 







U 

All- 

Alpha 

1 
'Alto.. 

n Hut . . 


Belcher.. 

Belmont 

Baltimore 

Bullion 

I reek . . 

Point 

Choltonge 

■Ohollar 

I tomel 

i on \ tabus 

uia 

Caledonia 

■, oUtan . .. 

don... 

Oonfldenee 

Condor 

Cabinet 

Da] ton] 

! ■ 

Empire Mill 

Eureka Con 

Exchequer 

Eldorado South . 

Eclipse 

Edinburgh 

•Europa 

East Upbir 

Globe 

Gould St Curry .. 
Glencoe Con 

Gold Run 

Gila 

"Golden Chariot. 

Glasgow 

Hale & Noreross. 

Hussey 

Imperial 

Internationa] . .. 

Ida Elmore 

Jackson 

Justice 

Jefferson 

Julia , 

Jenny Glynn 

Knickerbocker'. . 

Kentuck 

K. K. Con 

Kossuth 

Kelscy 

Lady Bryan 

Leopard 

Leo 

"Lady Wash'n... 

Leviathan 

Mexican 

Monumental 

"Meadow Valley. 



Miller 

"Mint 

Mansfield 

Murks & Darrow. 

*Ncw York 

Nevada 

*North Carson .. 

Niagara 

"NewCoso 

Northern Belle .. 

Newark 

Ophir 

Overman 

Original Gold Hill 

Occidental 

Pioneer 

"Pioche 

Prospect 

Pacific 

Poonnan 

Phil Sheridan... 

"Prusman 

Panther 

Rye Patch 

Rock Island 

Raymond & Ely. 
Seg - . Caledonia , . 
South California 

'Savage 

Sierra Nevada. .. 
Seg. Belcher .... 

Silver Hill 

South Silver Hill 

'Succor 

South Chariot. . . 

Safe Deposit 

Union Con 

Dtah 

*\Vondville 

West Onistock.. 

Wells Fargo 

West Belcher 

Yellow Jacket. .. 



21 1 



-i.i Tin v.r'i 



27j 



n.l 



i 
105 I 104 I — 



21* 



IBS 



ni 



101 



ttj 



BO, 

1 



10} 



1U2! 



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uii 



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16J 




The Stocks ahove marked thus * are Assessed. 



Colonel L. G. Elliot, counsel of Jeremiah Clarke and Dr. L. F. Elliot, 
left on Friday for Portland, Oregon, to look after their interests in their 
suit against the Oregon and California Railroad. 






14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



[Feb. 19, 1876. 



SPECIAL BREVITIES. 



A Lion-Tamer's Peril. — The Journal du Havre recounts a terrible en- 
counter between the lion-tamer Bidel and a number of wild beasts. Bi- 
det's custom was to go into the cage of these ferocious animals accompa- 
nied by a sheep, which was, by his presence, kept safe from attack. On 
a recent occasion he proceeded to the lion's cage, and his first act was to 

Slace the sheep on the back of a lioness, as he had frequently done before. 
To sooner bad he accomplished this than a powerful lion sprang upon the 
poor sheep and buried his teeth into a vital part of its body. There was 
a large number of spectators present, and, as may be imagined, the sudden 
act of the lion created an instant and general panic. Bidel stepped for- 
ward, and with the utmost coolness struck the lion a blow on the mouth 
with a heavy stick, which made him crouch and yell with pain, and throw 
his bleeding victim trembling at the feet of the courageous performer. In 
another moment, however, all the wild beasts were lashed into fury by the 
sight of the blood, and no one in the assembly believed that Bidel could 
possibly escape. Preserving his presence of mind, however, he kept the 
other animals at bay until he had subdued the lion and chased him back 
to his cage. He then fought his way back through the other animals, and 
amidst the bravos of the assembly came out triumphantly, carrying his 
wounded sheep with him. The poor animal, which was a great favorite of 
the lion-tamer, has since died of its wounds. 

The Russian Diamond Person. — The Paris correspondent of the 
Philadelphia Telegraph writes : Mrs. Blackford has come to the surface 
of public topics again. Her superb Russian horses, her carriages, and her 
span of perfectly matched ponies, formerly belonging to the Prince of 
Wales, are to be sold for debt in the Rue de Ponthieu to-day. The re : 
mainder of her rich furniture is to be sold at the Hotel Dronot next week, 
part of it having been already disposed of. f he has written to several of 
the leading papers here, positively denying that she was forbidden access 
to the Casino at Monaco, as was generally stated. Her intimate friend 
and constant companion, a woman f idly as shameless and well-nigh as no- 
torious as herself, and also, I am sorry to state, an American of respect- 
able parentage and antecedents, was married a few days ago to a French 
nobleman. Imagine the sensation which this peculiarly abominable mar- 
riage has created in social circles in Paris. The gentleman who has thus 
outraged public opinion and set society and decency alike at defiance is 
well known in the gay world. Mrs. Blackford is going to Constantinople, 
it is said ; but at all events she will not be permitted to return to Paris. 
Her second book is nearly ready for publication. 

There is a growing desire among the natives of India to copy the 
habits and customs of the English, and they sometimes indidge this incli- 
nation almost too closely. The death of a wealthy merchant " of Ma- 
dras named Purshottam Chetty took place the other day under the follow- 
ing untimely circumstances. While engaged in conviviality with some 
friends, the imprudent merchant offered to bet that he would drink twelve 
drams of rum one after the other. The wager being accepted, he swal- 
lowed dram after dram until he had finished the twelfth, when he fell 
down in a state of insensibility. Medical assistance was promptly sum- 
moned, but it was too late. Purshottam Chetty had won his wager, but 
lost his life. He never rallied, and his spirit passed away under the influ- 
ence of rum. This, it is stated, is the first case of the sort that has oc- 
curred in India. Let us hope it will be the last. 

H. E. Bird, the well-known chess-player, is over from England, and has 
already tasted the skill of a number of the best American players, includ- 
ing the champion, Captain McKenzie, of New York, thus far with very 
even result. Three of the best players in Europe — Messrs. Steinitz, Black- 
bni-ne and Zukertort — will probably take part in the chess congress to be 
held in connection with the national centennial. Rev. G. A. MacDonnell, 
one of the finest English players, has also intimated his intention of being 
present on that occasion, and Mr. Bird will also return, if his duties per- 
mit, and, with our Mr. McKenzie and other resident players, the event 
ought to be a marked one in the history of the game. 

After eighteen months' traveling, Lieutenant Cameron, it is re- 
ported, has succeeded in crossing Africa from east to west in a parallel of 
about five degrees south of the Equator. Particulars will be anxiously 
expected ; but, as it is also stated by the Standard that he arrived on the 
19th of November with his party at the mouth of the Congo, he must in 
that case have solved the problem of the source of that river, and with 
this solution is bound up the discovery of the water-shed of the Nile. It 
will be reniembered that Dr. Livingstone's last explorations were directed 
to that debateable region which contains the reservoirs of both rivers. 

The Spanish authorities in Cuba are now offering the countrymen a 
bounty of about §160 for every insurgent brought in, dead or alive, with 
an extra S15 for musket, and bounties of S50 to §150 for information 
brought in by countrymen enabling the troops to destroy insurgent camps, 
while farmers killing a rebel prefect or sub-prefect, or giving information 
producing that result, will receive S230. 

The product of the Virginia Consolidated mine, one of the bonanzas, 
for the calendar year, will amount to §17,000,000. The dividends paid to 
the stockholders, after all expenses are deducted, and a reserved fund set 
aside, amount to $11,448,000 on a capital of §10,800,000. On the present 
market valuation of §400 per share, the dividends for 1875 have paid '2C\ 
per cent, per annum. 

At the suggestion of the Empress Augusta, the Presidents of the dif- 
ferent Provinces are collecting specimens for the Philadelphia Exhibition 
of all apjjliances used in the treatment of the wounded in time of war. 
These objects will be exhibited together. They comprise a complete rail- 
way train fitted up expressly for the transport of sick and wounded 
soldiers. 

The palatial residence of James Ingersoll— a name notorious in the 
records of New York thievery as an associate of Tweed — was recently 
burned near South Norwalk, Connecticut. But little was saved. The 
loss is put at 5100,000, and the insurance at $80,000, which isn't so bad af- 
ter all for Ingersoll. 

Denmark is one of the few States that are doing well financially. Last 
year the actual receipts exceeded the estimates by more than 8^000,000 

crowns, aud 24,000,000 crowns of the National Debt were paid. 

The excavations now being pursued in the Olympiad by German 
archoejlogists have already brought to light a fine statue of Victory from 
the chisel of Praxiteles, in a perfect state of preservation. 



T 



A CARD. 
lie Pacific Jockey Club return thanks to their fellow-citi- 
zens au^ the public for the very libera) support given bo their effort ■ 
to this State a large number of the host thoroughbred horses. In evidence of their 

success, it is only necessary to read the names of the stars now here. Such a splendid 
field of horses the world has never seen. The benefit to the State and city derived 
from these annual exhibitions is well understood by every intelligent person. The 
mammoth purses given by California has obtained a world-wide celebrity, and the in- 
terest in the approaching event was never equaled iu the annals of the turf. The suc- 
cess of this enterprise is something of which every citizen may justly feel proud. 
The Club, on behalf of their fellow-citizens, extend a cordial welcome to those gentle- 
men who have brought their horses and retinue of attendants thousands of miles, at 
an expense of over 820,000, to take part in the " Carnival," and speak fur them a 
" fair field " and no favor, and may the best horse win. A. J. BRYANT, Pree. 
Joh.v Martin, Secretary. November 6. 



F. C. Snow.] 



[W. E. Mat 



SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. 
SNOW __ MAY, 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 
Pictures, Frames, Moldings, aud Artists' materials. 

21 Kearny St., near Market, S. F. Dec. 19. 

CUTTER WHISKY. 

AP. Hotaling: __ Co.. No. 431 Jackson street, are the Hole 
# Agents on this Coast for the celebrated J. H. CUTTER WHISKY, shipped di- 
rect to them from Louisville, Kentucky. The Trade are cautioned against the pur- 
chase of inferior and imitation brands of "J. H. Cutter Old Bourbon." Owing to 
its deserved reputation, various unprincipled parties are endeavoring- to palm off 
s purious grades. It is r eally the Best Whisky in the United States. March 13. 

BAGS, TESTS AND HOSE, 

NEVILLE & CO., 

113 Clay aud 114 Commercial Streets, 

San Francisco. [May 24. 

A- 8. ROSENBAUM & CO. 

Have removed to the Southeast corner of California and 
Battery streets, where they invite the attention of their cus turners and others 
to their large assortment uf the Best and Finest Brands of CHEWING and SMOKING 
TOBACCO, HAVANA CIGARS and CIGAKITOS. Consignments uf Choicest Brands 
of Cigars received by every Steamer. [Oct. 18 ] A. S. ROSENBAUM & CO. 



D. F. H_tcuixgs. 



J. Sanderson*. 



d. M. Dunne, 
PHCE^IX OIL WORKS. 

Established 1850.— Hatchings &. Co., Oil aud Commission 
Merchants, Manufacturers and Dealers in Sperm, Whale, Lard, Machinery and 
Illuminating Oils, 517 Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 8. 

WARNER'S SALOON, 
"VTorth Bench, on Itfeiggrs* Wharf.— For Fancy Dogs of pure 

J_^f breed and Bare Birds from Australia, China, Japan, and New Zealand, and 
all other parts of the world, go and see him. Take a drink. The cars will drop you at 
his door. Jan. 8. 

J. C. MERRILL & CO., 
\^ETholesale Auction House, 204 aud 206 California street. 

TT Sale days, Wednesdays and Saturdays at 10 a.m. Cash advances ou consign 

inents. D ec , li. 

REMOVAL. 
L. H. Newton.] NEWTON BROTHERS & CO., [Morris Newton. 

Importers and wholesale dealers in Teas, Foreign Goods and 
Groceries, have removed to 201 and 200 California street, San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia. June 7. 

B. F. Flint. Flint, Bixly _ Co.] [J. Lee. D. W. Foloer. 

A. P. FLINT & CO., 

Graders, Packers and 3>ealers iu wool, corner of Battery 
and Greenwich street., San Francisco ' Jan. _0. 

\ __r PRINTS ^& 

J_5_E_TJC___ 9 r537 SACRAMENTO STREET. 

) BELOW MONTGOMERY. 

BRITISH BENEVOLENT SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA 

Attendance, daily, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., by the under- 
signed, to receive subscriptions and donations, and to furnish all information 
relating to the Society. • J. P. lleCUKRIE, Secretary. 

J tpt 28. ■ 730 Montgomery street. 

STEELE'S SQUIRREL POISON. 
[Patented October IMA, 1875.] 

Sure death to Squirrels, Rats, Gophers, etc. For sale by all 
Druggists, Grocers and General Dealers. Price, $1 per box. Made by JAMES 
G. STEELE £ CO., San Francisco, Cab Liberal discount to the Trade. Aug. 21. . 

ELLIS READ, 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

Jnne 13.] 310 Clay Street San Francisco. 

CASTLE BROTHERS [Established, 1850.] 

Importers of Teas and East India Goods, Nos. 213 and 215 
Front street, San Francisco. Jan. 13. 



F 



C0NCENTRAT3D GREEN TURTLE. 
&nt up in cans of 2 1-2 Pounds aud warranted to keep. For 

sale b y K-HKiEHS, M_.Y_lt & CO. November 27. 

NOTICE. 
or the very best photographs go to Bradley __ Rulofson's, 

in an Elevator, 429 Montgomery street. Oct '2.0. 



JOSEPH GIILOTT'S S'EEL PENS. 
old by all Stationers throughout the World. Sole Aaron t 

for the United States : MK. HliNRY OWEN, 91 John street, N. Y. Jan. 16. 

STEINWAY PIANOS, 



S 



The Best Beyond All Dibpute, 
At Gray's New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street. 

[July 31.] 



F 



QUICKSILVER. 
or sale—In lots to suit, by Thomas Bell, No. 305 Sansome 

street, over Bank of California. Nov. 10. 



CHARLES LE GAY, 
American Commission Merchant, - - 1 Rue Scribe, Paris. 



MA ADVERTISER. 



16 



A VALENTINE. 

bin* ; 

\\ oj t .it t!ii-> tin 

of tlaya w hen Ulii 

iv, vrhen everything's -Utrk and dreiu*, 
Wliv do j vili ntiiH .1 

ill through ami through, 
bud t" u-li <>f my love >•• true, 

ileep uid blosomi were dead. 
An ■! Iowa on my bead; 

B •. littJ ■ l- ■ mine, 

: -r yout valentine ! 

fat/or ftftniory. 

AN UNDIGNIFIED SQUABBLE. 
The London correspondent "f the tfondl B*y> : "An 

d going on between 
our Post Office Department and tLe PoetmaHter-General of the United 
Ar the end of the year just eloa d the laal named functionary 
a cable dispatch from the authorities at St. 
I e Grand to tins effect: 'Money-orders advised on lists from 
the United States largely exceed the usual amount Please remit 
on account.' The fact was that the Americans wishing to Bend ' Ihristmas 
their friends and relatives in England and Ireland chiefly in 
Ireland, I suspect bad been so liberal that the money-order department 
of the United States had been ti led with business, and had Largely over- 
drawn its account here. The Postmaster-General had sent 612,000 to 
the receipt of the Bngii»h telegram, and was preparing to 
■and another remittance when thi inch he took t<> be a 'dun,' 

reached him. H was angry. He did not like to be 'dunned, 1 especially 

: - ■! itself to his mind, and was 
acted upon. The United States Post Office Department had been 
transporting the English mails to and From Australia across the continent 
—that is, from New York to Sun Francisco, and from San Francisco to 
New York— at a merely nominal rate, or, to come to figures, at Fourpence 
n pound, although it paid the railway companies $15 30£orthei 
Why the Unil bould ever have consented to such 

an arrangement does not appear ; but PostmaateiH reneral Jewell was glad 
of anexi aside. So he indulged in the luxury of a cable dispatch, 

and informed the British postal authorities that, since they were uncom- 
monly particular about their beggarly money-order balance, he would pay 
it when he was ready ; but that on and after the brat of the new year he 
should require them to pay 815 30 per pound for the transporation of their 
Australian mails across I fncle Sam's dominions. The difference between 
foarpence a pound and $15 30 a pound is E102 13s. 4d. a ton, and as the 
Australian and New Zealand mails sent by this route are very heavy and 
ntly becoming more so, the American Postmaster-General doubtless 
thinks he has made a good thin? out of the little unpleasantness." 



A PERFECTLY WELL-DRESSED "WOMAN. 

She was not beautiful, nor even pretty ; she had not even a fine fig- 
ure. But as she approached the august presence I was conscious of a 
ure. As she came nearer and nearer, this increased, 
and when it became all too certain that it was not her beauty which 
this delightful sensation, there was a moment of thoughtful hesita- 
tion, and then it became clear enough that it was the woman's dress that 
was bo beautiful, and that it was the extreme rarity of this particular kind 
of beauty which made the sensation. Of course we must tell what this 
It was i simple loose gown high upon the shoulders, girdled 
but n it tightlv at the waist, and falling in tight, easy folds not to 
the ground, but nearly to the ground behind and not quite so low before, 
so that as the woman walked not even the hem of her garments swept the 
sidewalk. There was not a flounce or a ruffle, or a plait, or a patch of 
trimming of any kind upon- the dress, the skirt of which was simple 
enough to afford perfect ease of motion and to be graceful, but was not 
full, "was not tied back, did not hang over a bustle, and there was no over- 
skirt. The material was muslin, or some cotton stuff ; and it was not 
Starched. It did not stand stiff, or break up into patches, or make a rust- 
id a crackling as she walked. It was soft in texture, and in its out- 
lines, and noiseless. Had it no ornaments at all ? Yes, indeed. Around 
the bottom hem, at the wrists and at the throat there was a narrow fig- 
ured border of bine, beautiful in 'design and color, which gave the dress a 
perfect finish, and was attractive in itself, without being at all obtrusive. 
Over this dress she wore a bright, light garment of the same material, 
less and to the hips. The costume might have been worn by a 
■mi n, Aspasia herself, to the delight of Pericles, and yet there 
was nothing about it which seemed outre or even strange, except its sim- 
ple elegance. 

REVIEWS. 
The Cotton States. By Charles NordhofT. Anpleton & Co., New York ; Ro- 
man, Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
This is a reissue of a series of letters to the New York Herald, on the 
political and industrial condition of the Southern States, written last year. 
Mr. (.'. Nordhoff is too well known on this coast to need our commenda- 
tions. Seeking and describing facts, he has not succeeded in pleasing any 
party. Although a Republican, he is not by any means favorably im- 
pressed with the action of the Federal Government. The letters are full 
of interesting information, and will be read with profit by all parties. 
International Scientific Series, Vol. XVIII. The Natnre of Lljrhr, with 
ft General Account ol Physical Optics, By Dr. Eugene Lomrael, Professor 
ofPhysice in the University ol Elanycn. Appleton & Co., New York -, Ro- 
man, Montgomery street, Sun Francisco. 
This series should have a place in every library. Dr. LommeVs descrip- 
tion of the phenomena of light is clear, concise and not overloaded with 
mathematics. Absorption, phosphorescence, and the colors of the soap 
bubble, will be found of great interest to the young, for whom this volume 
forms an appropriate present. 



MEDICAL DIRECTORY. 



BOBEBT li.NMin M IiAi.i.. 
Consulting Burvoon and Pbyilclan. 

Offloo hour, in \ h d 

A CARD. 
I H. Ktnllnnl. I'li.viJclmi. B.B., London; B.B.C.P., I,on- 

• F • don .Mi 

iv hour. 



DR. GE1B.GE C. MATTHEWS, 

Lleenlltite Ho* nl OollejM Of ■urffeona, Ireland: I.. R.C.I*. 
. Intern Rotunda Lyliix in [|u i Sv 

322 11th elrc-cl, Oakland. Offici 1., 7 to P.M. D 

DR L. V. ENGLEHARD, 
*£•>*£ Kwwpny street. CoiisumIiik- Physician and surgeon. 
0-*.0 Sp Office Hours: 121 t.. 

>' M. |?oi 

DOCTOR ANDREI 
m retnrnod from CD rope, ami may bo found at liis ofliee, 

I '..ink. 

PHYSICIAN. SUBGEON AM> ACCOI'CIIEtlt, 

J. J. AUEBBACH, M.D., 
March W. 

NOTICE. 
r. A. J. Bow le has retained the practice or his profession. 

Office, OSS Olaj street. Office Hours from 10 a.m. to 8 P.ic. Sept. 87. 



H 



D 



N. MILLER, M.D., 
Itayslclan, Oakland. Office, 1001 Broadway; Residence. 301 

Octobe r S 

DR. J. P. M00KLa£ 



23 Post street Office Hours, 11 A. Iff. to 2 'P.M. 



Oct. ifi. 



TO THE OWNERS OF REAL ESTATE. 

Persons owning: Heal Estate that has heretofore hecn as- 
sessed in the former owner's name are requested to appear personal or Bend 
their deeds to the Assessor's Office, IMMEDIATELY, and have tin; tiecessarj changes 
made for next year's roll. The work on the Ilea] Estate ltnll will commence in -i few 
days, after which it will be too late for any changes. 
Jan. 22. ALEXANDER BADLAM, City and County Assessor. 

TAMALPAIS HOTEL, 8AN RAFAEL. 

The above named hotel will be opened to the public on or 
about the tir^r "f May. Parties desiring rooms for the season can make appli- 
cation for the same cither by letter or to tbc undersigned at the hot* I. 

April 24. SAMUEL HUBBARD, Proprietor. 



J. B. Ciiai-man] 



[Established in 1859.] 
CHAPMAN & 00., 



[Joux Baieb. 



Contractors for Niffht Work.— Vaults, Cesspools, Sewers, 
yards, etc., cleaned. Sewers repaired and properly laid. otiice : 813 Dupont* 
street, between Bush and Sutter, San Francisco. Nov. 20. 



ENGLISH BRANCHES, 

Together with French Language and Literature, taught by 
Prof. Uictz, Ph. D. {University of Fiance). Holder of a First-Grade Teachers 
Certificate issued by the City and County Board of Examination, Department <>i Pub- 
lic Schools, San Francisco. 940 Folsom street, near Fifth. Jau. 1. 

Frkd'k A. Elliott. Chas. Willmot. John S. BUOBSB. 

SWAN BREWERY COMPANY, 

B reivers and Bottlers of the Swnu Ales and Porter. 
Brewery, Bottling Establishment and Main Office, Southeast corner Fifl eentb 
and Dolores Btreets, Sau Francisco. May 2&. 

SNOW & MAY'S ART GALLERY. 
VTowon exhibition, the "Capture of the Sernpis/' by Mr. 

J3l James Hamilton, together with a choice collection of Ku"opean Pictures. Ad- 
mission, 25 cents. ■ Jan. 1. 

Wm. H. Stewart.] STEWART & GREATHOUSE, [0. R. Grbathodse. 

Attorueys-at-Xiau-, Rooms 42, 43, 45 and 46, Nevada 
Block, San Francisco. Will practice in all the Courts of California, Nevada 

and the Territories. Dec. 11. 

C. L. Craokbon.] C. A. MURDOCH: & CO. O. A. Murdoch. 

Job Printers, Successors to Jl. I>. Carr A Co., IVo. 532 Clay 
street, Han Francisco. Cal. Feb. :i. 



J. H. CUTTER OLD BOURBON. 

C^l P. Moorman A Co., Manufacturers, Louisville, Ky.--- 
j 9 The above well-known House is represented here by the undersigned, who 
have been appointed their Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
July 3. A. P. HOTALING &, CO., 429 and 431 Jackson street, S. F. 

WANTED, 

By a respectable and industrious young: man. a situation 
in a first-class house as Salesman or Assistant Bookkeeper. Best of references 
given. Address " K.," this office Jan. 22, 

H. H. MOORE. 

Dealer in Books for Libraries. — A large assortment or fine 
and ra re books ju^t received, and for Bale at 600 Montgomery street, near Mer- 
chant, San Francisco. Oct. 24. 

A, T. ELLIOTT, 

Ship an) Grain Broker, 214 California street, San Frau- 
cisco. H'ips a Specialty. Jan. 22. 



G. H. MUM& & CVS CHAMPAGNES. 

Dry Verzenay, quarts and pints: Extra I>ry, quarts ami 
pints, RUHL BROS., Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 522 Montgomery street, San 

Fnncisco. Pec. 18. 

PLUMBERS' GOODS. 

The Most Complete Assortment in the C'ty. 

Feb. 12. THOMAS DAY. v» and 124 Sutter street. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 19, 1876. 



1876. 

ENGLAND TO A MSBICA. 

Land of the "West ! a Century the record of thine age. 
Thou hast a name that darkens all on History's wide page, 
Let all the blasts of fame ring out, thine shall be loudest far, 
Let others boast their satelites, thou hast the planet star ; 
Thou hast a name whose characters of light shall ne'er depart, 
"Tie stamped upon the dullest brain, and warms the coldest heart ; 
A war-cry fit for any land where freedom? 8 to be won; 
Land of the West ! it stands alone, it is thy Washington ! 
He fought, but not with love of strife ; he struck, but to defend ; 
And ere he turned a people's foe, he sought to be a friend ; 
He strove to keep his country's light by Reason's gentle word, 
And sighed when fell Injustice tlhrew the challenge sword to sword ; 
He stood the firm, the calm, the wise, the patriot and sage ; 
He showed no deep avenging hate, no burst of despot rage ; 
He stood for Liberty and Truth, and daringly led on. 
'Till shouts of "Victory gave forth the name of Washington ! 
England, my heart is truly thine, my loved, my native earth, 
The land that holds a mother's grave and gave that mother birth ; 
Oh ! keenly sad would be the fate that thrust me from thy shores — 
And faltering my breath that sighed " Farewell for evermore ;" 
But did I meet such adverse lot, I would not seek to dwell 
Where olden heroes wrought the deeds for Homer's song to tell. 
Away thou gallant ship ! I'd cry and bear me swiftly on, 
But bear me from my own fair land to that of Washington ! 

— Eliza Cook. 

"MEN WE KNOW." 
Mr. James G. Fair. 

The subject of this sketch, a superb likeness of whom is issued 
with this number, is one of the celebrated quartette of " Bonanza 
Princes," holding the control of the famous Bonanza mines, the colossal 
wealth and vast extent of which render them one of the foremost wonders 
of the world. Mr. Fair was born Dec. 3d, 1831, in Clougher, Tyrone 
county, Ireland. He came to this country in 1843, and resided at Geneva, 
Illinois, for some years, where he attended school. From there he went to 
Chicago, where he received a good business education. When the news 
from the newly discovered El I)orado set on fire all the adventurous spir- 
its of the East, Mr. Fair caught the infection and came to California, wo 
the Oregon route. He arrived onLong's Bar, Feather River, in the month 
of August, 1849. From that time Mr. Fair adhered to mining with a 
tenacity born of a genuine enthusiasm and interest in the occupation. He 
continued at the business with varying success, and finally found hiihself 
in 1850 in Virginia City, where he was engagedin quartz mining at Angels, 
Calaveras county. In 1855 he became the Superintendent of the Ophir 
mine, and the Hale & Norcross mine in 1857. It was during their con- 
nection with this latter mine that the great Bonanza firm made the first 
half million of their now enormous fortune. The idea then occurred to 
Messrs. Flood and Fair, of the then moderately successful and compara- 
tively unknown firm, to obtain control of what was then known as the 
California and Sides mine, the White and Murphy, the Central (Nos. 1 
and 2) and the tract known as the Kinney ground. The claims were 
eventually secured, and to-day form the famous Consolidated Virginia 
and California mines